School of Engineering


Showing 1-20 of 146 Results

  • Thomas M. Krummel, MD, FACS/FAAP

    Thomas M. Krummel, MD, FACS/FAAP

    Emile Holman Professor, Susan B. Ford Surgeon-in-Chief at LPCH, and Professor, by courtesy, of Cardiothoracic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSurgical Innovation, Simulation and Virtual Reality in Surgical Education, Fetal Healing-Cellular and Biochemical Mechanisms

  • Gregory Kovacs

    Gregory Kovacs

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHis present research areas include instruments for biomedical and biological applications including space flight, solid-state sensors and actuators, cell-based sensors for toxin detection and pharmaceutical screening, microfluidics, electronic interfaces to tissue, and biotechnology, all with emphasis on solving practical problems.

  • Riitta Katila

    Riitta Katila

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe question that drives Prof. Katila's research is how technology-based firms with significant resources can stay innovative. Her work lies at the intersection of the fields of technology, innovation, and strategy and focuses on strategies that enable organizations to discover, develop and commercialize technologies. She combines theory with longitudinal large-sample data (e.g., robotics, biomedical, multi-industry datasets), background fieldwork, and state-of-the-art quantitative methods. The ultimate objective is to understand what makes technology-based firms successful.

    To answer this question, Prof. Katila conducts two interrelated streams of research. She studies (1) strategies that help firms leverage their existing resources (leverage stream), and (2) strategies through which firms can acquire new resources (acquisition stream) to create innovation. Her early contributions were firm centric while recent contributions focus on innovation in the context of competitive interaction.

    Professor Katila's work has appeared in the Academy of Management Journal, Administrative Science Quarterly, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Research Policy and other outlets. In her most recent work, supported by the National Science Foundation, Katila examines how firms create new products successfully. Focusing on the robotics and medical device industries, she investigates how different search approaches, such as the exploitation of existing knowledge and the exploration for new knowledge, influence the kinds of new products that technology-intensive firms introduce. Professor Katila has served on the editorial boards of several leading journals including Administrative Science Quarterly, Organization Science, Strategic Organization, and the Strategic Management Journal.

  • Thomas Kenny

    Thomas Kenny

    Richard W. Weiland Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs in the School of Engineering

    BioKenny's group is researching fundamental issues and applications of micromechanical structures. These devices are usually fabricated from silicon wafers using integrated circuit fabrication tools. Using these techniques, the group builds sensitive accelerometers, infrared detectors, and force-sensing cantilevers. This research has many applications, including integrated packaging, inertial navigation, fundamental force measurements, experiments on bio-molecules, device cooling, bio-analytical instruments, and small robots. Because this research field is multidisciplinary in nature, work in this group is characterized by strong collaborations with other departments, as well as with local industry.

  • Oussama Khatib

    Oussama Khatib

    Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    BioKhatib's research is in autonomous robots, human-centered robotics, human-friendly robot design, dynamic simulations, and haptic interactions. His exploration in this research ranges from the autonomous ability of a robot to cooperate with a human to the haptic interaction of a user with an animated character, virtual prototype, or surgical instrument.

  • Jeffrey R. Koseff

    Jeffrey R. Koseff

    William Alden Campbell and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioJeff Koseff, founding co-director of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment, is an expert in the interdisciplinary domain of environmental fluid mechanics. His research focuses on the interaction between physical and biological systems in natural aquatic environments, and in particular on turbulence and internal wave dynamics; transport, mixing, and phytoplankton dynamics in estuarine systems; and coral reef, kelp forest, and sea-grass hydrodynamics. More recently he has begun focusing on the fate of brine discharges in the near coastal ocean from desalination facilities, and on the use of natural vegetation for providing coastal protection and resilience. Long-term research projects include understanding the transport of mass and momentum in estuarine systems such as San Francisco Bay, and understanding how water flow affects the functioning of California kelp forests, and the coral reef systems of the Great Barrier Reef, the Red Sea and Hawaii. Koseff has served on the board of governors of the Israel Institute of Technology and has served on the visiting committees of the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University, Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research and The MIT-WHOI Joint Program. He is a former member of the Independent Science Board of the Bay/Delta Authority.

  • Ellen Kuhl

    Ellen Kuhl

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestscomputaitonal simulation of brain development, cortical folding, computational simulation of cardiac disease, heart failure, left ventricular remodeling, electrophysiology, excitation-contraction coupling, computer-guided surgical planning, patient-specific simulation

  • Chaitan Khosla

    Chaitan Khosla

    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health.

    For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases.

    For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine.

    Recently, we initiated a collaborative program involving multiple Stanford laboratories (http://med.stanford.edu/virx.html.html) that is aimed at developing a fundamentally new approach to treating viral infections. As part of this initiative, we are developing an antiviral chemotherapy that modulates pyrimidine metabolism in the host, and also a platform to engineer immuno-modulatory glycolipids for the treatment of influenza.

  • Anshul Kundaje

    Anshul Kundaje

    Assistant Professor of Genetics and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe develop statistical and machine learning frameworks to learn predictive, dynamic and causal models of gene regulation from heterogeneous functional genomics data.

  • Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Butrus Khuri-Yakub

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering

    BioButrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 550 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 94 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.

  • Peter K. Kitanidis

    Peter K. Kitanidis

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioKitanidis develops methods for the solution of interpolation and inverse problems utilizing observations and mathematical models of flow and transport. He studies dilution and mixing of soluble substances in heterogeneous geologic formations, issues of scale in mass transport in heterogeneous porous media, and techniques to speed up the decay of pollutants in situ. He also develops methods for hydrologic forecasting and the optimization of sampling and control strategies.

  • Anne Kiremidjian

    Anne Kiremidjian

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioKiremidjian's current research focuses on the design and implementation of wireless sensor networks for structural damage and health monitoring and the development of robust algorithms for structural damage diagnosis that can be embedded in wireless sensing units. She works on structural component and systems reliability methods; structural damage evaluation models; and regional damage, loss and casualty estimation methods utilizing geographic information and database management systems for portfolios of buildings or spatially distributed lifeline systems assessment with ground motion and structure correlations.

  • Joy Ku

    Joy Ku

    Research Technical Manager, Bioengineering

    Current Role at StanfordI am the Director for Simbios (http://simbios.stanford.edu), the National Center for Physics-Based Simulations of Biological Structures. The Center is funded by the NIH. In addition to the research we conduct on a diverse range of structures -- from molecules to musculoskeletal systems -- the Center provides both software and training opportunities. We also support Simtk.org (http://simtk.org), a web portal for collaborating on and publicly sharing biocomputational projects, and the Biomedical Computation Review magazine (http://biomedicalcomputationreview.org/).

  • Christine Kurihara

    Christine Kurihara

    Administrative Associate (Prakash Lab), Bioengineering

    Current Role at StanfordLab Administrator, Prakash Lab, Bioengineering Department

  • Leonid Kazovsky

    Leonid Kazovsky

    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Kazovsky and his research group are investigating green energy-efficient networks. The focus of their research is on access and in-building networks and on hybrid optical / wireless networks. Prof. Kazovsky's research group is also conducting research on next-generation Internet architectures and novel zero-energy photonic components.

  • Sharon L Krossa, PhD

    Sharon L Krossa, PhD

    Drupal Consultant & Trainer, Bioengineering
    Casual - Non-Exempt, School of Medicine - CMGM

    Current Role at StanfordDrupal consultant & trainer. (Note: some entries in my CAP profile are for testing purposes only—if something seems ridiculous, it probably is!)