School of Engineering


Showing 751-797 of 797 Results

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Keith Winstein

    Keith Winstein

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKeith Winstein is an assistant professor of computer science and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering at Stanford University. His research group creates new kinds of networked systems by rethinking abstractions around communication, compression, and computing. Some of his research has found broader use, including the Mosh tool, the Puffer video-streaming site, the Lepton compression tool, the Mahimahi network emulators, the gg lambda-computing framework, and the use of a temporal reordering threshold to detect packet loss. His work has received the Sloan Research Fellowship, the Usenix NSDI Community Award (2020, 2017), the Applied Networking Research Prize (2021, 2014), the Usenix ATC Best Paper Award, a Google Faculty Research Award (2017, 2015), a Facebook Faculty Award, the ACM SIGCOMM Doctoral Dissertation Award, and a Sprowls award for best doctoral thesis in computer science at MIT. Winstein previously served as a staff reporter at The Wall Street Journal, was one of the story consultants for HBO’s “Silicon Valley,” and worked at Ksplice, a startup company (now part of Oracle) where he was the vice president of product management and business development and also cleaned the bathroom. He did his undergraduate and graduate work at MIT.

  • Christina R Wodtke

    Christina R Wodtke

    Lecturer

    BioChristina Wodtke is an author, speaker, and lecturer at Stanford with insight into human innovation and high-performing teams. Her resume includes re-design and initial product offerings with LinkedIn, MySpace, Zynga, Yahoo! and others, as well as founding three startups, an online design magazine called Boxes and Arrows, and co-founding the Information Architecture Institute.

    Christina uses the power of story to connect with audiences and readers through her worldwide speaking engagements and her Amazon category-bestselling books. Her bestselling book, Radical Focus, tackles the OKR movement and startup culture with an eye to getting the right things done. Her other books include The Team that Managed Itself, Information Architecture: Blueprints for the Web and Pencil Me In (on visual thinking for the workplace.) Christina’s work is personable, insightful, knowledgeable, and engaging. Find out more information (and get your Focus worksheet) at cwodtke.com.

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioWong joined Stanford in 2004 after 16 years at IBM Research, with appointments as research staff member, Manager, and Senior Manager. While at IBM, he was responsible for shaping and executing IBM's strategy on nanoscale science and technology and silicon technology. His interests are in the area of nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid-state devices, and electronic imaging.

    His present research covers a broad range of topics including carbon electronics, 2D layered materials, wireless implantable biosensors, directed self-assembly, nanoelectromechanical relays, device modeling, brain-inspired computing, and non-volatile memory devices such as phase change memory and metal oxide resistance change memory.

  • S Simon Wong

    S Simon Wong

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research focuses on

    Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) and Integration with CMOS

    Energy Efficient Approximate Computing for Machine Learning

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Choi Yue Victoria Woo

    Choi Yue Victoria Woo

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWoo, V. (2018). With or Without You, How Family Support Can Make or Break A Business, or worse, an Entrepreneur. Paper presented at AOM Start-Up to Scale-Up Conference, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
    Woo, V. (2017). Thrive Transitional Experiences- Self-knowledge Improvisation and Transformation Quotient in a highly dynamic world. Chapter 4; Human Capital and Assets in the Networked World; ISBN: 978-1-78714-828-4
    Woo, V. (2016). Relation of Self-Knowledge and Improvisation to Thriving Transitional Experiences. Paper presented at the 18th IAMB Conference, Regent University, London, United Kingdom.
    Woo, V. (2015). Thriving In Transition: Cognitive, Social and Behavioral Resources For Times Of Change (Doctoral Dissertation).
    Woo, V. (2014) User Benefit and Adoption of Web-based Counseling Tool: Designing An Artifact using Action Research Design Methods Special Sessions Presentation at Academy of Marketing Sciences Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana
    Woo, V., Boland, R. J., Fry, R., & Lyytinen, K. (2014). Thriving in Transition Through The Lens Of Transformation Quotient: Navigational Competence Of Mobile Executives In Changing Times. Paper presented at the 18th IAMB Conference, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy.
    Woo, V., & Boland, R. J. (2013). Significant Life Changes and Changing Lives: Discovering Lived Lives of International Mobile Professionals. Paper presented at the Third Annual International Conference on Engaged Management Scholarship, Atlanta, Georgia.

  • Elijah Woolery

    Elijah Woolery

    Lecturer

    BioElijah trained in the Product Design program at Stanford University, where he now teaches as a lecturer. He has a background in photography and filmmaking, as well as product & industrial design. He is currently the Director of Design Education at InVision, a software design and collaboration platform.

    After working as a lead design engineer with Light & Motion, a vertically integrated manufacturer of consumer underwater video and photography equipment, he pursued graduate studies in marine biology at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, and co-founded the print magazine Wetpixel Quarterly in 2007. He was a founder in the second class of Innovation Endeavor's Runway Program, a venture-backed startup accelerator backed by Eric Schmidt's fund.

    He also founded Out of the Deep Blue, a design consultancy, where he worked on web and mobile applications for clients like Genentech and Kaiser Permanente. As a life-long worshiper of the ocean, he loves to surf, dive, and kayak.

  • Bruce A. Wooley

    Bruce A. Wooley

    The Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioBruce Wooley is the Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1970, and from 1970 to 1984 he was a member of the research staff at Bell Laboratories in Holmdel, NJ. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 1984. At Stanford he has served as the Chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering, the Senior Associate Dean of Engineering and the Director of the Integrated Circuits Laboratory. His research is in the field of integrated circuit design, where his interests include low-power mixed-signal circuit design, oversampling analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, circuit design techniques for video and image data acquisition, high-speed embedded memory, high-performance packaging and testing, and circuits for wireless and wireline communications.
    Prof. Wooley is a Fellow of the IEEE and a past President of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Society. He has served as the Editor of the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits and as the Chairman of both the International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC) and the Symposium on VLSI Circuits. Awards he has received include the University Medal from the University of California, Berkeley, the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits Best Paper Award, the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the EECS Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and the IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits.

  • Jiajun Wu

    Jiajun Wu

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    BioJiajun Wu is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University, working on computer vision, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. Before joining Stanford, he was a Visiting Faculty Researcher at Google Research. He received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and undergraduate degrees in Computer Science and in Economics at Tsinghua University. Wu's research has been recognized through the ACM Doctoral Dissertation Award Honorable Mention, the MIT George M. Sprowls PhD Thesis Award in Artificial Intelligence and Decision-Making, the IROS Best Paper Award on Cognitive Robotics, and fellowships from Facebook, Nvidia, Samsung, and Adobe.

  • Lei Xing

    Lei Xing

    Jacob Haimson Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsartificial intelligence in medicine, Image-guided intervention, molecular imaging, biologically conformable radiation threapy (BCRT), treatment plan optimization, optimization, application of molecular imaging to radiation oncology.

  • Kuang Xu

    Kuang Xu

    Associate Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Graduate School of Business and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKuang Xu was born in Suzhou, China. He received the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering (2009) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA, and the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (2014) from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. He was a postdoctoral fellow at the Microsoft Research-Inria Joint Center in Paris, France (2014-2015).

    His research interests lie in the fields of applied probability theory, optimization, and operations research, seeking to understand fundamental properties and design principles of large-scale stochastic systems, with applications in queueing networks, healthcare, privacy and statistical learning theory. He has received several awards including a First Place in INFORMS George E. Nicholson Student Paper Competition, a Best Paper Award, as well as a Kenneth C. Sevcik Outstanding Student Paper Award from ACM SIGMETRICS.

  • Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Yoshihisa Yamamoto

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Applied Physics, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental Quantum Optics, Semiconductor Physics, Quantum Information

  • Daniel Yamins

    Daniel Yamins

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab's research lies at intersection of neuroscience, artificial intelligence, psychology and large-scale data analysis. It is founded on two mutually reinforcing hypotheses:

    H1. By studying how the brain solves computational challenges, we can learn to build better artificial intelligence algorithms.

    H2. Through improving artificial intelligence algorithms, we'll discover better models of how the brain works.

    We investigate these hypotheses using techniques from computational modeling and artificial intelligence, high-throughput neurophysiology, functional brain imaging, behavioral psychophysics, and large-scale data analysis.

  • Fan Yang

    Fan Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research seeks to understand how microenvironmental cues regulate stem cell fate, and to develop novel biomaterials and stem cell-based therapeutics for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Our work spans from fundamental science, technology development, to translational research.We are particularly interested in developing better therapies for treating musculoskeletal diseases, cardiovascular diseases and cancer.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioYinyu Ye is currently the Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering at the Department of Management Science and Engineering and Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering and the Director of the MS&E Industrial Affiliates Program, Stanford University. He received the B.S. degree in System Engineering from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research from Stanford University. Ye's research interests lie in the areas of optimization, complexity theory, algorithm design and analysis, and applications of mathematical programming, operations research and system engineering. He is also interested in developing optimization software for various real-world applications. Current research topics include Liner Programming Algorithms, Markov Decision Processes, Computational Game/Market Equilibrium, Metric Distance Geometry, Dynamic Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making, etc. He is an INFORMS (The Institute for Operations Research and The Management Science) Fellow, and has received several research awards including the winner of the 2014 SIAG/Optimization Prize awarded every three years to the author(s) of the most outstanding paper, the inaugural 2012 ISMP Tseng Lectureship Prize for outstanding contribution to continuous optimization, the 2009 John von Neumann Theory Prize for fundamental sustained contributions to theory in Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the inaugural 2006 Farkas prize on Optimization, and the 2009 IBM Faculty Award. He has supervised numerous doctoral students at Stanford who received received the 2015 and 2013 Second Prize of INFORMS Nicholson Student Paper Competition, the 2013 INFORMS Computing Society Prize, the 2008 Nicholson Prize, and the 2006 and 2010 INFORMS Optimization Prizes for Young Researchers. Ye teaches courses on Optimization, Network and Integer Programming, Semidefinite Programming, etc. He has written extensively on Interior-Point Methods, Approximation Algorithms, Conic Optimization, and their applications; and served as a consultant or technical board member to a variety of industries, including MOSEK.

  • Serena Yeung

    Serena Yeung

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    BioDr. Serena Yeung is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Her research focus is on developing artificial intelligence and machine learning algorithms to enable new capabilities in biomedicine and healthcare. She has extensive expertise in deep learning and computer vision, and has developed computer vision algorithms for analyzing diverse types of visual data ranging from video capture of human behavior, to medical images and cell microscopy images.

    Dr. Yeung leads the Medical AI and Computer Vision Lab at Stanford. She is affiliated with the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, the Clinical Excellence Research Center, the Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging, the Center for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Bio-X. She also serves on the NIH Advisory Committee to the Director Working Group on Artificial Intelligence.

  • Paul Yock, MD

    Paul Yock, MD

    The Martha Meier Weiland Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHealth technology innovation using the Biodesign process: a systematic approach to the design of biomedical technologies based on detailed clinical and economic needs characterization. New approaches for interdisciplinary training of health technology innovators, including processes for identifying value opportunities in creating new technology-based approaches to health care.

  • Do Yeung Yoon

    Do Yeung Yoon

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSee the CV

  • Howard Zebker

    Howard Zebker

    Professor of Electrical Engineering and of Geophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My students and I study the surfaces of Earth and planets using radar remote sensing methods. Our specialization is interferometric radar, or InSAR. InSAR is a technique to measure mm-scale surface deformation at fine resolution over wide areas, and much of our work follows from applying this technique to the study of earthquakes, volcanoes, and human-induced subsidence. We also address global environmental problems by tracking the movement of ice in the polar regions. whose ice mass balance affects sea level rise and global climate. We participate in NASA space missions such as Cassini, in which we now are examining the largest moon of Saturn, Titan, to try and deduce its composition and evolution. Our work includes experimental observation and modeling the measurements to best understand processes affecting the Earth and solar system. We use data acquired by spaceborne satellites and by large, ground-based radar telescopes to support our research.

    Teaching
    I teach courses related to remote sensing methods and applications, and how these methods can be used to study the world around us. At the undergraduate level, these include introductory remote sensing uses of the full electromagnetic spectrum to characterize Earth and planetary surfaces and atmospheres, and methods of digital image processing. I also teach a freshman and sophomore seminar course on natural hazards. At the graduate level, the courses are more specialized, including the math and physics of two-dimensional imaging systems, plus detailed ourses on imaging radar systems for geophysical applications.

    Professional Activities
    InSAR Review Board, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (2006-present); editorial board, IEEE Proceedings (2005-present); NRC Earth Science and Applications from Space Panel on Solid Earth Hazards, Resources, and Dynamics (2005-present); Chair, Western North America InSAR (WInSAR) Consortium (2004-06); organizing committee, NASA/NSF/USGS InSAR working group; International Union of Radioscience (URSI) Board of Experts for Medal Evaluations (2004-05); National Astronomy and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo Observatory, Visiting Committee, (2002-04; chair, 2003-04); NASA Alaska SAR Facility users working group (2000-present); associate editor, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing (1998-present); fellow, IEEE (1998)

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

  • Roseanna N. Zia

    Roseanna N. Zia

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Mechanical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Zia group seeks to unite the deeply connected fields of suspension mechanics and cell biology, to show the role of physics in biological cell fitness. With theory and computation we ask:
    1. Is Brownian motion alone sufficient to power life-essential processes in biological cells, and how does this connect cell fitness or even to the origin of life?
    2. Do colloidal phase transitions really arrest?
    3. Can Einstein's fluctuation-dissipation theory be expanded well beyond equilibrium?

  • Stephen Zoepf

    Stephen Zoepf

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Stephen Zoepf is the Executive Director of the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford. He holds a Ph.D., M.Sc. and B.Sc. from MIT. His interests are in future mobility, shared vehicle systems, transportation energy usage and policy. He has eight years of experience in the automotive industry as an engineer and product manager at BMW and Ford, and previously led U.S. Department of Transportation efforts to integrate confidential data submissions efforts into national vehicle energy policy modeling efforts. He was an ENI Energy Initiative Fellow and a Martin Energy Fellow at MIT and a recipient of the Barry McNutt award from the Energy and Alternative Fuels Committees of the Transportation Research Board. He also won the Singapore Global Challenge, Global Young Scientists Summit@one-north in 2013 and was a recipient of MIT's Infinite Mile Award for Outstanding Service to the Institute.'

  • James Zou

    James Zou

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Computer Science and of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy group works on both foundations of statistical machine learning and applications in biomedicine and healthcare. We develop new technologies that make ML more accountable to humans, more reliable/robust and reveals core scientific insights.

    We want our ML to be impactful and beneficial, and as such, we are deeply motivated by transformative applications in biotech and health. We collaborate with and advise many academic and industry groups.