School of Engineering


Showing 41-55 of 55 Results

  • Zihao Ou

    Zihao Ou

    Physical Science Research Scientist

    BioMy research interests have been focusing on how individual building blocks come together resulting in complex functions which are hard to predict, if possible, from the individual identities. Similar to a digital screen displaying a movie, the complicated pattern and story can hardly be interpreted from the dynamic traces of a single pixel. Specifically, I have been studying the general topic of self-assembly and non-equilibrium behaviors in soft matter systems, using both experimental and simulation tools.

    I obtained my B.S. degree in physics from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) in 2015. In my undergraduate research, I tried to use computer simulation to study multiple systems in Prof. Zhonghuai Hou’s group, such as the Viscek model for self-propelled particles. In 2014, I visited Oxford University to study the phase behaviors of active nematics using Lattice-Boltzmann method in Prof. Julia M. Yeomans' group. In 2020, I obtained my Ph.D. degree in Materials Science and Engineering at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) under the supervision of Prof. Qian Chen. During my Ph.D. research, we illustrated the nonclassical crystallization pathway of nanoparticles (Nat. Mater., 19, 450–455, 2020) and supracrystal growth kinetics (Nat. Commun., 11, 4555, 2020) using liquid-phase TEM. I also studied other nonequilibrium behaviors in novel colloidal systems, such as shape transformation of metal-organic framework crystals during chemical etching (ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces, 10, 48, 40990–40995, 2018), application of ferromagnetic colloids in inductor design (Science Adv., 6, 3, eaay4508, 2020) and electron transport in redox-active colloids.

    In August 2020, I joined Prof. Guosong Hong’s group at the materials science and engineering department at Stanford University to develop novel nanomaterials that can interact with neurons at the subcellular level. Armed with the knowledge of nanotechnology and theoretical modeling, we are extending the tools that can be used to investigate the challenging questions in neuroscience.

  • Jim Plummer

    Jim Plummer

    John M. Fluke Professor of Electrical Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGenerally studies the governing physics and fabrication technology of silicon integrated circuits, including the scaling limits of silicon technology, and the application of silicon technology outside traditional integrated circuits, including power switching devices such as IGBTs. Process simulation tools like SUPREM for simulating fabrication. Recent work has focused on wide bandgap semiconductor materials, particularly SiC and GaN, for power control devices.

  • Eric Pop

    Eric Pop

    Pease-Ye Professor, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Pop Lab explores problems at the intersection of nanoelectronics and nanoscale energy conversion. These include fundamental limits of current and heat flow, energy-efficient transistors and memory, and energy harvesting via thermoelectrics. The Pop Lab also works with novel nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes, graphene, BN, MoS2, and their device applications, through an approach that is experimental, computational and highly collaborative.

  • Friedrich Prinz

    Friedrich Prinz

    Leonardo Professor, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, of Materials Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioFritz Prinz is the Leonardo Professor in the School of Engineering at Stanford University, Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy. He also serves as the Director of the Nanoscale Prototyping Laboratory and Faculty Co-director of the NPL-Affiliate Program. A solid-state physicist by training, Prinz leads a group of doctoral students, postdoctoral scholars, and visiting scholars who are addressing fundamental issues on energy conversion and storage at the nanoscale. In his Laboratory, a wide range of nano-fabrication technologies are employed to build prototype fuel cells and capacitors with induced topological electronic states. We are testing these concepts and novel material structures through atomic layer deposition, scanning tunneling microscopy, impedance spectroscopy and other technologies. In addition, the Prinz group group uses atomic scale modeling to gain insights into the nature of charge separation and recombination processes. Before coming to Stanford in 1994, he was on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Prinz earned a PhD in Physics at the University of Vienna.

  • Alberto Salleo

    Alberto Salleo

    Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNovel materials and processing techniques for large-area and flexible electronic/photonic devices. Polymeric materials for electronics, bioelectronics, and biosensors. Electrochemical devices for neuromorphic computing. Defects and structure/property studies of polymeric semiconductors, nano-structured and amorphous materials in thin films. Advanced characterization techniques for soft matter.

  • Krishna Saraswat

    Krishna Saraswat

    Rickey/Nielsen Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNew and innovative materials, structures, and process technology of semiconductor devices, interconnects for nanoelectronics and solar cells.

  • Bob Sinclair

    Bob Sinclair

    Charles M. Pigott Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioUsing high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Sinclair studies microelectronic and magnetic thin film microstructure.

  • Yuri Suzuki

    Yuri Suzuki

    Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHer interests are focused on novel ground states and functional properties in condensed matter systems synthesized via atomically precise thin film deposition techniques with a recent emphasis has been on highly correlated electronic systems:
    • Emergent interfacial electronic & magnetic phenomena through complex oxide heteroepitaxy
    • Low dimensional electron gas systems
    • Spin current generation, propagation and control in complex oxide-based ferromagnets
    • Multifunctional behavior in complex oxide thin films and heterostructures

  • Keiko Waki

    Keiko Waki

    Visiting Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering

    BioKeiko Waki, as an associate professor of Tokyo Institute of Technology (TIT) in Japan, has worked extensively with her group on controlling the defects of carbon nanotubes and nano materials for integrating new materials into emerging technologies in the field of fuel cells and solar cells. Now, she is working with Prof. Dauskardt's group in Stanford Materials Science and Engineering on the plasma-assisted film processing for various device technologies as a visiting associate professor.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsShan Wang was named the Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering in 2018. He directs the Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology and is a leading expert in biosensors, information storage and spintronics. His research and inventions span across a variety of areas including magnetic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cancer biomarkers, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic sensors, magnetoresistive random access memory, and magnetic integrated inductors.

  • Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Yunzhi Peter Yang

    Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsYang’ lab's research interests are in the areas of bio-inspired biomaterials, medical devices, and 3D printing approaches for re-creating a suitable microenvironment for cell growth and tissue regeneration for musculoskeletal disease diagnosis and treatment, including multiple tissue healing such as rotator cuff injury, orthopedic diseases such as osteoporosis and osteonecrosis, and orthopedic traumas such as massive bone and muscle injuries.

  • Renee Zhao

    Renee Zhao

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioRuike Renee Zhao is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University where she directs the Soft Intelligent Materials Laboratory. Renee received her BS degree from Xi'an Jiaotong University in 2012, and her MS and PhD degrees from Brown University in 2014 and 2016, respectively. She was a postdoc associate at MIT during 2016-2018 prior to her appointment as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at The Ohio State University from 2018 to 2021.

    Renee’s research focuses on the development of stimuli-responsive soft composites for multifunctional robotic systems with integrated shape-changing, assembling, sensing, and navigation. By combining mechanics, polymer engineering, and advanced material manufacturing techniques, the functional soft composites enable applications in soft robotics, miniaturized biomedical devices, flexible electronics, and deployable and morphing structures.

    Renee is a recipient of the ARO Early Career Program (ECP) Award (2023), AFOSR Young Investigator Research Program (YIP) Award (2023), Eshelby Mechanics Award for Young Faculty (2022), ASME Henry Hess Early Career Publication Award (2022), ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal (2022), ASME Applied Mechanics Division Journal of Applied Mechanics Award (2021), NSF Career Award (2020), and ASME Applied Mechanics Division Haythornthwaite Research Initiation Award (2018).

  • Xiaolin Zheng

    Xiaolin Zheng

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering, of Energy Science Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Zheng received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, Professor Zheng did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Professor Zheng is a member of MRS, ACS and combustion institute. Professor Zheng received the TR35 Award from the MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Grant Award (2013), the Presidential Early Career Award (PECASE) from the white house (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008), DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).