School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 21 Results

  • Thomas Bartlett

    Thomas Bartlett

    Lecturer

    BioThomas Bartlett has taught classical and modern Chinese at Yale (1975), Cambridge (1975-6), Princeton (1977-9), Harvard (1987-94), Johns Hopkins (1995-6), and La Trobe (1996-9) Universities, and at Middlebury (1973, 1983, 1987), Wellesley (1986), and Swarthmore (1987) Colleges, before starting to teach at Stanford in 2011.

    Bartlett's BA cum laude (Harvard, Classics 1961) was in Greek literature; his honors thesis on Aeschylus' drama "Agamemnon," read in Greek, was titled "The Law of Zeus: Learning by Suffering. O Δios νομοσ: πα8ει μα8οσ." His MA (National Taiwan, History 1972) was in ancient Chinese History, with a thesis on Confucian historiography titled "Analysis of the Historian's Commentary on Ritual Propriety in Zuo Chronicle" 左傳中有關禮的史料之分析. His PhD (Princeton, East Asian Studies 1972) was in premodern Chinese history, with a dissertation on Confucian statecraft titled "Gu Yanwu's 顧炎武 (1613-82) Response to 'The Demise of Human Society' 天下亡."

    In 1978 Bartlett was a finalist in the U.S. Department of State's search for a full-time male Mandarin interpreter. In 1980 he worked in Beijing for six months for Turner Construction Co, as interpreter at contract negotiations and as liaison officer with local agencies. In 1987 Bartlett declined a Mellon post-doctoral fellowship at an Ivy League university, when told by the offering institution that affirmative action considerations would render him uncompetitive for the subsequent tenure-track teaching position advertised with the Mellon grant. In spring 1989 his proficiency in modern Chinese was graded 4 (of 5) by the U.S. Foreign Service Institute. From mid-1989 through 1994 he was Professor of Chinese Language and director of Harvard's Chinese Language Program. During 1995-6 he was Director of the Language Teaching Center at Johns Hopkins. During 1996-2007 he was Senior Lecturer at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia, where he occasionally accompanied Australian academic delegations to China as Mandarin interpreter and during each year of 2001-2006 taught a full-year survey course in Chinese history. Since AY 2011-12, he has repeatedly taught courses in the Classical Chinese curriculum at Stanford, emphasizing selected readings in early philosophical and historical texts. In autumn 2014 he was Visiting Professor in the Graduate Institute of History at National Tsing Hua University in Hsin-chu, Taiwan, Republic of China.

    Bartlett's abiding intellectual interests include: 1) conceptual issues relating to the term "Zhongguo" 中國, literally "Central State/s" and often rendered simply as "China" in recent times; 2) issues relating to belief in the authenticity of the classical canon.

    Bartlett's review of Ian Johnston's recent translations from Gu Yanwu's writings appeared in the journal Dao (2018) 17:611-15. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11712-018-9634-6.

  • Steven Carter

    Steven Carter

    Yamato Ichihashi Chair in Japanese History and Civilization, Emeritus

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Japanese Poetry, Poetics, and Poetic Culture
    - The Japanese Essay (zuihitsu)
    - Travel Writing
    - Historical Fiction
    - The Relationship between the Social and the Aesthetic

  • Richard Dasher

    Richard Dasher

    Adjunct Professor

    BioRichard Dasher has been Director of the US-Asia Technology Management Center at Stanford University since 1994. He served concurrently as the Executive Director of the Center for Integrated Systems in Stanford's School of Engineering from 1998 - 2015. His research and teaching focus on the flow of people, knowledge, and capital in innovation systems, on the impact of new technologies on industry value chains, and on open innovation management. Dr. Dasher serves on the advisory boards for national universities and research institutions in Japan and Thailand. He is on the selection and review committees of major government funding programs for science, technology, and innovation and in Canada and Japan. He is an advisor to start-up companies, business accelerators, venture capital firms, and nonprofits in Silicon Valley, China, Japan, and S. Korea. Dr. Dasher was the first non-Japanese person ever asked to join the governance of a Japanese national university, serving as a Board Director and member of the Management Council of Tohoku University from 2004 - 2010. Dr. Dasher received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Linguistics from Stanford University. From 1986 – 90, he was Director of the U.S. State Department’s Advanced Language and Area Training Centers in Japan and Korea that provide full-time curricula to U.S. and Commonwealth Country diplomats assigned to those countries.

  • Ronald Egan

    Ronald Egan

    Confucius Institute Professor of Sinology

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Chinese Poetry
    - Song dynasty Poetry and literati Culture
    - The social and historical context of Song dynasty aesthetics

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Indra Levy

    Indra Levy

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioIndra Levy received her Ph.D. in modern Japanese literature from Columbia University in 2001. She is the author of Sirens of the Western Shore: the Westernesque Femme Fatale, Translation, and Vernacular Style in Modern Japanese Literature (Columbia, 2006) and editor of Translation in Modern Japan (Routledge, 2009). Her current work focuses on humor in Japanese literature, performance, and translation from the late 19th century to the mid-20th. Research interests include modern Japanese literature and criticism; critical translation studies; gender and language; modern Japanese performance, especially in the Meiji and Taishō eras; and modern Japanese women’s intellectual history..

  • Li Liu

    Li Liu

    Sir Robert Ho Tung Professor in Chinese Archeology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests:
    Archaeology of early China (Neolithic and Bronze Age); ritual practice in ancient China; cultural interaction between China and other parts of the Old World; early domestication of plants and animals in China; theory of development of complex societies and state formation; settlement archaeology; urbanism; zooarchaeology; starch analysis; use-wear analysis; mortuary analysis; craft specialization