School of Engineering


Showing 1-50 of 187 Results

  • Michael Longaker

    Michael Longaker

    Deane P. and Louise Mitchell Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe have six main areas of current interest: 1) Cranial Suture Developmental Biology, 2)Distraction Osteogenesis, 3) Cleft Palate and Lip Biology, 4)Keloid and Hypertrophic Scar Biology, 5) Scarless Fetal Wound Healing, 6) Novel Gene and Stem Cell Therapeutic Approaches.

  • Michael Levitt

    Michael Levitt

    Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor in Cancer Research in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshaving pioneered, we (a) predict folding of a polypeptide and RNA chains into a unique native-structure, we (b) model protein structure using the well-established paradigms that similar protein sequences imply similar three-dimensional structures, and (c) we are focusing on mesoscale modeling of large macromolecular complexes such as RNA polymerase and the mammalian chaperonin.

  • David Liang, MD, PhD

    David Liang, MD, PhD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioStanford researchers are creating a micro-device that physicians could guide through the body to help diagnose and treat clogged arteries and other diseases. Tethered to the outside world by a thin wire, a tiny machine creeps through blood vessels, searching out deadly plaques and obliterating them with a zap of a laser. While a laser will come later, for now David Liang, MD, PhD, is focusing on a tiny eye that could give physicians an unprecedented view into blood vessels.

  • Craig Levin

    Craig Levin

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford/Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Physics, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular Imaging Instrumentation
    Laboratory

    Our research interests involve the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of cellular and molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animal subjects.

  • Larry Leifer

    Larry Leifer

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioLeifer's engineering design thinking research is focused on instrumenting design teams to understand, support, and improve design practice and theory. Specific issues include: design-team research methodology, global team dynamics, innovation leadership, interaction design, design-for-wellbeing, and adaptive mechatronic systems.

  • Marc Levenston

    Marc Levenston

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Laboratory)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab's research involves the function, degeneration and repair of musculoskeletal soft tissues, with a focus on meniscal fibrocartilage and articular cartilage. We are particularly interested in the complex interactions between biophysical and biochemical cues in controlling cell behavior, the roles of these interactions in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, and development of tissue engineered 3D model systems for studying physical influences on primary and progenitor cells.

  • Richard Luthy

    Richard Luthy

    Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil Engineering

    BioRichard G. Luthy is the Silas H. Palmer Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. He is the Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Re-inventing the Nation’s Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt), a four-university consortium that seeks more sustainable solutions to urban water challenges in the arid west.

    His area of teaching and research is environmental engineering and water quality with applications to water reuse, stormwater use, and systems-level analysis of our urban water challenges. His research addresses management of persistent organic contaminants and contaminants of emerging concern in natural systems that are engineered to improve water quality and protect the environment and human health.

    Professor Luthy is a past chair of the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board and a former President of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors. He chaired the NRC's Committee on the Beneficial Use of Stormwater and Graywater. He is a registered professional engineer, a board certified environmental engineer, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

  • Sanjiva Lele

    Sanjiva Lele

    Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Lele's research combines numerical simulations with modeling to study fundamental unsteady flow phemonema, turbulence, flow instabilities, and flow-generated sound. Recent projects include shock-turbulent boundary layer interactions, supersonic jet noise, wind turbine aeroacoustics, wind farm modeling, aircraft contrails, multi-material mixing and multi-phase flows involving cavitation. He is also interested in developing high-fidelity computational methods for engineering applications.

  • James Leckie

    James Leckie

    C.L. Peck, Class of 1906 Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Geological Sciences

    BioLeckie investigates chemical pollutant behavior in natural aquatic systems and engineered processes, specifically the environmental aspects of surface and colloid chemistry and the geochemistry of trace elements. New research efforts are focused on the development of techniques and models for assessment of exposure of humans to toxic chemicals. Specific attention has been paid to the evaluation of exposure of young children to toxic chemicals. Other interests include technology transfer and the development of environmental science programs in developing nations.

  • Adrian Lew

    Adrian Lew

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProf. Lew's interests lie in the broad area of computational solid mechanics. He is concerned with the fundamental design and mathematical analysis of material models and numerical algorithms.

    Currently the group is focused on the design of algorithms to simulate hydraulic fracturing. To this end we work on algorithms for time-integration embedded or immersed boundary methods.

  • Kincho Law

    Kincho Law

    Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioLaw's research interest is in the application of advanced computing principles and techniques for structural engineering analysis and design. His research interests include computational mechanics, numerical methods, and analysis and simulation of large-scale systems using distributed workstations and high performance parallel computers. His work has also dealt with sensing, monitoring and control of structures as well as various aspects of computer-aided design, including application of information technology to facilitate regulatory compliance assistance, to facilitate analysis and design of building structures and to coordinate concurrent engineering design activities.

  • Michael Lin

    Michael Lin

    Associate Professor of Neurobiology, of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab applies biochemical and engineering principles to the development of protein-based tools for molecular imaging and gene therapy. Topics of investigation include fluorescent proteins structure and biophysics, fluorescent protein-based biosensors, spatiotemporal analysis of protein translation pathways, chemical control of protein translation, and light-responsive proteins.

  • Fei-Fei Li

    Fei-Fei Li

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman vision, high-level visual recognition, computational neuroscience

  • Aaron Lindenberg

    Aaron Lindenberg

    Associate Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioLindenberg's research is focused on visualizing the ultrafast dynamics and atomic-scale structure of materials on femtosecond and picosecond time-scales. X-ray techniques are combined with ultrafast optical techniques to provide a new way of taking snapshots of materials in motion. Current research is focused on the dynamics of phase transitions, ultrafast properties of nanoscale materials, and charge transport, with a focus on materials for information storage technologies, energy-related materials, and nanoscale optoelectronic devices.

  • Raymond Levitt

    Raymond Levitt

    Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Levitt founded and directs Stanford’s Global Projects Center (GPC), which conducts research, education and outreach to enhance financing, governance and sustainability of global building and infrastructure projects. Dr. Levitt's research focuses on developing enhanced governance of infrastructure projects procured via Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) delivery, and alternative project delivery approaches for complex buildings like full-service hospitals or data centers.

  • Jure Leskovec

    Jure Leskovec

    Associate Professor of Computer Science

    BioLeskovec's research focuses on the analyzing and modeling of large social and information networks as the study of phenomena across the social, technological, and natural worlds. He focuses on statistical modeling of network structure, network evolution, and spread of information, influence and viruses over networks. Problems he investigates are motivated by large scale data, the Web and other on-line media. He also does work on text mining and applications of machine learning.

  • Jin Hyung Lee

    Jin Hyung Lee

    Associate Professor of Neurology, of Neurosurgery and of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn vivo visualization and control of neural circuits

  • Gina Liebig

    Gina Liebig

    Assistant Director, Engineering Research Administration

    Current Role at StanfordAssistant Director for ERA

  • Michael Lyons

    Michael Lyons

    Adjunct Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
    Adjunct Professor, Management Science and Engineering

    BioMr. Lyons currently serves as Chairman of CypherPath, a converged infrastructure virtualization company and former Chairman of Shadow Networks, Inc. a cyber security company acquired by Alcalvio in 2016; both are based on technology developed through a tech transfer partnership with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He also serves as a Director of Real-Time Innovations, a privately held software company focused on advanced real-time integration of complex systems and a major thought leader in the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). He also serves as a Managing Director of the Meta Club, an early stage special purpose VC fund. He is a strategic advisor to ICEYE, a SAR-based microsatellite data acquisition company.
    He is also a Managing Director of NewLine Ventures, LLC, a management consulting firm. From 2008 to 2011, he also served as a Venture Partner with the Paladin Capital Group in Washington, D.C. and as a Venture Partner for ePlanet Ventures I and II. He was a co-founder and General Partner of Zilkha Venture Partners (Fund closed out in 2003), an early stage venture capital partnership focused on seed and first round investments in IT and bio-technology companies, principally located in Silicon Valley. He founded SafeView, Inc. in 2002, a Government Laboratory (PNNL) spinout, to address aspects of the anti-terrorist physical security market; the Company closed A and B rounds totaling more than $23M led by Draper Fisher Jurvetson, ePlanet Ventures, GE/Invision, Paladin Capital Group, and Novak Biddle. He served as Chairman until its sale to L3 Communications in March, 2006. This technology is now the security standard in airports worldwide.

    Concurrently, Mr. Lyons is a Consulting Associate Professor at the Stanford University Department of Management Science and Engineering. Serving in the Stanford position since 1988, he was a co-developer of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program with Prof. Tom Byers and the founding professor of Technology Venture Formation. He also co-teaches, with Prof. Ray Levitt, Entrepreneurship in Civil and Environmental Engineeering. Both of these courses are some of the highest rated courses in the School of Engineering. He is the co-creator of the Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship two week program for existing high tech companies produced and managed by the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD). This program has just completed its five year anniversary. He has co-produced and delivered numerous other SCPD and STVP programs. He is a co-founder of the Innovation Institute focused on creating training platforms for entrepreneurial education.

    From 1980 to 1991, he was a co-founder, a Vice-President, and a Director of Integrated Systems Inc. (INTS, founded 1980), a leading implementer of high-performance real- time control systems for aircraft, automotive, and manufacturing applications. INTS was fundamentally a spinout from the Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab. The Company was merged with WindRiver Systems in 1999. WindRiver was acquired by Intel in 2009.

    Mr. Lyons received a Bachelors and Masters (equivalent) in Engineering Physics from Cornell University, an MSEE from Stanford, did Ph.D research in Aero/Astro at Stanford (abd) and an MBA, with Distinction, from the Pepperdine Presidential/Key Executive Program. He is a graduate of the Stanford/AEA Institute for the Management of High Technology Companies and a Price-Babson Fellow in Entrepreneurship Education. He holds an FAA multi-Engine Airline Transport Pilot License and Certified Flight Instructor Certificates for Instrument and Multi-Engine Aircraft. He is an avid sailor and motorcyclist.

  • Trevor Loy

    Trevor Loy

    Lecturer, Management Science and Engineering

    BioTrevor Loy is a Lecturer in the Department of Management Science & Engineering at Stanford University, where he co-teaches a graduate-level course titled "Entrepreneurial Management and Finance." Trevor is also the Managing Partner and Founder of Flywheel Ventures. He has over 20 years of investing, entrepreneurial and operating experience in technology ventures. He is also a past director of the National Venture Capital Association (NVCA), a co-founder of the New Mexico Venture Capital Association, and helped create the Rocky Mountain Venture Capital Association.

    At Flywheel, Trevor has made over two dozen investments, including those that led to the IPO of Jive Software (NASDAQ: JIVE), the acquisition of MicroProbe by FormFactor (NASDAQ: FORM), the acquisition of Tuscany Design Automation by Dassault Systèmes (NYSE Euronext: DSY), the acquisition of Samba Holdings by Cerca Group (privately held), and other confidential liquidity events.

    Prior to Flywheel Ventures, Trevor held entrepreneurial, executive and technical roles at companies including Gigabeat (backed by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, and acquired by Napster); Brooktree (acquired by Rockwell Semiconductor, now Conexant Systems); ParkingNet, Teradyne, and Intel Corporation.

    Trevor holds a BS Electrical Engineering, MS Electrical Engineering, and MS Management Science & Engineering, all from Stanford University.

  • Marc Levoy

    Marc Levoy

    VMware Founders Professor in Computer Science and Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioLevoy's current interests include light field sensing and display, computational imaging, digital photography, and applications of computer graphics in microscopy and biology.

  • Sanjay Lall

    Sanjay Lall

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    BioSanjay Lall is Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Information Systems Laboratory and Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University. He received a B.A. degree in Mathematics with first-class honors in 1990 and a Ph.D. degree in Engineering in 1995, both from the University of Cambridge, England. His research group focuses on the development of advanced engineering methodologies for the design of control, optimization and signal processing algorithms which occur in a wide variety of electrical, mechanical and aerospace systems. Before joining Stanford he was a Research Fellow at the California Institute of Technology in the Department of Control and Dynamical Systems, and prior to that he was a NATO Research Fellow at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems. He was also a visiting scholar at Lund Institute of Technology in the Department of Automatic Control. He has significant industrial experience applying advanced algorithms to problems including satellite systems at Lockheed Martin, advanced audio systems at Sennheiser, Formula 1 racing, and integrated circuit diagnostic systems, in addition to several startup companies. Professor Lall has served as Associate Editor for the journal Automatica, on the steering and program committees of several international conferences, and as a reviewer for the National Science Foundation, DARPA, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. He is the author of over 130 peer-refereed publications.

  • David Luenberger

    David Luenberger

    Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioDavid G. Luenberger received the B.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University, all in Electrical Engineering. Since 1963 he has been on the faculty of Stanford University. He helped found the Department of Engineering-Economic Systems, now merged to become the Department of Management Science and Engineering, where his is currently a professor.

    He served as Technical Assistant to the President's Science Advisor in 1971-72, was Guest Professor at the Technical University of Denmark (1986), Visiting Professor of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1976), and served as Department Chairman at Stanford (1980-1991).

    His awards include: Member of the National Academy of Engineering (2008), the Bode Lecture Prize of the Control Systems Society (1990), the Oldenburger Medal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (1995), and the Expository Writing Award of the Institute of Operations Research and Management Science (1999) He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (since 1975).

    Interests:
    His overall interest is the application of mathematics to issues in control, planning, and decision making. He has worked in the technical fields of control theory, optimization theory and algorithms, and investment theory for portfolios and project evaluation. He has published six major textbooks: Optimization by Vector Space Methods, Linear and Nonlinear Programming (jointly with Yinyu Ye), Introduction to Dynamic Systems, Microeconomic theory, Investment Science, and Information Science. He has published over eighty journal papers.

  • Monica Lam

    Monica Lam

    Professor of Computer Science, & by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioLam is the Faculty Director of the Stanford MobiSocial Laboratory, whose goal is to create disruptive mobile and social computing technology that serves consumers' interests and benefits the economy in the long term. Our current focus is to let everyone interact socially with each other, without having to join the same proprietary social network. The success of the project lies in making it FUN for the users and EASY for software developers. Released software prototypes and further information can be found on http://mobisocial.stanford.edu.

  • Christian Linder

    Christian Linder

    Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    BioChristian Linder is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In his research he advances modeling aspects, numerical algorithms, and visualization tools to improve the performance and reliability of simulations to (i) understand physical mechanisms in materials, (ii) create innovative sustainable building materials and structures, and (iii) enable upscaled devices and engineered systems of the environment. In-house (iv) computational method development in the area of Computational Mechanics and Computational Materials Science constitutes the foundation of our research.

    Dr. Linder received his Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering from UC Berkeley, an MA in Mathematics from UC Berkeley, an M.Sc. in Computational Mechanics from the University of Stuttgart, and a Dipl.-Ing. degree in Civil Engineering from TU Graz. Before joining Stanford in 2013 he was a Junior-Professor of Micromechanics of Materials at the Applied Mechanics Institute of Stuttgart University where he also obtained his Habilitation in Mechanics. Notable honors include a Fulbright scholarship, the 2013 Richard-von-Mises Prize, the 2016 ICCM International Computational Method Young Investigator Award, and the 2016 NSF CAREER Award.

  • Thomas Lee

    Thomas Lee

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Lee's principal areas of professional interest include analog circuitry of all types, ranging from low-level DC instrumentation to high-speed RF communications systems. His present research focus is on CMOS RF integrated circuit design, and on extending operation into the terahertz realm.

  • Philip Levis

    Philip Levis

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioProfessor Levis' research focuses on the design and implementation of efficient software systems for embedded wireless sensor networks; embedded network sensor architecture and design; systems programming and software engineering.

  • Michael Lepech

    Michael Lepech

    Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioProfessor Lepech's research focuses on the integration of sustainability indicators into engineering design, ranging from materials design, structural design, system design, to operations management. Such sustainability indicators include a comprehensive set of environmental, economic, and social costs. Recently his research has focused on the design of sustainable high performance fiber-reinforced cementitious composites (HPFRCCs) and fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs), the impacts of sustainable materials on building and infrastructure design and operation, and the development of new life cycle assessment (LCA) applications for building systems, transportation systems, water systems, consumer products. Along with this he is studying the effects that slowly diffusing sustainable civil engineering innovations, and the social networks they diffuse through, can have on achieving long term sustainability goals.

  • Percy Liang

    Percy Liang

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Statistics

    BioFields: machine learning, natural language processing.

    Topics: unsupervised learning, structured prediction, statistical learning theory, grounded language acquisition, compositional semantics, program induction.

    Learning semantics: Natural language allows us to express complex ideas using a few words, but the actual semantics are rarely directly observed. We therefore model the expressive semantics of language as programs whose execution produces observed data, and develop algorithms to learn these programs from indirect supervision.