School of Engineering


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  • Allison Okamura

    Allison Okamura

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on developing the principles and tools needed to realize advanced robotic and human-machine systems capable of physical interaction. Application areas include surgery, simulation and training, rehabilitation, prosthetics, neuromechanics, exploration of hazardous and remote environments (e.g. space), design, and education.

  • Kunle Olukotun

    Kunle Olukotun

    Cadence Design Systems Professor and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioKunle Olukotun is the Cadence Design Systems Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Stanford University. Olukotun is well known as a pioneer in multicore processor design and the leader of the Stanford Hydra chip multiprocessor (CMP) research project. Olukotun founded Afara Websystems to develop high-throughput, low-power multicore processors for server systems. The Afara multicore processor, called Niagara, was acquired by Sun Microsystems. Niagara derived processors now power all Oracle SPARC-based servers. Olukotun currently directs the Stanford Pervasive Parallelism Lab (PPL), which seeks to proliferate the use of heterogeneous parallelism in all application areas using Domain Specific Languages (DSLs).

  • John Ousterhout

    John Ousterhout

    Leonard Bosack and Sandy Lerner Professor in the School of Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOusterhout's research ranges across a variety of topics in system software, software development tools, and user interfaces. His current research is in the area of granular computing: new software stack layers that allow the execution of large numbers of very small tasks (as short as a few microseconds) in a datacenter. Current projects are developing new techniques for thread management, network communication, and logging.