School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 41-50 of 75 Results

  • Erica Gould

    Erica Gould

    Lecturer

    BioErica Gould is the Director of the International Relations Honors Program, a lecturer in International Relations and also a lecturer in International Policy Studies at Stanford University. She has taught courses on honors thesis writing, international political economy and international organizations at Stanford for the past ten years. Previously, Dr. Gould was on the faculty at the University of Virginia, and has also taught courses on international relations at Johns Hopkins University and the Higher School of Economics in Moscow. Dr. Gould’s research has centered mainly around the question of how international organizations are controlled. She is currently working on a project concerning international organizational decision-making rules and also one on the accountability mechanisms associated with international organizations. Her publications include Money Talks: The International Monetary Fund, Conditionality and Supplementary Financiers (Stanford University Press, 2006), as well as numerous articles in academic journals and edited volumes. In addition to her research and teaching, Dr. Gould serves on the Board of Accountability Counsel, an international NGO based in San Francisco. She received her PhD in Political Science from Stanford University and her BA from Cornell University.

  • Lawrence Goulder

    Lawrence Goulder

    Shuzo Nishihara Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLawrence H. Goulder is the Shuzo Nishihara Professor in Environmental and Resource Economics at Stanfordt Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Center for Environmental and Energy Policy Analysis. He is also the Kennedy-Grossman Fellow in Human Biology at Stanford; a Senior Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Economic Policy Research; a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; and a University Fellow of Resources for the Future.

    Goulder graduated from Harvard College with an A.B. in philosophy in 1973. He obtained a master's degree in musical composition from the Ecole Normale de Musique de Paris in 1975 and earned a Ph.D. in economics from Stanford in 1982. He was a faculty member in the Department of Economics at Harvard before returning to Stanford's economics department in 1989.

    Goulder's research covers a range of environmental issues, including green tax reform, the design of cap-and-trade systems, climate change policy, and comprehensive wealth measurement ("green" accounting). He has served as co-editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and on several advisory committees to the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board and the California Air Resources Board.

    His work often employs a general equilibrium analytical framework that integrates the economy and the environment and links the activities of government, industry, and households. The research considers both the aggregate benefits and costs of various policies as well as the distribution of policy impacts across industries, income groups, and generations. Some of his work involves collaborations with climatologists and biologists.

    At Stanford Goulder teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in environmental economics and policy, and co-organizes a weekly seminar in public and environmental economics.

  • William Gow

    William Gow

    Lecturer

    BioWilliam Gow is a San Francisco-based historian, educator, and documentary filmmaker. His research interests include Asian American history, race and visual culture, and the history of California in the Pacific World. His current book project, tentatively entitled "Performing Chinatown: Hollywood, Tourism, and the Making of a Los Angeles Community," examines the social, economic, and political contexts through which representations of Chinese Americans in Los Angeles were produced and consumed during the Chinese exclusion era. The book project draws on oral histories, archival research, and analysis of film and related visual culture.

    A proud product of San Francisco’s public school system, William holds an MA in Asian American Studies from UCLA and a PhD in Ethnic Studies from UC Berkeley. Prior to entering his doctoral program, William worked for eight years as a high school history teacher in California. He also served as a community historian with the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California in Los Angeles Chinatown. His documentary More to the Chinese Side (co-directed with Sharon Heijin Lee in 2003) was a finalist for the Golden Reel Award at the Visual Communications Asian American Film Festival in Los Angeles. The video is a first-person examination of his family history, mixed race identity, and Chinese American community. His writing and research have appeared in a variety of publications including Pacific Historical Review, Amerasia Journal, and the CHSSC's Gum Saan Journal.

    In 2019, the Western History Association awarded William the Vicki Ruiz Award for Best Journal article on Race in the North American West for his essay, "A Night in Old Chinatown: American Orientalism, China Relief Fundraising, and the 1938 Moon Festival in Los Angeles" published in Pacific Historical Review.

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

  • Peter Graham

    Peter Graham

    Associate Professor of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWhat physics lies beyond the Standard Model and how can we discover it?

    Professor Graham is broadly interested in theoretical physics beyond the Standard Model which often involves cosmology, astrophysics, general relativity, and even atomic physics. The Standard Model leaves many questions unanswered including the nature of dark matter and the origins of the weak scale, the cosmological constant, and the fundamental fermion masses. These clues are a guide to building new theories beyond the Standard Model. He recently proposed a new solution to the hierarchy problem which uses dynamical relaxation in the early universe instead of new physics at the weak scale.

    Professor Graham is also interested in inventing novel experiments to discover such new physics, frequently using techniques from astrophysics, condensed matter, and atomic physics. He is a proposer and co-PI of the Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment (CASPEr) and the DM Radio experiment. CASPEr uses nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to search for axion dark matter. DM Radio uses high precision magnetometry and electromagnetic resonators to search for hidden photon and axion dark matter. He has also proposed techniques for gravitational wave detection using atom interferometry.

    Current areas of focus:

    Theory beyond the Standard Model
    Dark matter models and detection
    Novel experimental proposals for discovering new physics such as axions and gravitational waves
    Understanding results from experiments ranging from the LHC to early universe cosmology

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    The Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.