School of Engineering


Showing 11-20 of 75 Results

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Karl Deisseroth

    Karl Deisseroth

    D. H. Chen Professor, Professor of Bioengineering and of Psychiatry and of Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch in Dr. Deisseroth's laboratory focuses on developing optical, molecular and cellular tools to observe, perturb, and re-engineer brain circuits. His laboratory is based in the James H. Clark Center at Stanford and has developed optogenetic and tissue engineering methods, employing techniques spanning electrophysiology, molecular biology, optics, neural activity imaging, animal behavior, and computational neural network modeling.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design new medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging technology development including MRI and microendoscopy. Biomedical technology development.

  • Drew¬†Endy

    Drew Endy

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe work to strengthen the foundations and expand the frontiers of synthetic biology. Our foundational work includes (i) advancing reliable reuse of bio-measurements and -materials via standards that enable coordination of labor, and (ii) developing and integrating measurement and modeling tools for representing and analyzing living matter at whole-cell scales. Our work beyond the frontiers of current practice includes (iii) bootstrapping biotechnology tools in unconventional organisms (e.g., mealworms, wood fungus, skin microbes), and (iv) exploring the limits of whole-genome recoding and building cells from scratch. We also support strategy and policy work related to bio-safety, security, economy, equity, justice, and leadership.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Michael Fischbach

    Michael Fischbach

    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

    BioMichael Fischbach is an Associate Professor in the Department of Bioengineering at Stanford University, an institute scholar of Stanford ChEM-H, and the director of the Stanford Microbiome Therapies Initiative. Fischbach is a recipient of the NIH Director's Pioneer and New Innovator Awards, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholars Award, a Fellowship for Science and Engineering from the David and Lucille Packard Foundation, a Medical Research Award from the W.M. Keck Foundation, a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease award, and a Glenn Award for Research in Biological Mechanisms of Aging. His laboratory uses a combination of genomics and chemistry to identify and characterize small molecules from microbes, with an emphasis on the human microbiome. Fischbach received his Ph.D. as a John and Fannie Hertz Foundation Fellow in chemistry from Harvard in 2007, where he studied the role of iron acquisition in bacterial pathogenesis and the biosynthesis of antibiotics. After two years as an independent fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital, Fischbach joined the faculty at UCSF, where he founded his lab before moving to Stanford in 2017. Fischbach is a co-founder and director of Federation Bio, a co-founder of Revolution Medicines, and a member of the scientific advisory board of NGM Biopharmaceuticals.

  • Polly Fordyce

    Polly Fordyce

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Fordyce Lab is focused on developing new instrumentation and assays for making quantitative, systems-scale biophysical measurements of molecular interactions. Current research in the lab is focused on three main platforms: (1) arrays of valved reaction chambers for high-throughput protein expression and characterization, (2) spectrally encoded beads for multiplexed bioassays, and (3) sortable droplets and microwells for single-cell assays.