School of Engineering


Showing 141-150 of 152 Results

  • Keith Winstein

    Keith Winstein

    Associate Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKeith Winstein is an associate professor of computer science and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering at Stanford University. His research group creates new kinds of networked systems by rethinking abstractions around communication, compression, and computing. Some of his group’s research has found broader use, including the Mosh tool, the Puffer video-streaming site, the Lepton compression tool, the Mahimahi network emulators, and the gg lambda-computing framework. He has received the SIGCOMM Rising Star Award, the Sloan Research Fellowship, the NSF CAREER Award, the Usenix NSDI Community Award (2020, 2017), the Usenix ATC Best Paper Award, the Applied Networking Research Prize, the SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation Award, and a Sprowls award for best doctoral thesis in computer science at MIT. Winstein previously served as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal and worked at Ksplice, a startup company (now part of Oracle) where he was the vice president of product management and business development and also cleaned the bathroom. He did his undergraduate and graduate work at MIT.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioH.-S. Philip Wong is the Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University. He joined Stanford University as Professor of Electrical Engineering in 2004. From 1988 to 2004, he was with the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. From 2018 to 2020, he was on leave from Stanford and was the Vice President of Corporate Research at TSMC, the largest semiconductor foundry in the world, and since 2020 remains the Chief Scientist of TSMC in a consulting, advisory role.

    He is a Fellow of the IEEE and received the IEEE Andrew S. Grove Award, the IEEE Technical Field Award to honor individuals for outstanding contributions to solid-state devices and technology, as well as the IEEE Electron Devices Society J.J. Ebers Award, the society’s highest honor to recognize outstanding technical contributions to the field of electron devices that have made a lasting impact.

    He is the founding Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford SystemX Alliance – an industrial affiliate program focused on building systems and the faculty director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility – a shared facility for device fabrication on the Stanford campus that serves academic, industrial, and governmental researchers across the U.S. and around the globe, sponsored in part by the National Science Foundation. He is the Principal Investigator of the Microelectronics Commons California-Pacific-Northwest AI Hardware Hub, a consortium of over 40 companies and academic institutions funded by the CHIPS Act. He is a member of the US Department of Commerce Industrial Advisory Committee on microelectronics.

  • S Simon Wong

    S Simon Wong

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioWong studies the fabrication and design of high-performance integrated circuits. His work focuses on understanding and overcoming the limitations of circuit performance imposed by device and technology.

  • Bruce A. Wooley

    Bruce A. Wooley

    The Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioBruce Wooley is the Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970, and from 1970 to 1984 he was a member of the research staff at Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 1984. At Stanford he has served as the Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, the Senior Associate Dean of Engineering and the Director of the Integrated Circuits Laboratory. His research is in the field of integrated circuit design, where his interests include low-power mixed-signal circuit design, oversampling analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, circuit design techniques for video and image data acquisition, high-speed embedded memory, high-performance packaging and testing, and circuits for wireless and wireline communications.
    Prof. Wooley is a Fellow of the IEEE and a past President of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society. He has served as the Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits and as the Chairman of both the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) and the Symposium on VLSI Circuits. Awards he has received include the University Medal from the University of California, Berkeley, the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits Best Paper Award, the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and the IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits.

  • Lei Xing

    Lei Xing

    Jacob Haimson and Sarah S. Donaldson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsartificial intelligence in medicine, medical imaging, Image-guided intervention, molecular imaging, biology guided radiation therapy (BGRT), treatment plan optimization

  • Kuang Xu

    Kuang Xu

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKuang Xu is an Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at Stanford Graduate School of Business, and Associate Professor by courtesy with the Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University. Born in Suzhou, China, he received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (2009) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (2014) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    His research primarily focuses on understanding fundamental properties and design principles of large-scale stochastic systems using tools from probability theory and optimization, with applications in queueing networks, healthcare, privacy and machine learning. He received First Place in the INFORMS George E. Nicholson Student Paper Competition (2011), the Best Paper Award, as well as the Kenneth C. Sevcik Outstanding Student Paper Award at ACM SIGMETRICS (2013), and the ACM SIGMETRICS Rising Star Research Award (2020). He currently serves as an Associate Editor for Operations Research and Management Science.

  • Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental Quantum Optics, Semiconductor Physics, Quantum Information

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current research interests include Continuous and Discrete Optimization, Algorithm Development and Analyses, Algorithmic Game/Market Theory and Mechanism-Design, Markov Decision Process and Reinforcement Learning, Dynamic/Online Optimization and Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making. These areas have been the unique and core disciplines of MS&E, and extended to new application areas in AI, Machine Learning, Data Science, and Business Analytics.

  • Serena Yeung-Levy

    Serena Yeung-Levy

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung-Levy is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung-Levy leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, and the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging. She is also a Chan Zuckerberg Biohub Investigator and has served on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.