School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 18 Results

  • James Ferguson

    James Ferguson

    Susan S. and William H. Hindle Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsJames's Ferguson's research has focused on southern Africa (especially Lesotho, Zambia, South Africa, and Namibia), and has engaged a broad range of theoretical and ethnographic issues. These include the politics of “development”, rural-urban migration, changing topgraphies of property and wealth, constructions of space and place, urban culture in mining towns, experiences of modernity, the spatialization of states, the place of “Africa” in a real and imagined world, and the theory and politics of ethnography. Running through much of this work is a concern with how discourses organized around concepts such as “development” and “modernity” intersect the lives of ordinary people.

    Professor Ferguson's most recent work has explored the surprising creation and/or expansion (both in southern Africa and across the global South) of social welfare programs targeting the poor, anchored in schemes that directly transfer small amounts of cash to large numbers of low-income people. His work aims to situate these programs within a larger “politics of distribution,” and to show how they are linked to emergent forms of distributive politics in contexts where new masses of “working age” people are supported by means other than wage labor. In such settings of scarce and diminishing employment opportunities, distributive practices and distributive politics are acquiring a new centrality, with social protection, in particular, emerging as a key arena within which fundamental questions are addressed concerning how resources should be distributed, who is entitled to receive them, and why. In this context, new political possibilities and dangers are emerging, even as new analytical and critical strategies are required. A book on this topic (Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution) was recently published by Duke University Press.

  • Anne Fernald

    Anne Fernald

    Josephine Knotts Knowles Professor of Human Biology, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWorking with English- and Spanish-learning children from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds, our research examines the importance of early language experience in supporting language development. We are deeply involved in community-based research in San Jose, designing an innovative parent-engagement program for low-resource Latino families with young children. We are also conducting field studies of beliefs about child development and caregiver-child interaction in rural villages in Senegal. A central goal of this translational research is to help parents understand their vital role in facilitating children’s language and cognitive growth.

  • Daniel Keath Fetter

    Daniel Keath Fetter

    Acting Assistant Professor, Economics

    BioFor the 2019-20 academic year, Dan Fetter will be the Trione Acting Assistant Professor at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR) and Stanford’s Economics Department. Starting 1-July 2020, Dan will be an Assistant Professor of Economics at Stanford. He is a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and serves on the Editorial Board of Explorations in Economic History. Dan’s research is in economic history and applied microeconomics, with a focus on government intervention in housing and mortgage markets as well as the effects of government old age support. Dan received his BA from Wesleyan University in 2000, his MSc from the London School of Economics in 2004, and his PhD from Harvard in 2010.

  • Morris Fiorina

    Morris Fiorina

    Wendt Family Professor and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioMorris P. Fiorina is the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science at Stanford University and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution. He received an undergraduate degree from Allegheny College (1968) and a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester (1972), and taught at the California Institute of Technology and Harvard University before coming to Stanford in 1998. Fiorina has written widely on American government and politics, with special emphasis on topics in the study of representation and elections. He has published numerous articles and written or edited ten books: Representatives, Roll Calls, and Constituencies; Congress--Keystone of the Washington Establishment (two editions); Retrospective Voting in American National Elections; The Personal Vote: Constituency Service and Electoral Independence (coauthored with Bruce Cain and John Ferejohn); Home Style and Washington Work (co-edited with David Rohde); Divided Government (two editions); Cvic Engagement in American Democracy (co-edited with Theda Skocpol), Change and Continuity in House Elections (co-edited with David Brady and John Cogan), Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America (three editions, with Samuel Abrams and Jeremy Pope), and most recently, Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics (with Samuel Abrams). Fiorina has served on the editorial boards of a dozen journals in the fields of Political Science, Political Economy, Law, and Public Policy, and from 1986-1990 served as chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. In 2006 the Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior Section of the American Political Science Association awarded him the Warren E. Miller Prize for career contributions to the field. Most recently he was named the 2009 Harold Lasswell Fellow of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences. At Stanford Fiorina teaches the introductory course in American Politics.

  • James Fishkin

    James Fishkin

    Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    BioJames S. Fishkin holds the Janet M. Peck Chair in International Communication at Stanford University where he is Professor of Communication, Professor of Political Science (by courtesy) and Director of the Center for Deliberative Democracy.

    He received his B.A. from Yale in 1970 and holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale as well as a second Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cambridge.

    He is the author of Democracy When the People Are Thinking (Oxford 2018), When the People Speak (Oxford 2009), Deliberation Day (Yale 2004 with Bruce Ackerman) and Democracy and Deliberation (Yale 1991).

    He is best known for developing Deliberative Polling® – a practice of public consultation that employs random samples of the citizenry to explore how opinions would change if they were more informed. His work on deliberative democracy has stimulated more than 100 Deliberative Polls in 28 countries around the world. It has been used to help governments and policy makers make important decisions in Texas, China, Mongolia, Japan, Macau, South Korea, Bulgaria, Brazil, Uganda and other countries around the world.

    He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and a Visiting Fellow Commoner at Trinity College, Cambridge.