School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-50 of 88 Results

  • Francisco Ramirez

    Francisco Ramirez

    Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGlobalization and impact of human rights regime;rise of human rights education and analysis of civics, history, and social studies textbooks; transformations in the status of women in society and in higher education; universities as institutions and organizations;education, science and development

  • Michael Ramsaur

    Michael Ramsaur

    Professor (Teaching) of Theater and Performance Studies, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEducation for Theatrical Lighting Design, nationally and internationally. Lighting design for Musicals.

  • Jianghong Rao

    Jianghong Rao

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) and, by courtesy, of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProbe chemistry and nanotechnology for molecular imaging and diagnostics

  • Gary Rasberry

    Gary Rasberry

    Associate Professor of English

    BioVaughn Rasberry studies African American literature, global Cold War culture, the European Enlightenment and its critics, postcolonial theory, and philosophical theories of modernity. As a Fulbright scholar in 2008-09, he taught in the American Studies department at the Humboldt University Berlin and lectured on African American literature throughout Germany. His current book project, Race and the Totalitarian Century, questions the notion that desegregation prompted African American writers and activists to acquiesce in the normative claims of postwar liberalism. Challenging accounts that portray black cultural workers in various postures of reaction to larger forces--namely U.S. liberalism or Soviet communism--his project argues instead that many writers were involved in a complex national and global dialogue with totalitarianism, the defining geopolitical discourse of the twentieth century.

    His article, "'Now Describing You': James Baldwin and Cold War Liberalism," appears in an edited volume titled James Baldwin: America and Beyond (University of Michigan Press, 2011). A review essay, "Black Cultural Politics at the End of History," appears in the winter 2012 issue of American Literary History. An article, "Invoking Totalitarianism: Liberal Democracy versus the Global Jihad in Boualem Sansal's The German Mujahid," appears in the spring 2014 special issue of Novel: a Forum on Fiction. For Black History Month, he published an op-ed essay, "The Shape of African American Geopolitics," in Al Jazeera English.

    An Annenberg Faculty Fellow at Stanford (2012-14), he has also received fellowships from the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and the Humanities Center at the University of Pittsburgh.

    Vaughn also teaches in collaboration with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and the programs in Modern Thought and Literature, African and African American Studies, and American Studies.

  • Michael Rau

    Michael Rau

    Assistant Professor of Theater and Performance Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a live performance creator and director. I direct theater, musicals, opera, and I create digital media projects. I am always looking for new projects and interdisciplinary collaborations. I am interested in ways that technology can be used to tell stories, in virtual reality and games, and in live performance situations. I have created immersive theater pieces, and I enjoy working with new playwrights and writers to develop and shape their work.

  • Jennifer L. Raymond

    Jennifer L. Raymond

    Professor of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the neural mechanisms of learning, using a combination of behavioral, neurophysiological, and computational approaches. The model system we use is a form of cerebellum-dependent learning that regulates eye movements.

  • sean reardon

    sean reardon

    Professor of Poverty and Inequality in Education, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe causes and patterns of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic achievement disparities;

    The effects of school integration policies on segregation patterns and educational outcomes;

    Income inequality and its educational and social consequences.

    http://cepa.stanford.edu/sean-reardon

  • Kristy Red-Horse

    Kristy Red-Horse

    Associate Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiovascular developmental biology

  • Carol Reeb

    Carol Reeb

    Basic Life Res Scientist

    BioMy primary research uses the tools of molecular biology and the theory of population genetics to understand patterns of genetic diversity found in aquatic species, especially highly migratory marine species that are commercially harvested and/or vulnerable to extinction and protected by law. Our work is applicable to monitoring population productivity, improving stock assessments, and sustainably managing fishery populations for the future.

  • Byron Reeves

    Byron Reeves

    Paul C. Edwards Professor of Communication, Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy and Professor, by courtesy, of Education

    BioByron Reeves received a B.F.A. in graphic design from Southern Methodist University and his M.A. and a Ph.D. in communication from Michigan State University.

    Prior to joining Stanford in 1985, he taught at the University of Wisconsin where he was director of graduate studies and associate chair of the Mass Communication Research Center.

    He teaches courses in mass communication theory and research, with particular emphasis on psychological processing of interactive media. His research includes message processing, social cognition, and social and emotion responses to media, and has been published in books of collected studies as well as such journals as Human Communication Research, Journal of Social Issues, Journal of Broadcasting, and Journalism Quarterly. He is co-author of The Media Equation: How People Treat Computers, Television, and New Media Like Real People and Places (Cambridge University Press).

    His research has been the basis for a number of new media products for companies such as Microsoft, IBM, and Hewlett-Packard, in the areas of voice interfaces, automated dialogue systems and conversational agents. He is currently working on the applications of multi-player game technology to learning and the conduct of serious work.

  • Maurice Rehm

    Maurice Rehm

    Professor of Theater and Performance Studies and of Classics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStanford Repertory Theater (SRT) is set to launch its 17th summer festival, this summer (2015) dedicated to the work of Noel Coward. Our mainstage production is *Hay Fever* and secondstage production *A Coward Cabaret*. The festival includes an all-day community symposium, continuing studies course *Theater on Theater*, and film festival on Coward. Our 2016 SRT Festival will focus on "Theater and Labor" with productions of Naomi Wallace's *Slaughter City* and Clifford Odets' *Waiting for Lefty."

    I continue working on a long-term project entitled "Bilingual Beckett," which has included Stanford Repertory Theater's bilingual production of Samuel Beckett's *Happy Days/Oh les beaux jours," performed at Stanford, San Francisco, Montpellier, and Paris.

    Professor Eleni Papalexiou at the University of the Peloponnese and I are collaborating to develop a summer institute in the Argolid, "Ancient Tragedies/Modern Stages," exploring contemporary approaches to staging Greek tragedy.

    In winter 2016, SRT will remount "Words and Images to End All War," a theater piece I developed this year on World War I, supported by Stanford Arts Institute, Stanford Continuing Studies, TAPS, and Art and Art History.

    SRT's "Comparative Clytemnestra" (performance/lecture focusing on the various treatments of Clytemnestra in Greek tragedy, with actress Courtney Walsh) will travel to New Zealand and Australia in the fall of 2015. This work will find its way into the revision of my 1992 *Greek Tragic Theatre,* which will come out in a new version entitled *Understanding Greek Tragedy* in 2016

  • Robert Reich

    Robert Reich

    Professor of Political Science and, by courtesy, of Education

    BioRob Reich is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education, at Stanford University. He is the director of the Center for Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), and associate director of the Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. His scholarship in political theory engages with the work of social scientists and engineers. His next book is Digital Technology and Democratic Theory (edited with Helene Landemore and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press). He is the author of Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (Princeton University Press, 2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, University of Chicago Press, 2016). He is also the author of several books on education: Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (University of Chicago Press, 2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, University of Chicago Press, 2013).

    Reich is the recipient of multiple teaching awards, including the Walter J. Gores award, Stanford’s highest honor for teaching. He was a sixth grade teacher at Rusk Elementary School in Houston, Texas before attending graduate school. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review, of Giving Tuesday, and at the Spencer Foundation.

  • James Reichert

    James Reichert

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    BioProf. Reichert's field of specialization is Meiji-Taishô literature. He is especially interested in looking at the way that male-male sexuality is represented in literary texts from this period. His dissertation examines the treatment of male sexuality found in such works as Okamoto Kisen's Sawamura Tanosuke akebono zôshi (1880), Yamada Bimyô's Shintaishika Wakashu sugata (1886), Natsume Sôseki's Nowaki (1907) and Mori Ogai's Vita Sexualis (1909). Prof. Reichert is currently working on an article about the aesthetics of decadence and perversion found in the work of mystery writer Edogawa Ranpo.

  • Daryn Reicherter

    Daryn Reicherter

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Reicherter the director of the Human Rights in Trauma Mental Health Laboratory.

    He has expertise in the area of cross-cultural trauma psychiatry, having spent more than a decade dedicated to providing a combination of administrative and clinical services in trauma mental health locally and internationally. He is on the List of Experts for the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and for the United Nations’ International Criminal Court. He is on the Fulbright Specialists Roster for his work in international trauma mental health. He is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Innovations in Global Health at Stanford University. He has created and cultivated new clinical rotations for residency education and medical school education in the community clinics that he operates. And he has created new opportunities for resident, medical student, and undergraduate education in Global Mental Health.

    He has also been involved in the creation of clinical mental health programs for underserved populations in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is the Faculty Adviser for the Stanford’s Free Clinic Mental Health Program.

    After receiving degrees in Psychobiology and Philosophy from the University of California at Santa Cruz, Dr. Reicherter completed his doctorate in medicine at New York Medical College. He completed internship and residency and served as Chief Resident at Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics.

  • Joan Ramon Resina

    Joan Ramon Resina

    Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures and of Comparative Literature

    BioProfessor Resina specializes in modern European literatures and cultures with an emphasis on the Spanish and Catalan traditions. He is Director of the Iberian Studies Program, housed in the Freeman Spogli Institute.

    Professor Resina is most recently the author of The Ghost in the Constitution: Historical Memory and Denial in Spanish Society. Liverpool University Press, 2017. This book is a reflection on the political use of historical memory focusing on the case of Spain. It analyses the philosophical implications of the transference of the notion of memory from the individual consciousness to the collective subject and considers the conflation of epistemology with ethics. A subtheme is the origin and transmission of political violence and its endurance in the form of “negationism”. Some chapters consider “traumatic” phenomena, such as the bombing of Guernica, the Republican exile, the destruction of Catalan society, and the Holocaust. The book engages controversial issues, such as the relation between memory and imputation, the obstacles to reconciliation, and the problems arising from the existence of not only different but also conflicting memories about the past. Another recent book is Josep Pla: The World Seen in the Form of Articles. Toronto University Press, 2017, which received the North American Catalan Society award for best book on Catalan Studies in 2019. This book condenses Pla's 47-volume work into 11 thematic units devoted to a central aspect of Pla's oeuvre. Resina explores the modalities of Pla's writing: stylistic, phenomenological, political, his relation to language, fiction, food, and landscape, and his approach to sexuality, women, and death. It introduces the reader to the colorful world of Catalonia's greatest 20th century writer through the author's gaze. Pla was a privileged observer of some of the crucial events of the 20th century, but he also captured the sensual infrastructure of his own country by recording every aspect of its reality.

    Previous books include Del Hispanismo a los Estudios Ibéricos. Una propuesta federativa para el ámbito cultural. Madrid: Biblioteca Nueva, 2009. In this book, Resina lays out the rationale for the overcoming of Hispanic Studies by a new discipline of Iberian Studies, contending that the field's response to the crisis of the Humanities should not lie in the retrenchment into the national philological traditions. Another publication since joining Stanford is Barcelona's Vocation of Modernity: Rise and Decline of an Urban Image (Stanford UP, 2008). This book traces the development of Barcelona's modern image since the late 19th century through the 20th century through texts that foreground key social and historical issues. The book ends with a highly critical view on the post-Olympic period.

    Resina has edited eleven collections of essays on varied topics, most recently Inscribed Identities: Writing as Self-Realization. Routledge, 2019, and Repetition, Recurrence, Returns, Lexington Books, 2019.

    He has published extensively in specialized journals, such as PMLA, MLN, New Literary History, and Modern Language Quarterly, and has contributed to a large number critical volumes. From 1999 to 2005 he was the Editor of Diacritics. For several years he has been a regular contributor to the Barcelona daily press. He has held teaching positions at Cornell University, the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and Northwestern University, as well as visiting appointments at foreign universities, and received awards such as the Alexander von Humboldt and the Fullbright fellowships, and a fellowship at the Internationales Kolleg Morphomata Center for Advanced Studies of the University of Cologne..

  • Seung Yon Rhee

    Seung Yon Rhee

    Associate Professor (By Courtesy), Biology

    BioSeung Yon (Sue) Rhee is a Senior Staff Member of Plant Biology Department at Carnegie Institution for Science. Her group strives to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive traits in the face of heat, drought, nutrient limitation, latitude and pests. Dr. Rhee’s group studies a variety of plants including models, orphan crops, medicinal and desert plants. More recently their work has involved studying a model nematode C. elegans, fungal pathogens, corals, and piexophilic bacterium. Her group employs computational modeling and targeted laboratory testing to study mechanisms of adaptation, functions of novel genes, organization and function of metabolic networks, and chemical and neuronal code of plant-animal interactions. Her group is also interested in developing translational research programs involving carbon sequestration by plants and biomass maximization under drought in bioenergy crops. Dr. Rhee received her B.A. in biology from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in biology from Stanford University. She has been an investigator at the Plant Biology Department of Carnegie Institution for Science since 1999.

  • Judith Richardson

    Judith Richardson

    Senior Lecturer in English

    BioJudith Richardson is a senior lecturer in English and program coordinator for American Studies. After receiving her PhD from Harvard University, Judith began teaching at Stanford in 2001, offering a range of courses on American literature, including classes on women writers, early American literature, autobiographies, and the literature of cities. The author of Possessions: The History and Uses of Haunting in the Hudson Valley (2003) she continues to write and lecture—at Stanford and beyond—on the history and literature of New York, and on issues of place and cultural memory more broadly. She is currently working on a book about nineteenth-century America’s “plant-mindedness,” its multivalent obsession with vegetable matters.

  • John Rick

    John Rick

    Associate Professor of Anthropology, Emeritus

    BioJohn Rick’s research focuses on prehistoric archaeology and anthropology of hunter-gatherers and initial hierarchical societies, stone tool analysis and digital methodologies, Latin America, Southwestern U.S. Rick’s major research efforts have included long-term projects studying early hunting societies of the high altitude puna grasslands of central Peru, and currently he directs a major research project at the monumental World Heritage site of Chavín de Huántar aimed at exploring the foundations of authority in the central Andes. Other field projects include work on early agricultural villages in the American Southwest, and a recently-initiated project on the Preclassic and Early Classic archaeology of the Guatemalan highlands near Panajachel, Atitlan. Current emphasis is on employing dimensional analytical digital techniques to the study of landscape and architecture, and on exploring the contexts and motivations for the development of sociopolitical inequalities.

  • John Rickford

    John Rickford

    J. E. Wallace Sterling Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a variationist sociolinguist (someone who studies language variation, often quantitatively, in relation to society and culture). I’m interested in understanding the relations between language variation, social structure and meaning, and language change, from descriptive, theoretical and applied perspectives.

    A lot of my work has been devoted to understanding the linguistic, social and stylistic constraints on specific linguistic variables, like the variation between Guyanese pronouns am, she, and her in “e like am” (deep creole, basilect) versus “e like she” (intermediate creole, mesolect) versus “He likes her” (standard English, acrolect). Or, to take an American example, the variation between all and like as quotative introducers in “He’s all/like ‘I don’t know’.” But I’ve also been concerned with trying to figure out where such variables come from historically, and whether they represent ongoing or completed change. I’ve also used the data from specific variables to address larger methodological and theoretical concepts in sociolinguistics, like how best to conceptualize the speech community and analyze linguistic variation by social class and ethnicity, or to assess the role of addressee versus topic in style shifting or the validity of the hyothesis that linguistic and social constraints are essentially independent (in their effects, not frequencies).

    My data come primarily from English-based creoles of the Caribbean (especially my native Guyanese Creole, but also Jamaican and Barbadian) and from colloquial American English (especially African American Vernacular English, but also, recently, from computer corpora, like Google newsgroup data). I’ve also been interested, increasingly since the 1990s, in how sociolinguistic research can be applied to help us understand and overcome the challenges that vernacular and creole speakers face in schools, where standard/mainstream varieties are expected.

  • Cecilia Ridgeway

    Cecilia Ridgeway

    Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in the role that social hierarchies in everyday social relations play in the larger processes of stratification and inequality in a society. My research focuses on interpersonal status hierarchies, which are hierarchies of esteem and influence, and the significance of these hierarchies for inequalities based on gender, race, and social class.

  • Jessica Riskin

    Jessica Riskin

    Professor of History

    BioJessica Riskin received her B.A. from Harvard University and her Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. She taught at MIT for several years before coming to Stanford, and has also taught at Iowa State University and at Sciences Po, Paris. Her research interests include early modern science, politics and culture and the history of scientific explanation.

    Riskin is the author of Science in the Age of Sensibility: The Sentimental Empiricists of the French Enlightenment (University of Chicago Press, 2002), which won the American Historical Association's J. Russell Major Prize for best book in English on any aspect of French history, and the editor of Genesis Redux: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Artificial Life (University of Chicago Press, 2007) and, with Mario Biagioli, of Nature Engaged: Science in Practice from the Renaissance to the Present (Palgrave, 2012). Her latest book is The Restless Clock: A History of the Centuries-Long Debate about What Makes Living Things Tick (University of Chicago Press, 2016).

  • Douglas Rivers

    Douglas Rivers

    Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioDouglas Rivers is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. He is the president and CEO of YouGov/Polimetrix.

  • Donald Roberts

    Donald Roberts

    Thomas More Storke Professor, Emeritus

    BioDonald Roberts received his A.B. from Columbia University (1961) and his M.A. from the University of California at Berkeley (1963). He earned his Ph.D. in communication at Stanford in 1968, then became a member of the department faculty, serving as Director of the Institute for Communication Research from 1985-1990 and from 1999-2001. He chaired the department from 1990-1996.

    Roberts teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on communication theory and research and on children, youth, and media. His primary area of research concerns how children and adolescents use and respond to media, a topic on which he has written extensively (e.g., chapters in The Handbook of Communication, Learning from Television: Psychological and Education Research, The International Encyclopedia of Communications, The Handbook of Children and the Media,and The Handbook of Adolescent Psychology).

    He has also written comprehensive reviews of the literature on the effects of mass communication for the Annual Review of Psychology and for the revised edition of the Handbook of Social Psychology, and co-authored a chapter on public opinion processes in the Handbook of Communication Science.

    Roberts helped to design a parental advisory system to label violence, sex/nudity, and language for the computer software industry which has been adapted by the Internet Content Rating Association for use on the World Wide Web. He has spoken on the issue of content labeling and advisories internationally (e.g., Mexico, Korea, Australia, South Africa), and has published several articles dealing with content labeling.

    He has consulted with a number of companies involved in producing children’s media (e.g., Filmation, ABC-Disney, MGM Animation, Sunbow Entertainment, Nelvana Ltd., and KidsWB!), and currently functions as Educational Director for DIC Entertainment, helping to develop content to meet the FCC’s requirements for educational programming for children. Roberts also served on the board of advisors of MediaScope, a nonprofit organization founded to promote constructive depictions of social issues in film, television, music, and video games, and was a planner and panelist for Vice President Al Gore’s Conference on Families and Media.

    Roberts is co-editor of The Process and Effects of Mass Communication and co-author of Television and Human Behavior, It’s Not Only Rock and Roll: Popular Music in the Lives of Adolescents and Kids on Media in America: Patterns of Use at the Millennium.

  • Eric Roberts

    Eric Roberts

    The Charles Simonyi Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioFrom 1990-2002, Roberts served as associate chair and director of undergraduate studies for the Computer Science Department before being appointed as Senior Associate Dean in the School of Engineering and later moving on to become Faculty Director for Interdisciplinary Science Education in the office of the VPUE.

  • Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Laura Roberts, MD, MA

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Psychology
    On Leave from 07/29/2020 To 08/28/2020

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Roberts has performed numerous empirical studies of contemporary ethics issues in medicine and health policy and has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Energy, the National Alliance of Schizophrenia and Depression, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation, and other private and public foundations.

  • Regina Lee Roberts

    Regina Lee Roberts

    Librarian for Communication & Journalism, Anthropology, FGSS, & Lusophone Africa, Social Sciences Resource Group

    Current Role at StanfordLibrarian for Anthropology, Communication & Journalism, Feminist Studies, & Lusophone Africa.

  • Steven O. Roberts

    Steven O. Roberts

    Assistant Professor of Psychology

    BioHow do we conceptualize social groups and how do our concepts guide how we perceive and evaluate individuals? Broadly, my research centers around themes of group-based boundaries and hierarchies, among both children and adults.

    Check out my lab webpage here: https://scd.stanford.edu/