School of Engineering


Showing 21-30 of 55 Results

  • Ian Fisher

    Ian Fisher

    Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the study of quantum materials with unconventional magnetic & electronic ground states & phase transitions. Emphasis on design and discovery of new materials. Recent focus on use of strain as a probe of, and tuning parameter for, a variety of electronic states. Interests include unconventional superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, nematicity, multipolar order, instabilities of low-dimensional materials and quantum magnetism.

  • Kenneth Goodson

    Kenneth Goodson

    Senior Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, Davies Family Provostial Professor, and Professor, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Goodson’s Nanoheat Lab studies heat transfer in electronic nanostructures, microfluidic heat sinks, and packaging, focussing on basic transport physics and practical impact for industry. We work closely with companies on novel cooling and packaging strategies for power devices, portables, ASICs, & data centers. At present, sponsors and collaborators include ARPA-E, the NSF POETS Center, SRC ASCENT, Google, Intel, Toyota, Ford, among others.

  • Wendy Gu

    Wendy Gu

    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioThe Gu Group studies the mechanical behavior of nanomaterials. We work at the intersection of solid mechanics, materials science and nano-chemistry. We research the unique properties of nanoscale metals, ceramics and nano-architected composites in order to design strong, tough and lightweight structural materials, materials for extreme environments, and mechanically-actuated sensors. Our experimental tools include nanoindentation, electron microscopy, and colloidal synthesis.

  • Guosong Hong

    Guosong Hong

    Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioGuosong Hong's research aims to bridge materials science and neuroscience, and blur the distinction between the living and non-living worlds by developing novel neuroengineering tools to interrogate and manipulate the brain. Specifically, the Hong lab is currently developing ultrasound, infrared, and radiofrequency-based in-vivo neural interfaces with minimal invasiveness, high spatiotemporal resolution, and cell-type specificity.

    Dr. Guosong Hong received his PhD in chemistry from Stanford University in 2014, and then carried out postdoctoral studies with at Harvard University. Dr. Hong joined Stanford Materials Science and Engineering and Neurosciences Institute as an assistant professor in 2018. He is a recipient of the NIH Pathway to Independence (K99/R00) Award, the MIT Technology Review ‘35 Innovators Under 35’ Award, the Science PINS Prize for Neuromodulation, the NSF CAREER Award, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching, and the Rita Allen Foundation Scholars Award.

  • Robert Huggins

    Robert Huggins

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Huggins joined Stanford as Assistant Professor in 1954, was promoted to Associate Professor in 1958, and to Professor in 1962.

    His research activities have included studies of imperfections in crystals, solid-state reaction kinetics, ferromagnetism, mechanical behavior of solids, crystal growth, and a wide variety of topics in physical metallurgy, ceramics, solid state chemistry and electrochemistry. Primary attention has recently been focused on the development of understanding of solid state ionic phenomena involving solid electrolytes and mixed ionic-electronic conducting materials containing atomic or ionic species such as lithium, sodium or oxygen with unusually high mobility, as well as their use in novel battery and fuel cell systems, electrochromic optical devices, sensors, and in enhanced heterogeneous catalysis. He was also involved in the development of the understanding of the key role played by the phase composition and oxygen stoichiometry in determining the properties of high temperature oxide superconductors.

    Topics of particular recent interest have been related to energy conversion and storage, including hydrogen transport and hydride formation in metals, alloys and intermetallic compounds, and various aspects of materials and phenomena related to advanced lithium batteries.

    He has over 400 professional publications, including three books; "Advanced Batteries", published by Springer in 2009, "Energy Storage", published by Springer in 2010, and Energy Storage, Second Edition in 2016.

  • Felipe Jornada

    Felipe Jornada

    Assistant Professor of Materials Science and Engineering

    BioFelipe Jornada's research aims at predicting and understanding excited-state phenomena in quantum and energy materials. In order to make reliable predictions on novel materials, he relies on high-performance computer calculations based on parameter-free, quantum-mechanical theories that are developed in his group. He is interested in studying fundamental aspects of these excitations – their lifetimes, dynamics, and stability/binding energies – and how they can be engineered in novel materials, such as nanostructured and low-dimensional systems. His ultimate goal is to use insights from atomistic calculations to rationally design new materials with applications in energy research, electronics, optoelectronics, and quantum technologies.

    Felipe received his Ph.D. degree in physics from UC Berkeley in 2017 under the advice of Prof. Steven G. Louie. His Ph.D. research focused on the prediction of the electronic and optical properties of new quasi-two-dimensional materials, such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides. In his postdoc, he studied a number of problems related to multiparticle excitations in low-dimensional materials, including biexcitons and plasmons. Felipe joined the Stanford faculty in January 2020 and an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering.

  • Aaron Lindenberg

    Aaron Lindenberg

    Professor of Materials Science and Engineering and of Photon Science

    BioLindenberg's research is focused on visualizing the ultrafast dynamics and atomic-scale structure of materials on femtosecond and picosecond time-scales. X-ray and electron scattering and spectroscopic techniques are combined with ultrafast optical techniques to provide a new way of taking snapshots of materials in motion. Current research is focused on the dynamics of phase transitions, ultrafast properties of nanoscale materials, and charge transport, with a focus on materials for information storage technologies, energy-related materials, and nanoscale optoelectronic devices.