School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-21 of 21 Results

  • Shanhui Fan

    Shanhui Fan

    Director, Edward L. Ginzton Laboratory, Professor of Electrical Engineering, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    BioFan's research involves the theory and simulations of photonic and solid-state materials and devices; photonic crystals; nano-scale photonic devices and plasmonics; quantum optics; computational electromagnetics; parallel scientific computing.

  • Michael Fayer

    Michael Fayer

    David Mulvane Ehrsam and Edward Curtis Franklin Professor in Chemistry

    BioMy research group studies complex molecular systems by using ultrafast multi-dimensional infrared and non-linear UV/Vis methods. A basic theme is to understand the role of mesoscopic structure on the properties of molecular systems. Many systems have structure on length scales large compare to molecules but small compared to macroscopic dimensions. The mesoscopic structures occur on distance scales of a few nanometers to a few tens of nanometers. The properties of systems, such as water in nanoscopic environments, room temperature ionic liquids, functionalized surfaces, liquid crystals, metal organic frameworks, water and other liquids in nanoporous silica, polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes, vesicles, and micelles depend on molecular level dynamics and intermolecular interactions. Our ultrafast measurements provide direct observables for understanding the relationships among dynamics, structure, and intermolecular interactions.

    Bulk properties are frequently a very poor guide to understanding the molecular level details that determine the nature of a chemical process and its dynamics. Because molecules are small, molecular motions are inherently very fast. Recent advances in methodology developed in our labs make it possible for us to observe important processes as they occur. These measurements act like stop-action photography. To focus on a particular aspect of a time evolving system, we employ sequences of ultrashort pulses of light as the basis for non-linear methods such as ultrafast infrared two dimensional vibrational echoes, optical Kerr effect methods, and ultrafast IR transient absorption experiments.

    We are using ultrafast 2D IR vibrational echo spectroscopy and other multi-dimensional IR methods, which we have pioneered, to study dynamics of molecular complexes, water confined on nm lengths scales with a variety of topographies, molecules bound to surfaces, ionic liquids, and materials such as metal organic frameworks and porous silica. We can probe the dynamic structures these systems. The methods are somewhat akin to multidimensional NMR, but they probe molecular structural evolution in real time on the relevant fast time scales, eight to ten orders of magnitude faster than NMR. We are obtaining direct information on how nanoscopic confinement of water changes its properties, a topic of great importance in chemistry, biology, geology, and materials. For the first time, we are observing the motions of molecular bound to surfaces. In biological membranes, we are using the vibrational echo methods to study dynamics and the relationship among dynamics, structure, and function. We are also developing and applying theory to these problems frequently in collaboration with top theoreticians.

    We are studying dynamics in complex liquids, in particular room temperature ionic liquids, liquid crystals, supercooled liquids, as well as in influence of small quantities of water on liquid dynamics. Using ultrafast optical heterodyne detected optical Kerr effect methods, we can follow processes from tens of femtoseconds to ten microseconds. Our ability to look over such a wide range of time scales is unprecedented. The change in molecular dynamics when a system undergoes a phase change is of fundamental and practical importance. We are developing detailed theory as the companion to the experiments.

    We are studying photo-induced proton transfer in nanoscopic water environments such as polyelectrolyte fuel cell membranes, using ultrafast UV/Vis fluorescence and multidimensional IR measurements to understand the proton transfer and other processes and how they are influenced by nanoscopic confinement. We want to understand the role of the solvent and the systems topology on proton transfer dynamics.

  • Benjamin Ezekiel Feldman

    Benjamin Ezekiel Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow do material properties change as a result of interactions among electrons, and what is the nature of the new phases that result? What novel physical phenomena and functionality (e.g., symmetry breaking or topological excitations) can be realized by combining materials and device elements to produce emergent behavior? How can we leverage nontraditional measurement techniques to gain new insight into quantum materials? These are some of the overarching questions we seek to address in our research.

    We are interested in a variety of quantum systems, especially those composed of two-dimensional flakes and heterostructures. This class of materials has been shown to exhibit an incredible variability in their properties, with the further benefit that they are highly tunable through gating and applied fields.

  • Jessica Feldman

    Jessica Feldman

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are interested in understanding design principles within cells that contribute to the diversification of cellular form and function. Using a combination of genetic, biochemical, and live imaging approaches, we are investigating how the microtubule cytoskeleton is spatially organized and the mechanisms underlying organizational changes during development.

  • Marcus Feldman

    Marcus Feldman

    Burnet C. and Mildred Finley Wohlford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHuman genetic and cultural evolution, mathematical biology, demography of China

  • Russell D. Fernald

    Russell D. Fernald

    Benjamin Scott Crocker Professor of Human Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIn the course of evolution,two of the strongest selective forces in nature,light and sex, have left their mark on living organisms. I am interested in how the development and function of the nervous system reflects these events. We use the reproductive system to understand how social behavior influences the main system of reproductive action controlled by a collection of cells in the brain containing gonodotropin releasing hormone(GnRH)

  • Francesco Ferretti

    Francesco Ferretti

    Basic Life Science Research Associate, Biology

    BioI am a quantitative and computational marine ecologist specialized in research synthesis. My scientific work is on marine conservation, fishery sciences, population dynamics, and quantitative ecology with a special interest in sharks and rays. I combine ecology, statistical modeling, and computer science to approach questions on animal abundance and distribution, species interactions, large marine predators, top-down control, structure and functioning of large marine ecosystems.

  • Chris Field

    Chris Field

    Melvin and Joan Lane Professor for Interdisciplinary Environmental Studies, Director, Woods Institute for the Environment, Professor of Earth System Science, of Biology and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch
    My field is climate-change science, and my research emphasizes human-ecological interactions across many disciplines. Most studies include aspects of ecology, but also aspects of law, sociology, medicine, or engineering.

  • Daniel Fisher

    Daniel Fisher

    David Starr Jordan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvolutionary & ecological dynamics & diversity, microbial, expt'l, & cancer

  • Ian Fisher

    Ian Fisher

    Director, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Professor of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Materials Science and Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur research focuses on the study of quantum materials with unconventional magnetic & electronic ground states & phase transitions. Emphasis on design and discovery of new materials. Recent focus on use of strain as a probe of, and tuning parameter for, a variety of electronic states. Interests include unconventional superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, nematicity, multipolar order, instabilities of low-dimensional materials and quantum magnetism.

  • John Fox

    John Fox

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStanford University Research areas center on optimal control methods to improve energy
    efficiency and resource allocation in plug-in hybrid vehicles. Stanford graduate courses
    taught in laboratory techniques and electronic instrumentation. Undergraduate course
    "Energy Choices for the 21st Century"

  • Hunter Fraser

    Hunter Fraser

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the regulation and evolution of gene expression using a combination of experimental and computational approaches.

    Our work brings together quantitative genetics, genomics, epigenetics, and evolutionary biology to achieve a deeper understanding of how genetic variation within and between species affects genome-wide gene expression and ultimately shapes the phenotypic diversity of life.

  • Wolf B. Frommer

    Wolf B. Frommer

    Professor (by Courtesy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWatching cells at work
    Focus: Transport / signaling across the plasma membrane (sugars, amino acids).
    Tools: FRET-based nanosensors for metabolite imaging (with subcellular resolution) in living organisms using confocal fluorescence microscopy and HTS; Sensor optimization by computational design; RNAi to modify cellular functions.
    Goals: Identify unknown sugar effluxers from liver/plant cells; study regulatory networks.
    Model systems: liver, neuronal, plant cell cultures, Arabidopsis, yeast

  • Judith Frydman

    Judith Frydman

    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe long term goal of our research is to understand how proteins fold in living cells. My lab uses a multidisciplinary approach to address fundamental questions about molecular chaperones, protein folding and degradation. In addition to basic mechanistic principles, we aim to define how impairment of cellular folding and quality control are linked to disease, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases and examine whether reengineering chaperone networks can provide therapeutic strategies.

  • Tadashi Fukami

    Tadashi Fukami

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEcological and evolutionary community assembly, with emphasis on understanding historical contingency in community structure, ecosystem functioning, biological invasion and ecological restoration, using experimental, theoretical, and comparative methods involving bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals.