School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 61-70 of 117 Results

  • Alison McQueen

    Alison McQueen

    Associate Professor of Political Science

    BioAlison McQueen is an Assistant Professor of Political Science. Her research focuses on early modern political theory and the history of International Relations thought. Alison’s first book project, Political Realism in Apocalyptic Times, traces the responses of three canonical political realists—Niccolò Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and Hans Morgenthau—to hopes and fears about the end of the world. Her second book project examines changes in Thomas Hobbes' strategies of scriptural and religious argument over the course of his political works. Her other ongoing research projects explore religion in early modern political thought, methods of textual interpretation, and the normative commitments of political realism.

  • Melissa Mesinas

    Melissa Mesinas

    Ph.D. Student in Education, admitted Autumn 2015
    Ph.D. Minor, Psychology
    SU Student - Summer, GSE Dean's Office Operations

    BioMelissa is a Ph.D. candidate in the Graduate School of Education in the Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS) program. She received her B.A. in Psychology and Hispanic Studies from Scripps College in 2012. After receiving her undergraduate degree, Melissa worked for her alma mater in the Offices of Admissions and Student Affairs as she led the First-Generation at Scripps program. She then went on to Puno, Peru on a Fulbright English Teaching Assistantship where she conducted research focused on the educational experiences of Aymara and Quechua communities. Additionally, Melissa has conducted cross-cultural research on Indigenous Mexican communities living in the United States. During this time, Melissa realized her passion lay in community-based outreach and research. Her research interests center on the cultural practices immigrant communities maintain throughout generations and specifically examines its impact on learning, development, and well-being of youth. She is a recipient of the Stanford Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE) Doctoral Fellowship, Ford Foundation Predoctoral Fellowship, and the Gates Millennium Scholarship.

  • Lynn Meskell

    Lynn Meskell

    Shirley R. and Leonard W. Ely, Jr. Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioLynn Meskell is the Shirley and Leonard Ely Professor of Humanities and Sciences in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University, and AD White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University (2019-2015). She is also Honorary Professor in the School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. She is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. Over the past twenty years she has been awarded grants and fellowships including those from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Australian Research Council, the American Academy in Rome, the School of American Research, Oxford University and Cambridge University. She is the founding editor of the Journal of Social Archaeology. Lynn has broad theoretical interests including socio-politics, archaeological ethics, global heritage, materiality, as well as feminist and postcolonial theory. Lynn’s earlier research examined natural and cultural heritage in South Africa, the archaeology of figurines and burial in Neolithic Turkey and social life in New Kingdom Egypt.

    Recently she conducted an institutional ethnography of UNESCO World Heritage, tracing the politics of governance and sovereignty and the subsequent implications for multilateral diplomacy, international conservation, and heritage rights. Employing archival and ethnographic analysis, her new book A Future in Ruins: UNESCO, World Heritage, and the Dream of Peace (2018, OUP New York), reveals UNESCO’s early forays into a one-world archaeology and its later commitments to global heritage. Some other recent books and edited collections include The Nature of Culture: The New South Africa (2011, Blackwells) and Global Heritage: A Reader (2015, Blackwells). Her new fieldwork explores monumental regimes of research and preservation around World Heritage sites in India and how diverse actors and agencies address the needs of living communities. Given the sheer scale and complexity of archaeological heritage in India, no nation presents a more fraught and compelling array of challenges to preserving its past.