School of Engineering


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  • Michael Steep

    Michael Steep

    Adjunct Professor

    BioMichael Steep is a senior global executive specializing in operational excellence, innovation leadership, business development, and sales. In January of 2017, he left Xerox PARC as SVP and founded Stanford’s newest corporate affiliate program at the School of Engineering. He now serves Stanford University as Executive Director for a new center on Disruptive Technologies and Digital Cities. He is also serving as an Adjunct Professor of Engineering at the school. Throughout his career as an operating executive, he has successfully built, managed, and transformed international organizations by leveraging the power of emerging technologies to deliver fully-integrated, scalable, and practical approaches to innovation. Mr. Steep excels at leveraging strategic alliances and an extensive, high-level network to drive new revenue opportunities. His strengths include executing a broad range of technology initiatives and joint ventures in areas of big data, predictive algorithms, cloud, location-based services, and mobile. He also serves on the London Smart City Board of Directors.

    Before joining Stanford in 2017, Mr. Steep worked as Senior Vice President of Global Business Operations at PARC, a Xerox Company. As SVP, he oversaw corporate and P&L management for Commercial and innovation services - with a focus on transforming their commercial business model into a sustainable growth engine. He also managed business development, sales, corporate strategy, intellectual property, marketing, and strategic alliances. While at PARC, he helped Fortune Group companies transform early stage technologies into new revenue-generating business models crossing predictive analytics, AI, privacy preserving analytics, and radical new hardware technologies for low-cost sensor development used in autonomous vehicles and IoT. He also developed new approaches for car companies to understand human behavior and emotion through imaging technologies.

    From 2005 to 2011, Mr. Steep worked at Microsoft in executive roles including Global Managing Director in the Office of the CTO - Bill Gates. While in this role, he was integral in setting the overall vision for customer-driven Microsoft innovation, capitalizing on emerging technologies and industry breakthroughs in smartphone, tablet, and cloud. His prior role at Microsoft included overseeing a $1.5B global enterprise sales organization.

    Prior to Microsoft, he held various leadership roles including VP at IBM (Lexmark), and Chief Operating Officer at ENCAD where he turned around the public company resulting in its successful sale to Kodak. He also drove top-line, international revenue growth at Lexmark and launched 30+ products at Apple including the first consumer digital camera and other imaging products.

    Mr. Steep holds a Master of Business Administration from the Darden School of Business and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Pennsylvania. In addition to his extensive corporate experience, he is a Distinguished Speaker at Imperial College London. Mike is often retained as a keynote speaker with Leading Authorities speaking on the topic of disruptive technologies and new business models. This year he is scheduled to speak across the country on that topic to a dozen CEO conference events. He is also an editor at Forbes Online. He currently resides in the San Francisco Bay Area and was appointed to the London Smart City Board in 2014.

  • Robert Street

    Robert Street

    William Alden and Martha Campbell Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStreet focuses on numerical simulations related to geophysical fluid motions. His research considers the modeling of turbulence in fluid flows, which are often stratified, and includes numerical simulation of coastal upwelling, internal waves and sediment transport in coastal regions, flow in rivers, valley winds, and the planetary boundary layer.

  • Anand Subramani

    Anand Subramani

    Lecturer

    BioVP of Product Management at Pilot.com

  • Jenny Suckale

    Jenny Suckale

    Assistant Professor of Geophysics and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioBefore joining Stanford in January 2014, I held a position as Lecturer in Applied Mathematics and as a Ziff Environmental Fellow at Harvard. I hold a PhD in Geophysics from MIT and a Master in Public Administration from the Harvard Kennedy School. Prior to joining graduate school, I worked as a scientific consultant for different international organizations aiming to reduce the impact of natural and environmental disasters in vulnerable communities. The goal of my research is to advance our basic understanding and predictive capabilities of complex multi-phase flows that are fundamental to Earth science. I pursue this goal by developing original computational methods customized for the problem at hand. The phenomena I explore range from the microscopic to the planetary scale and space a wide variety of geophysics systems such as volcanoes, glaciers, and magma oceans. I have taught both undergraduate and graduate courses in scientific, planetary evolution, and natural disasters. Since arriving at Stanford in January 2014, I have co-taught GES 118, Understanding Natural Hazards, Quantifying Risk, Increasing Resilience in Highly Urbanized Regions

  • Robert Sutton

    Robert Sutton

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering and, by courtesy, of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    BioRobert Sutton is Professor of Management Science and Engineering and a Professor of Organizational Behavior (by courtesy) at Stanford. Sutton has been teaching classes on the psychology of business and management at Stanford since 1983. He is co-founder of the Center for Work, Technology and Organization, which he co-directed from 1996 to 2006. He is also co-founder of the Stanford Technology Ventures Program and the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (which everyone calls “the d school”). Sutton and Stanford Business School's Huggy Rao recently launched the Designing Organizational Change Project, which is hosted by the Stanford Technology Ventures Program

    Sutton studies innovation, leadership, the links between managerial knowledge and organization action, scaling excellence, and workplace dynamics. He has published over 100 articles and chapters on these topics in peer-reviewed journals and the popular press. Sutton’s books include Weird Ideas That Work: 11 ½ Practices for Promoting, Managing, and Sustaining Innovation, The Knowing-Doing Gap: How Smart Firms Turn Knowledge into Action (with Jeffrey Pfeffer), and Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense: Profiting from Evidence-Based Management (with Jeffrey Pfeffer). The No Asshole Rule: Building a Civilized Workplace and Surviving One That Isn’t and Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…. and Survive the Worst are both New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestsellers. His last book, Scaling-Up Excellence: Getting to More without Settling for Less (with Huggy Rao), was published in 2014 and is a Wall Street Journal and Publisher’s Weekly bestseller. Sutton's next book, The Asshole Survival Guide: How to Deal With People Who Treat You Like Dirt, will be published in September of 2017.

    Professor Sutton’s honors include the award for the best paper published in the Academy of Management Journal in 1989, the Eugene L. Grant Award for Excellence in Teaching, selection by Business 2.0 as a leading “management guru” in 2002, and the award for the best article published in the Academy of Management Review in 2005. Hard Facts, Dangerous Half-Truths, and Total Nonsense was selected as the best business book of 2006 by the Toronto Globe and Mail. Sutton was named as one of 10 “B-School All-Stars” by BusinessWeek , which they described as “professors who are influencing contemporary business thinking far beyond academia.” In 2014, the London Business School honored Sutton with the Sumantra Ghoshal Award for Rigour and Relevance in the Study of Management.

    Sutton is a Fellow at IDEO, a Senior Scientist at Gallup, and academic director of two Stanford executive education programs:Customer-Focused Innovation and the online Stanford Innovation and Entrepreneurship Certificate. His personal website is at www.bobsutton.net and he also blogs at Harvard Business Review and as an “influencer” on LinkedIn. Sutton tweets @work_matters.

  • James Swartz

    James Swartz

    James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    BioUsing and Understanding Cell-Free Biology

    Swartz Lab General Research Focus:

    The current and projected research in the Swartz lab balances basic research in microbial metabolism, protein expression, and protein folding with a strong emphasis on compelling applications. The power and versatility of cell-free methods coupled with careful evaluation and engineering of these new systems enables a whole new range of applications and scientific investigation. Fundamental research on: the mechanisms and kinetics of ribosomal function, fundamental bioenergetics, basic mechanisms of protein folding, functional genomics, and metabolic pathway analysis is motivated by a variety of near- and medium term applications spanning medicine, energy, and environmental needs.

    Swartz Lab Application Focus:

    In the medical area , current research addresses the need for patient-specific vaccines to treat cancer. Particularly for lymphomas, there is a strong need to be able to make a new cancer vaccine for each patient. Current technologies are not practical for this demanding task, but cell-free approaches are rapid and inexpensive. We have already demonstrated feasibility in mouse tumor challenge studies and are now expanding the range of applications and working to improve the relevant technologies. Experience with these vaccines has also suggested a new and exciting format for making inexpensive and very potent vaccines for general use.

    To address pressing needs for a new and cleaner energy source, we are working towards an organism that can efficiently capture solar energy and convert it into hydrogen. The first task is to develop an oxygen tolerant hydrogenase using cell-free technology to express libraries of mutated enzymes that can be rapidly screened for improved function. Even though these are very complex enzymes, we have produced active hydrogenases with our cell-free methods. We are now perfecting the screening methods for rapid and accurate identification of improved enzymes. After these new enzymes are identified, the project will progress toward metabolic engineering and bioreactor design research to achieve the scales and economies required.

    To address environmental needs, we are developing an improved water filters using an amazing membrane protein, Aquaporin Z. It has the ability to reject all other chemicals and ions except water. We have efficiently expressed the protein into lipid bilayer vesicles and are now working to cast these membranes on porous supports to complete the development of a new and powerful water purification technology. The same lessons will be applied toward the development of a new class of biosensors that brings high sensitivity and selectivity.

  • James Sweeney

    James Sweeney

    Professor of Management Science & Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeterminants of energy efficiency opportunities, barriers, and policy options. Emphasis on behavioral issues, including personal, corporate, or organizational. Behavior may be motivated by economic incentives, social, or cultural factors, or more generally, by a combination of these factors. Systems analysis questions of energy use.

  • Li-Yang Tan

    Li-Yang Tan

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTheoretical computer science, with an emphasis on complexity theory

  • Sindy Tang

    Sindy Tang

    Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Radiology (Precision Health and Integrated Diagnostics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab is dedicated to solving problems at the interface of engineering, soft matter, and biology. Current focus includes microfluidics fundamentals and applications in disease diagnostics (e.g., tuberculosis, sepsis, allergy), and single-cell wound repair and learning. For details see https://web.stanford.edu/group/tanglab/

  • William Abraham Tarpeh

    William Abraham Tarpeh

    Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioReimagining liquid waste streams as resources can lead to recovery of valuable products and more efficient, less costly approaches to reducing harmful discharges to the environment. Pollutants in effluent streams can be captured and used as valuable inputs to other processes. For example, municipal wastewater contains resources like energy, water, nutrients, and metals. The Tarpeh Lab develops and evaluates novel approaches to resource recovery from “waste” waters at several synergistic scales: molecular mechanisms of chemical transport and transformation; novel unit processes that increase resource efficiency; and systems-level assessments that identify optimization opportunities. We employ understanding of electrochemistry, separations, thermodynamics, kinetics, and reactor design to preferentially recover resources from waste. We leverage these molecular-scale insights to increase the sustainability of engineered processes in terms of energy, environmental impact, and cost.

  • Clyde Tatum

    Clyde Tatum

    Obayashi Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioTatum's teaching interests are construction engineering and technical construction. His research focuses on construction process knowledge and integration and innovation in construction.

  • Hamdi Tchelepi

    Hamdi Tchelepi

    Professor of Energy Resources Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research activities include: (1) modeling unstable miscible and immiscible flows in heterogeneous formations, (2) developing multiscale formulations and scalable linear/nonlinear solution algorithms for multiphase flow in large-scale subsurface systems, and (3) developing stochastic approaches for quantifying the uncertainty associated with predictions of subsurface flow performance.

  • Leif Thomas

    Leif Thomas

    Associate Professor of Earth System Science and, by courtesy, of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhysical oceanography; theory and numerical modeling of the ocean circulation; dynamics of ocean fronts and vortices; upper ocean processes; air-sea interaction.

  • Sebastien Tilmans

    Sebastien Tilmans

    Director of Operations

    BioSebastien is the Director of Operations at the Codiga Resource Recovery Center at Stanford University, a test-bed facility dedicated to accelerating the scale-up of innovative resource recovery systems. Prior to joining Stanford, he worked in the Process Engineering group at Oceanside Wastewater Treatment Plant for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. He has also designed and implemented several decentralized anaerobic wastewater treatment systems in Panama, and a waterless sanitation service in Haiti. He holds a PhD in Environmental Engineering from Stanford University, and a B.E. in Civil Engineering from Cooper Union. He was a Fulbright scholar, an NDSEG fellow, and an EPA STAR fellow.

  • Fouad Tobagi

    Fouad Tobagi

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioTobagi works on network control mechanisms for handling multimedia traffic (voice, video and TCP- based applications) and on the performance assessment of networked multimedia applications using user-perceived quality measures. He also investigates the design of wireless networks, including QoS-based media access control and network resource management, as well as network architectures and infrastructures for the support of mobile users, all meeting the requirements of multimedia traffic. He also investigates the design of metropolitan and wide area networks combining optical and electronic networking technologies, including topological design, capacity provisioning, and adaptive routing.

  • Joseph D. Towles

    Joseph D. Towles

    Lecturer

    BioJoseph Towles is a Lecturer jointly appointed in the Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering Departments at Stanford University. Joe’s teaching interests are in the areas of solid mechanics, neuromuscular biomechanics, dynamical systems and control, and engineering design. His scholarship interest is in the area of engineering education. Specifically, Joe's engineering education activities include student-centric course and curricular development; assessment of student learning & engagement; and innovation in approaches to enhance student learning.

    A Mechanical Engineer by training, Joe earned his BS degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maryland Baltimore County and his MS and PhD degrees both in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (1996-2003). Following graduate school, Joe was a research post-doctoral fellow and subsequently a research scientist and then a research assistant professor in neuromuscular biomechanics in the Sensory Motor Performance Program at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago and in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Department at Northwestern University (2003-2012). Additionally, Joe was a research health scientist for the Rehabilitation R&D Service in the Department of Veterans Affairs (Hines, IL) during that time and later a scientist in the neuromuscular biomechanics lab in the Mechanical Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2012-2014). At the time, Joe led projects that addressed the broad question of how to restore hand function (ability to grasp objects) following cervical spinal cord injury and hemiparetic stroke using experimental and computational techniques in biomechanics. As a complement to teaching within the undergraduate and graduate curricula in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (2014-2018), and now teaching broadly within the undergraduate curricula of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering at Stanford, Joe's current scholarship interest has shifted to engineering education.

  • George Toye

    George Toye

    Adjunct Professor

    BioGeorge Toye, Ph.D., P.E., is adjunct professor in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University.

    While teaching advanced project-based engineering design thinking and STEM-based innovations at the graduate level as part of ME310, he also contributes to research in varied topics in engineering education, and effective globally-distributed team collaborations. As well, he remains active in entrepreneurship and varied advising/consulting work.

    George earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from U.C. Berkeley, and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering with minor in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University.

    Since 1983, he has enjoyed volunteering annually to organize regional and state-level Mathcounts competitions to promote mathematics education amongst middle-school aged students.

  • Caroline Trippel

    Caroline Trippel

    Acting Assistant Professor, Computer Science

    BioCaroline Trippel is an Assistant Professor (starting September 2020) in the Computer Science Department at Stanford University working in the area of computer architecture. Her work focuses on promoting correctness and security as first-order computer systems design metrics (akin to performance and power). A central theme of her work is leveraging formal methods techniques to design and verify hardware systems in order to ensure that they can provide correctness and security guarantees for the applications they intend to support.

    Trippel's research has influenced the design of the RISC-V ISA memory consistency model both via her formal analysis of its draft specification and her subsequent participation in the RISC-V Memory Model Task Group. Additionally, her work produced a novel methodology and tool that synthesized two new variants of the now-famous Meltdown and Spectre attacks.

    Trippel's research has been recognized with IEEE Top Picks distinctions. She was also awarded an NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship (2017-2018) and selected to attend the 2018 MIT Rising Stars in EECS Workshop. Trippel completed her PhD in Computer Science at Princeton University and her BS in Computer Engineering at Purdue University.

  • Nick Troccoli

    Nick Troccoli

    Lecturer

    BioNick Troccoli is a Lecturer in the Stanford Computer Science Department. He started as a full-time lecturer at Stanford in Fall 2018, after graduating from Stanford in June 2018 with Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Computer Science. During his undergraduate career, he specialized in Systems, and during his graduate career he specialized in Artificial Intelligence. He was heavily involved in teaching as both an undergraduate and graduate student; he was an undergraduate Section Leader in the CS 198 Section Leading Program, a graduate CA (Course Assistant) for CS 181, the Head TA for CS 106A and CS 106B, and the summer 2017 instructor for CS 106A. In 2017 he was awarded the Forsythe Teaching Award and the Centennial TA Award for excellence in teaching.

  • Stephen Tsai

    Stephen Tsai

    Professor (Research) of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Tsai's research interest is in the development of design methodology of composite materials and structures. As an emerging technology, composite materials offer unique performances for structures that combine light weight with durability. Keys to the successful utilization of composite materials are predictability in performance and cost effective design of anisotropic, laminated structures. Current emphasis is placed on the understanding of failure modes, and computer simulation for design and cost estimation.

  • Edison Tse

    Edison Tse

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Tse received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of Asia Center of Management Science and Engineering, which has the charter of developing executive training programs for executives in Asian enterprises, conducting research on development of the emerging economy in Asia and establishing research affiliations with Asian enterprises, with a special focus in Greater China: China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
    In 1973, he received the prestigious Donald Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in recognition of his outstanding contribution in the field of Automatic Control. He had served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Control, and a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, which he co-founded. In recent years he dedicated his research effort in dynamic entrepreneurial strategy and transformation of Chinese production economy to innovation economy. He developed a significant theory on innovation synergistic to Chinese culture and its application to China industry transformation. Over the years he has made valuable contributions in the field of engineering, economics, and business creation and expansion. He has published over 180 papers on his research activities. Since March 2003, he has been teaching his new found theory on China innovation and Industry Transformation to high level Chinese government officials and Chinese executives.
    Since 2007, he co-directed a Stanford Financial Engineering Certificate Program in Hong Kong that upgrades the quality of managers and traders in the financial institutions in Hong Kong. Since 2009, he co-directed a Stanford program on Regional Industry Transformation and Public Administration that was attended by city officials from various cities in China, and directs a Stanford program on Chinese Industry Transformation and Innovation that was attended by executives from Chinese enterprises. Prof. Tse is the author of over 150 articles in the fields of systems and control. He received the 1973 Donald P. Eckman Award for outstanding achievement in the field of automatic control. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he worked at Systems Control, Inc., where he formulated and solved numerous problems in defense, electric power, forecasting and marketing.
    At Stanford, he has developed computer integrated systems to support fishery management policy decisions, management and control of the manufacturing enterprise, and industrial competitive analysis and product development. He is currently conducting research on building core competence within an enterprise to gain competitive advantage. He established the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and is now a member of its Advisory Board. His national society memberships include the Econometric Society, IEEE, ORSA, and TIMS. Tse developed a framework for analyzing dynamic competitive strategy based on a dynamic model of grabber-holder dynamics that describes the forces that would shape the formation of an ecosystem supporting an exciting vision. Within such a framework, he developed dynamic strategies for firms entering an emerging market, latecomers that want to wedge into a matured market, and firms that need to turn danger into opportunities. Tse’s recent interests are in extending the theory to analyzing the dynamic competition in network economy, regional technology center development, and applying the theory of dynamic strategies to the wireless, airport, real estate, and financial industries in China.

  • Johan Ugander

    Johan Ugander

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioUgander's research develops algorithmic and statistical frameworks for analyzing social networks, social systems, and other large-scale data-rich contexts. He is particularly interested in the challenges of causal inference and experimentation in these complex domains. His work commonly falls at the intersections of graph theory, statistics, optimization, and algorithm design.

  • Jeffrey Ullman

    Jeffrey Ullman

    Stanford Warren Ascherman Professor of Engineering , Emeritus

    BioJeff Ullman is the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Engineering
    (Emeritus) in the Department of Computer Science at Stanford and CEO
    of Gradiance Corp. He received the B.S. degree from Columbia
    University in 1963 and the PhD from Princeton in 1966. Prior to his
    appointment at Stanford in 1979, he was a member of the technical
    staff of Bell Laboratories from
    1966-1969, and on the faculty of Princeton University between
    1969 and 1979. From 1990-1994, he was chair of the Stanford Computer
    Science Department. Ullman was elected to the National Academy of
    Engineering in 1989, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in
    2012, and has held Guggenheim and Einstein Fellowships. He has
    received the Sigmod Contributions Award (1996), the ACM Karl V. Karlstrom
    Outstanding Educator Award (1998), the Knuth Prize (2000),
    the Sigmod E. F. Codd Innovations award (2006), the IEEE von
    Neumann medal (2010), and the NEC C&C Foundation Prize (2017).
    He is the author of 16 books, including books
    on database systems, compilers, automata theory, and algorithms.

  • Javier Urzay Lobo

    Javier Urzay Lobo

    Sr. Research Engineer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI work on theory and computations in fluid mechanics, combustion, chemical-propulsion systems (rocket engines, scramjets, and gas-turbine engines) aerodynamics (supersonics and hypersonics), multi-phase turbulent flows (particle-laden flows, two-phase flows, and fuel sprays), and their applications to aeronautics, astronautics, and energy conversion.

  • Jeremy Utley

    Jeremy Utley

    Adjunct Professor

    BioJeremy currently leads the d.school's work with organizations as Director of Executive Education. In this role, he advises professionals and organizations on how to imbed the tools of design thinking and cultivate an innovative organizational culture. He also teaches the celebrated d.leadership and LaunchPad classes, advanced d.school courses focused on creating real-world impact with the tools of design.

    Jeremy never expected to be a designer. On his 10th birthday, his father asked him what he wanted to be when he grew up. Jeremy replied,”I want to be one of the people who carry boxes with handles.” A little over a decade later, Jeremy became a briefcase-carrying management consultant focusing on economic development. Then, in 2008, the d.school derailed him completely. His time as a student and a fellow at the d.school showed him that “how” he worked was more important than “what” he did. Today, Jeremy is dedicated to helping others along the same path to becoming a designer. He helps people change their deeply-engrained behaviors and discover, as he did, that it is possible for them to make a difference. He does this through teaching as well as through growing alongside his students to become better in his own life and work every day.

    Jeremy is the Director of Executive Education at the d.school. He is a graduate of The University of Texas at Austin’s Red McComb’s School of Business (2005) and the Stanford University Graduate School of Business (2009).

  • Camille Utterback

    Camille Utterback

    Assistant Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioCamille Utterback is an internationally acclaimed artist whose interactive installations and reactive sculptures engage participants in a dynamic process of kinesthetic discovery and play. Utterback’s work explores the aesthetic and experiential possibilities of linking computational systems to human movement and gesture in layered and often humorous ways. Her work focuses attention on the continued relevance and richness of the body in our increasingly mediated world.

    Her work has been exhibited at galleries, festivals, and museums internationally, including The Frist Center for Visual Arts, Nashville, TN; The Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; ZERO1 The Art & Technology Network, San Jose, CA; The New Museum of Contemporary Art, The American Museum of the Moving Image, New York; The NTT InterCommunication Center, Tokyo; The Seoul Metropolitan Museum of Art; The Netherlands Institute for Media Art; The Taipei Museum of Contemporary Art; The Center for Contemporary Art, Kiev, Ukraine; and the Ars Electronica Center, Austria. Utterback’s work is in private and public collections including Hewlett Packard, Itaú Cultural Institute in São Paolo, Brazil, and La Caixa Foundation in Barcelona, Spain.

    Awards and honors include a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2009), a Transmediale International Media Art Festival Award (2005), a Rockefeller Foundation New Media Fellowship (2002) and a commission from the Whitney Museum for the CODeDOC project on their ArtPort website (2002). Utterback holds a US patent for a video tracking system she developed while working as a research fellow at New York University (2004). Her work has been featured in The New York Times (2010, 2009, 2003, 2002, 2001), Art in America (October, 2004), Wired Magazine (February 2004), ARTnews (2001) and many other publications. It is also included in Thames & Hudson’s World of Art – Digital Art book (2003) by Christiane Paul.

    Recent public commissions include works for the Liberty Mutual Group, the FOR-SITE Foundation, The Sacramento Airport, The City of San Jose, California, The City of Fontana, California, and the City of St. Louis Park, Minnesota. Other commissions include projects for The American Museum of Natural History in New York, The Pittsburgh Children’s Museum, The Manhattan Children’s Museum, Herman Miller, Shiseido Cosmetics, and other private corporations.

    Utterback is currently an Assistant Professor in the Art and Art History Department at Stanford University. She holds a BA in Art from Williams College, and a Masters degree from The Interactive Telecommunications Program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts. She currently lives and works in San Francisco.

  • Melissa Valentine

    Melissa Valentine

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMelissa Valentine is an Assistant Professor at Stanford University in the Management Science and Engineering Department, and co-director of the Center for Work, Technology, and Organization (WTO).

    Prof Valentine's research focuses on understanding how new technologies change work and organizations. She conducts in-depth observational studies to develop new understanding about new forms of organizing. Her work makes contributions to understanding classic and longstanding challenges in designing groups and organizations (e.g., the role of hierarchy, how to implement change, team stability vs. flexibility) but also brings in deep knowledge of how the rise of information technology has made possible new and different team and organizational forms. Her most recent study examined how the deployment of new algorithms changed the organizational structure of a retail tech company.

    Prof. Valentine has won awards for both research and teaching. She and collaborators won a Best Paper Award at the CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems and the Outstanding Paper with Practical Implications award from the Organizational Behavior division of the Academy of Management. In 2013, she won the Organization Science/INFORMS dissertation proposal competition and received her PhD from Harvard University.

  • Gregory Valiant

    Gregory Valiant

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary research interests lie at the intersection of algorithms, learning, applied probability, and statistics. I am particularly interested in understanding the algorithmic and information theoretic possibilities and limitations for many fundamental information extraction tasks that underly real-world machine learning and data-centric applications.

  • Benjamin Van Roy

    Benjamin Van Roy

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, of Management Science and Engineering

    BioBenjamin Van Roy is a Professor at Stanford University, where he has served on the faculty since 1998. His research focuses on understanding how an agent interacting with a poorly understood environment can learn over time to make effective decisions. He is interested in the design of efficient reinforcement learning algorithms, understanding what is possible or impossible in this domain, and applying the technology toward the benefit of society. Beyond academia, he leads a DeepMind Research team in Mountain View, and has also led research programs at Unica (acquired by IBM), Enuvis (acquired by SiRF), and Morgan Stanley.

    He is a Fellow of INFORMS and IEEE and has served on the editorial boards of Machine Learning, Mathematics of Operations Research, for which he co-edits the Learning Theory Area, Operations Research, for which he edited the Financial Engineering Area, and the INFORMS Journal on Optimization.

    He received the SB in Computer Science and Engineering and the SM and PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, all from MIT. He has been a recipient of the MIT George C. Newton Undergraduate Laboratory Project Award, the MIT Morris J. Levin Memorial Master's Thesis Award, the MIT George M. Sprowls Doctoral Dissertation Award, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Stanford Tau Beta Pi Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, and the Management Science and Engineering Department's Graduate Teaching Award. He has held visiting positions as the Wolfgang and Helga Gaul Visiting Professor at the University of Karlsruhe, the Chin Sophonpanich Foundation Professor and the InTouch Professor at Chulalongkorn University, a Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore, and a Visiting Professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen.

  • Ross Daniel Venook

    Ross Daniel Venook

    Lecturer, Bioengineering

    BioRoss is a Lecturer in the Bioengineering department and he directs Engineering at the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign.

    Ross co-leads two undergraduate courses at Stanford—an instrumentation lab (BIOE123) and an open-ended capstone design lab sequence (BIOE141A/B)—and he supports other courses and runs hands-on workshops in the areas of prototyping and systems engineering related to medical device innovation. He enjoys the unique challenges and constraints offered by biomedical engineering projects, and he delights in the opportunity for collaborative learning in a problem-solving environment.

    An Electrical Engineer by training (Stanford BS, MS, PhD), Ross’ graduate work focused on building and applying new types of MRI hardware for interventional and device-related uses. Following a Biodesign Innovation fellowship, Ross helped to start the MRI safety program at Boston Scientific Neuromodulation, where he continues working across the MRI safety community to create and improve international standards and to enable safe MRI access for patients with implanted medical devices.

  • Jelena Vuckovic

    Jelena Vuckovic

    Jensen Huang Professor of Global Leadership and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsphotonics, quantum technologies, quantum optics, inverse design

  • Ken Waldron

    Ken Waldron

    Professor (Research) of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

    BioKenneth J. Waldron is Professor of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering at UTS. He is also Professor Emeritus from the Design Group in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Stanford University. He holds bachelors and masters degrees from the University of Sydney, and PhD from Stanford. He works in machine design, and design methodology with a particular focus on robotic and mechatronic systems.

  • Todd Walter

    Todd Walter

    Professor (Research) of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh integrity satellite navigation for guiding aircraft, including satellite based augmentation systems (SBAS) and advanced receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (ARAIM).

  • Brian A. Wandell

    Brian A. Wandell

    Isaac and Madeline Stein Family Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering, of Ophthalmology and at the Graduate School of Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModels and measures of the human visual system. The brain pathways essential for reading development. Diffusion tensor imaging, functional magnetic resonance imaging and computational modeling of visual perception and brain processes.

  • Adam Wang

    Adam Wang

    Assistant Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioMy group develops technologies for advanced x-ray and CT imaging, including novel system design, model-based image reconstruction, spectral imaging, and radiation transport methods. I am also the Director of the Zeego Lab and the Tabletop X-Ray Lab.

    I completed my PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford under the supervision of Dr. Norbert Pelc, developing strategies for maximizing the information content of dual energy CT and photon counting detectors. I then pursued a postdoc at Johns Hopkins with Dr. Jeff Siewerdsen in Biomedical Engineering, developing reconstruction and registration methods for x-ray based image-guided surgery. Prior to returning to Stanford in 2018, I was a Senior Scientist at Varian Medical Systems, developing x-ray/CT methods for image-guided radiation therapy.

  • Bo Wang

    Bo Wang

    Assistant Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Developmental Biology

    BioWe are a discovery-driven research group working at the interface between developmental biology, bioengineering, and statistical physics. We combine quantitative organism-wide fluorescence imaging ("deep imaging"), functional genomics ("deep sequencing"), and physical modeling to understand the fundamental rules that control collective cell behaviors to optimize tissue regeneration, adaptation, and evolution. We also seek for opportunities for applying these rules to improve multicellular engineering systems.

  • Ge Wang

    Ge Wang

    Associate Professor of Music and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGe Wang is an Associate Professor at Stanford University in the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). He specializes in the art of design and computer music — researching programming languages and interactive software design for music, interaction design, mobile music, laptop orchestras, expressive design of virtual reality, aesthetics of music technology design, and education at the intersection of computer science and music. Ge is the author of the ChucK music programming language, the founding director of the Stanford Laptop Orchestra (SLOrk). Ge is also the Co-founder of Smule (reaching over 200 million users), and the designer of the iPhone's Ocarina and Magic Piano. Ge is a 2016 Guggenheim Fellow, and the author of ARTFUL DESIGN: TECHNOLOGY IN SEARCH OF THE SUBLIME—a book on design and technology, art and life‚ published by Stanford University Press in 2018 (see https://artful.design/)

  • Hai Wang

    Hai Wang

    Professor of Mechanical Engineering

    BioHai Wang is Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. His interests are in renewable energy conversion, catalysis and combustion. His current research focuses on theories and applications of nanoparticles and nanostructures for rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, combustion simulations and nanocatalysis. He is the author and coauthor of numerous papers in scholarly journals, including "Mesoporous titania films prepared by flame stabilized on a rotating surface-Application in dye sensitized solar cells" in Journal of Physical Chemistry C, “A detailed kinetic modeling study of aromatics formation in laminar premixed acetylene and ethylene flames” in Combustion and Flame, “Drag force, diffusion coefficient, and electric mobility of small particles. I. Theory applicable to the free-molecule regime” in Physical Review E, “A new mechanism for the formation of meteoritic kerogen-like material” in Science, “Gas-nanoparticle scattering: A molecular view of momentum accommodation function” in Physical Review Letters, and “Formation of nascent soot and other condensed-phase materials in flames” in Proceedings of the Combustion Institute. He is currently the Editor-in-Chief of Progress in Energy and Combustion Science, a highly influential energy journal published by Elsevier with an impact factor of 25.2 (2017).

  • Paul  J. Wang, MD

    Paul J. Wang, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang's research centers on the development of innovative approaches to the treatment of arrhythmias, including more effective catheter ablation techniques, more reliable implantable devices, and less invasive treatments. Dr. Wang's clinical research interests include atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, syncope, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Dr. Wang has active collaborations with Bioengineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering Departments at Stanford.

  • Shan X. Wang

    Shan X. Wang

    Leland T. Edwards Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Wang is the Director of Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology, and the Co-PI of the Stanford Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. His research interests lie in nanotechnology and information storage, including magnetic/spintronic biochips, in vitro diagnostics, cell sorting, magnetic nanoparticles, nano-patterning, spin electronic materials and sensors, as well as magnetic integrated inductors and transformers.

  • Robert Waymouth

    Robert Waymouth

    Robert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    BioRobert Eckles Swain Professor in Chemistry Robert Waymouth investigates new catalytic strategies to create useful new molecules, including sustainable polymers, synthetic fuels, and bioactive molecules. In one such breakthrough, Professor Waymouth and IBM researcher Jim Hedrick opened a new path for production of environmentally sustainable plastics and improved plastics recycling, earning recognition in the 2012 Presidential Green Chemistry Award.

    Born in 1960 in Warner Robins, Georgia, Robert Waymouth studied chemistry and mathematics at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia (B.S. and B.A., respectively, both summa cum laude, 1982). He developed an interest in synthetic and mechanistic organometallic chemistry during his doctoral studies in chemistry at the California Institute of Technology under Professor R.H. Grubbs (Ph.D., 1987). His postdoctoral research with Professor Piero Pino at the Institut fur Polymere, ETH Zurich, Switzerland, focused on catalytic hydrogenation with chiral metallocene catalysts. He joined the Stanford University faculty as assistant professor in 1988, becoming full professor in 1997 and in 2000 the Robert Eckles Swain Professor of Chemistry.

    Today, the Waymouth Group applies mechanistic principles to develop new concepts in catalysis, with particular focus on the development of organometallic and organic catalysts for the synthesis of complex macromolecular architectures. In organometallic catalysis, the group devised a highly selective alcohol oxidation catalyst that selectively oxidizes unprotected polyols and carbohydrates to alpha-hyroxyketones. The Waymouth group pioneered the development of catalysts that can access multiple kinetic states during a polymerization reaction in order to control sequence distribution. They devised a novel strategy for the synthesis of elastomeric polypropylene utilizing a metallocene catalyst whose structure was designed to interconvert between chiral and achiral coordination geometries on the timescale of the synthesis of a single polymer chain.

    In collaboration with Jim Hedrick of IBM laboratories, the Waymouth Group has developed an extensive platform of organic catalysts for the controlled ring-opening polymerization of lactones, carbonates and other heterocyclic monomers. Mechanistic studies of nucleophilic N-heterocyclic carbene catalysts revealed an unusual zwitterionic ring-opening polymerization method which enabled the synthesis of high molecular weight cyclic polymers, a novel topology for these biodegradable and biocompatible macromolecules. In collaboration with the Wender group, the Waymouth group has devised selective organocatalytic strategies for the synthesis of functional degradable polymers and oligomers that function as "molecular transporters" to deliver drugs and probes into cells. These efforts combine elements of mechanistic organic and organometallic chemistry, polymer synthesis, and homogeneous catalysis to rationally design new macromolecular structures.

  • Steve Weinstein

    Steve Weinstein

    Lecturer

    BioWith a background that spans technology, product development, and entertainment, Steve Weinstein has been focused on where media meets technology. Currently Steve is the founder and CEO of MovieLabs. Steve is also the co-founder of KineTrope a small design shop for small consumer and professional electronics. Additionally, Steve is currently teaching entrepreneurship at U.C. Berkeley and at Stanford.

    Previously, Steve served as CTO of Deluxe Entertainment, a 6,000 person post production house, and CTO at Rovi Corporation where he guided the transition from physical technologies to e-commerce, connected home, secure and subscription services. Additionally, Steve held the role of Chief Technology Officer at Vicinity, a mapping company acquired by Microsoft in 2002. Steve was also a founding executive and Chief Strategist and Technologist at Liberate Technologies, an interactive television software company. Further back in his career, Steve held executive-level positions at Microprose/Spectrum HoloByte (game company), Electronics for Imaging (print processing), and Media Cybernetics (image processing). Steve also was chief architect at Ship Analytics for real time ship, sub and helicopter trainers. Steve started his career at Naval Research Laboratory in the area of advanced signal processing, computer language design, and real time os development.

  • Itschak Weissman

    Itschak Weissman

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioTsachy's research focuses on Information Theory, Data Compression and Communications, Statistical Signal Processing, Machine Learning, the interplay between them, and their applications, with recent focus on applications to genomic data compression and processing. He is inventor of several patents and involved in several companies as member of the technical board. IEEE fellow, he serves on the board of governors of the information theory society as well as the editorial boards of the Transactions on Information Theory and Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory. He is founding Director of the Stanford Compression Forum.

  • Gordon Wetzstein

    Gordon Wetzstein

    Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioGordon Wetzstein is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science at Stanford University. He is the leader of the Stanford Computational Imaging Lab and a faculty co-director of the Stanford Center for Image Systems Engineering. At the intersection of computer graphics, machine vision, optics, scientific computing, and applied vision science, Prof. Wetzstein's research has a wide range of applications in next-generation imaging, display, wearable computing, and microscopy systems. Prior to joining Stanford in 2014, Prof. Wetzstein was a Research Scientist in the Camera Culture Group at MIT. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of British Columbia in 2011 and graduated with Honors from the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany before that. He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, an ACM SIGGRAPH Significant New Researcher Award, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), a Terman Fellowship, an Okawa Research Grant, the Electronic Imaging Scientist of the Year 2017 Award, an Alain Fournier Ph.D. Dissertation Award, and a Laval Virtual Award as well as Best Paper and Demo Awards at ICCP 2011, 2014, and 2016 and at ICIP 2016.

  • John Weyant

    John Weyant

    Professor (Research) of Management Science and Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    BioJohn P. Weyant is Professor of Management Science and Engineering, Director of the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) and Deputy Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy and an an affiliated faculty member of the Stanford School of Earth, Environment and Energy Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford. His current research focuses on analysis of multi-sector, multi-region coupled human and earth sytsems dynamics, global change systems analysis, energy technology assessment, and models for strategic planning.

    Weyant was a founder and serves as chairman of the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium (IAMC), a thirteen year old collaboratory with over 60 member institutions from around the world. He has been an active adviser to the United Nations, the European Commission, U.S.Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of State, aod the Environmental Protection Agency. In California, he has been and adviser to the California Air Resources, the California Energy Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission..

    Weyant was awarded the US Association for Energy Economics’ 2008 Adelmann-Frankel award for unique and innovative contributions to the field of energy economics and the award for outstanding lifetime contributions to the Profession for 2017 from the International Association for Energy Economics, and a Life Time Achievement award from the Integrated Assessment Modeling Consortium in 2018. Weyant was honored in 2007 as a major contributor to the Nobel Peace prize awarded to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and in 2008 by Chairman Mary Nichols for contributions to the to the California Air Resources Board's Economic and Technology Advancement Advisory Committee on AB 32.

    Fields of Specialization:
    Energy/Environmental Policy Analysis, Strategic Planning

    Interests:
    Overall goal is to accelerate the use of systems models at state, country, and global scales, aiming to provide the best available information and insights to government and private-sector decision makers. Specific areas include energy, climate change, and sustainable development policy, including emerging technologies and market design alternatives. Draws on concepts and techniques from science and engineering fundamentals (e.g., thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, materials science, and electrical power systems), operations research, economics, finance, and decision theory.

  • Jennifer Widom

    Jennifer Widom

    Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering, Fletcher Jones Professor in Computer Science and Professor of Electrical Engineering

    BioJennifer Widom is the Frederick Emmons Terman Dean of the School of Engineering and the Fletcher Jones Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. She served as Computer Science Department Chair from 2009-2014 and School of Engineering Senior Associate Dean from 2014-2016. Jennifer received her Bachelor's degree from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in 1982 and her Computer Science Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1987. She was a Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center before joining the Stanford faculty in 1993. Her research interests span many aspects of nontraditional data management. She is an ACM Fellow and a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences; she received a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2000, the ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award in 2007, the ACM-W Athena Lecturer Award in 2015, and the EPFL-WISH Foundation Erna Hamburger Prize in 2018.

  • Bernard Widrow

    Bernard Widrow

    Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProf. Widrow's research focuses on adaptive signal processing, adaptive control systems, adaptive neural networks, human memory, and human-like memory for computers. Applications include signal processing, prediction, noise cancelling, adaptive arrays, control systems, and pattern recognition. Recent work is about human learning at the synaptic level.

  • Terry Winograd

    Terry Winograd

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Winograd's focus is on human-computer interaction design and the design of technologies for development. He directs the teaching programs and HCI research in the Stanford Human-Computer Interaction Group, which recently celebrated it's 20th anniversary. He is also a founding faculty member of the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (the "d.school") and on the faculty of the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law (CDDRL)

    Winograd was a founding member and past president of Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility. He is on a number of journal editorial boards, including Human Computer Interaction, ACM Transactions on Computer Human Interaction, and Informatica. He has advised a number of companies started by his students, including Google. In 2011 he received the ACM SIGCHI Lifetime Research Award.

  • Keith Winstein

    Keith Winstein

    Assistant Professor of Computer Science and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioKeith Winstein's homepage is at https://cs.stanford.edu/~keithw

  • H.-S. Philip Wong

    H.-S. Philip Wong

    Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioWong joined Stanford in 2004 after 16 years at IBM Research, with appointments as research staff member, Manager, and Senior Manager. While at IBM, he was responsible for shaping and executing IBM's strategy on nanoscale science and technology and silicon technology. His interests are in the area of nanoscale science and technology, semiconductor technology, solid-state devices, and electronic imaging.

    His present research covers a broad range of topics including carbon electronics, 2D layered materials, wireless implantable biosensors, directed self-assembly, nanoelectromechanical relays, device modeling, brain-inspired computing, and non-volatile memory devices such as phase change memory and metal oxide resistance change memory.

  • S Simon Wong

    S Simon Wong

    Professor of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent research focuses on

    Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) and Integration with CMOS

    Energy Efficient Approximate Computing for Machine Learning

  • Wing Hung Wong

    Wing Hung Wong

    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health and Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interest centers on the application of statistics to biology and medicine. We are particularly interested in questions concerning gene regulation, genome interpretation and their applications to precision medicine.

  • Choi Yue Victoria Woo

    Choi Yue Victoria Woo

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWoo, V. (2018). With or Without You, How Family Support Can Make or Break A Business, or worse, an Entrepreneur. Paper presented at AOM Start-Up to Scale-Up Conference, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
    Woo, V. (2017). Thrive Transitional Experiences- Self-knowledge Improvisation and Transformation Quotient in a highly dynamic world. Chapter 4; Human Capital and Assets in the Networked World; ISBN: 978-1-78714-828-4
    Woo, V. (2016). Relation of Self-Knowledge and Improvisation to Thriving Transitional Experiences. Paper presented at the 18th IAMB Conference, Regent University, London, United Kingdom.
    Woo, V. (2015). Thriving In Transition: Cognitive, Social and Behavioral Resources For Times Of Change (Doctoral Dissertation).
    Woo, V. (2014) User Benefit and Adoption of Web-based Counseling Tool: Designing An Artifact using Action Research Design Methods Special Sessions Presentation at Academy of Marketing Sciences Conference, Indianapolis, Indiana
    Woo, V., Boland, R. J., Fry, R., & Lyytinen, K. (2014). Thriving in Transition Through The Lens Of Transformation Quotient: Navigational Competence Of Mobile Executives In Changing Times. Paper presented at the 18th IAMB Conference, Roma Tre University, Rome, Italy.
    Woo, V., & Boland, R. J. (2013). Significant Life Changes and Changing Lives: Discovering Lived Lives of International Mobile Professionals. Paper presented at the Third Annual International Conference on Engaged Management Scholarship, Atlanta, Georgia.