School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 19 Results

  • Steven Carter

    Steven Carter

    Yamato Ichihashi Chair in Japanese History and Civilization, Emeritus

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Japanese Poetry, Poetics, and Poetic Culture
    - The Japanese Essay (zuihitsu)
    - Travel Writing
    - Historical Fiction
    - The Relationship between the Social and the Aesthetic

  • Richard Dasher

    Richard Dasher

    Adjunct Professor

    BioRichard Dasher has been Director of the US-Asia Technology Management Center at Stanford University since 1994. He served concurrently as the Executive Director of the Center for Integrated Systems in Stanford's School of Engineering from 1998 - 2015. His research and teaching focus on the flow of people, knowledge, and capital in innovation systems, on the impact of new technologies on industry value chains, and on open innovation management. Dr. Dasher serves on the advisory boards for national universities and research institutions in Japan and Thailand. He is on the selection and review committees of major government funding programs for science, technology, and innovation and in Canada and Japan. He is an advisor to start-up companies, business accelerators, venture capital firms, and nonprofits in Silicon Valley, China, Japan, and S. Korea. Dr. Dasher was the first non-Japanese person ever asked to join the governance of a Japanese national university, serving as a Board Director and member of the Management Council of Tohoku University from 2004 - 2010. Dr. Dasher received M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Linguistics from Stanford University. From 1986 – 90, he was Director of the U.S. State Department’s Advanced Language and Area Training Centers in Japan and Korea that provide full-time curricula to U.S. and Commonwealth Country diplomats assigned to those countries.

  • Ronald Egan

    Ronald Egan

    Confucius Institute Professor of Sinology

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Chinese Poetry
    - Song dynasty Poetry and literati Culture
    - The social and historical context of Song dynasty aesthetics

  • Haiyan Lee

    Haiyan Lee

    Walter A. Haas Professor of the Humanities and Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern Chinese literature and popular culture; philosophy and literature; law and literature; cognitive science; affect studies; cultural studies of gender, sexuality, race, and religion; human-animal relations and environmental humanities

  • Indra Levy

    Indra Levy

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and of Comparative Literature and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    BioIndra Levy received her Ph.D. in modern Japanese literature from Columbia University in 2001. She is the author of Sirens of the Western Shore: the Westernesque Femme Fatale, Translation, and Vernacular Style in Modern Japanese Literature (Columbia, 2006) and editor of Translation in Modern Japan (Routledge, 2009). Her current work focuses on humor in Japanese literature, performance, and translation from the late 19th century to the mid-20th. Research interests include modern Japanese literature and criticism; critical translation studies; gender and language; modern Japanese performance, especially in the Meiji and Taishō eras; and modern Japanese women’s intellectual history..

  • Li Liu

    Li Liu

    Sir Robert Ho Tung Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests:
    Archaeology of early China (Neolithic and Bronze Age); ritual practice in ancient China; cultural interaction between China and other parts of the Old World; early domestication of plants and animals in China; theory of development of complex societies and state formation; settlement archaeology; urbanism; zooarchaeology; starch analysis; use-wear analysis; mortuary analysis; craft specialization

  • Noriko Manabe

    Noriko Manabe

    Visiting Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures

    BioI am an ethnomusicologist and music theorist whose publications focus on two intersecting areas: 1) music and politics, particularly social movements and war trauma; and 2) popular music in global context, exploring social and aesthetic processes of globalization and identity formation. I am an associate professor of music studies at Temple University and am a visiting associate professor in East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford during AY2021-22.

    My first book, The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Protest Music after Fukushima (Oxford), is an ethnographic study of how musicians express their politics in four arenas: cyberspace, street protests, festivals, and recordings. I consider why Japanese musicians are constrained in political expression; how cyberspace both enables and silences protest; how urban landscapes and soundscapes shape the sound of a demonstration; and the metaphorical approaches that Japanese musicians take in recordings. My second monograph, in progress, considers the pervasiveness of intertextuality in protest music and how the type of intertextuality used changes in accordance with political circumstances. I have also published articles and chapters on the interaction of linguistics with Japanese rock and hip hop; Japanese DJs; music related to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs; Japanese children's songs; Cuban music; and the music industry. Combining ethnography with music theory, I develop frameworks drawn from linguistics, political science, urban studies, literary studies, and financial analysis. I am the editor of 33-1/3 Japan, a book series on Japanese popular music for Bloomsbury, and co-editor (with Eric Drott) of the Oxford Handbook of Protest Music. Links to my work can be found on norikomanabe.academia.edu, norikomanabe.com, or https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6970-4570.