School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 21-30 of 34 Results

  • Eric Roberts

    Eric Roberts

    The Charles Simonyi Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioFrom 1990-2002, Roberts served as associate chair and director of undergraduate studies for the Computer Science Department before being appointed as Senior Associate Dean in the School of Engineering and later moving on to become Faculty Director for Interdisciplinary Science Education in the office of the VPUE.

  • Regina Lee Roberts

    Regina Lee Roberts

    Head of Social Science Resource Group, Librarian, Social Sciences Resource Group

    Current Role at StanfordHead of the Social Sciences Resource Group & Librarian for Anthropology, Communication & Journalism, Feminist Studies, & Lusophone Africa.

  • Aileen Robinson

    Aileen Robinson

    Assistant Professor of Theater and Performance Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAileen K. Robinson is a historian of performance and technology with specializations in 18th and 19th century British theatre and Black cultural performances. Working across the history of science, technology, and theatre, Robinson explores how systems of knowledge, connected to the body and the object, overlapped to produce practices of research, dissemination, and valuation.

    Robinson's current book manuscript explores intersections between technological, scientific, and theatrical knowledge in early nineteenth-century science museums. She investigates how theatrical performances and magic shows drew upon technological innovations and formed unique methods for disseminating scientific knowledge. She teaches across the history of science and performance, magic and technology, eighteenth- and nineteenth-century stagecraft, and 19th and 20th-century Black artistic production.

  • Jonathan Rosa

    Jonathan Rosa

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Linguistics, of Anthropology and of Comparative Literature

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am currently working on two book projects through which I am continuing to develop insights into ethnoracial, linguistic, and educational formations. The first offers frameworks for understanding ethnoracial contradictions across distinctive societal contexts by interweaving ethnographic analysis of diasporic Puerto Rican experiences and broader constructions of Latinidad that illustrate race and ethnicity as colonial and communicative predicaments. The second spotlights decolonial approaches to the creation of collective well-being through educational and societal transformations based on longstanding community collaborations in Chicago.

  • Michael Rosenfeld

    Michael Rosenfeld

    Professor of Sociology

    BioI am a social demographer who studies race, ethnicity, and family structure, the family's effect on children, and the history of the family. I am interested in mate selection as a social as well as a personal process.

  • Janice Ross

    Janice Ross

    Professor (Teaching) of Theater and Performance Studies, Emerita

    BioJanice Ross, Professor in the Department of Theatre and Performance Studies and former faculty director of ITALIC, Stanford's residence based Freshman arts immersion program, has a BA with Honors from UC Berkeley and MA and Ph.D degrees from Stanford. Her research interests and books focus on the intersections of social issues and their expression through performance. They include, Like A Bomb Going Off: Leonid Yakobson and Ballet as Resistance in Soviet Russia (Yale Univ. Press 2015), Anna Halprin: Experience as Dance (University of California Press 2007),winner of a de la Torre Bueno Award 2008 Special Citation, San Francisco Ballet at 75 (Chronicle Books 2007), Moving Lessons: The Beginning of Dance in American Education, (University of Wisconsin Press 2001/ University of Florida Press, Second Edition/2020) and, co-edited with Susan Manning and Rebecca Schneider, The Futures of Dance Studies, (University of Michigan Press (2020). Her research interests concern performance and social justice with a particular focus on tensions between political and aesthetic expression. Her essays on dance have been published in several anthologies including The Oxford Handbook of Contemporary Ballet (Oxford Univ. Press, 2020), The Aging Body in Dance: A Cross Cultural Perspective, (Routledge, 2017),The Oxford Handbook of Improvisation (2019) Soloists and The Modern Dance Canon (Univ. Press of Florida, 2012), Dignity in Motion: Dance, Human Rights and Social Justice, edited by Naomi Jackson (Scarecrow Press 2008), Perspectives on Israeli and Jewish Dance, ed. Judith Brin Ingber, (Wayne State University Press, 2008), Performance and Ritual, edited by Mark Franco (Routledge 2007), Everything Was Possible (Re) Inventing Dance in the 1960s, edited by Sally Banes (University of Wisconsin Press 2003), Caught by Surprise: Essays on Art and Improvisation, edited by Ann Cooper Albright and David Gere (Wesleyan University press 2003). Her awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Stanford Humanities Center Fellowships, a Fulbright Fellowship to Israel, as well as research grants from the Iris Litt Fund of the Clayman Institute for Research on Women and Gender, the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture, the 2016 CORD Award for Outstanding Contributions to Dance Research , an NYU Fellowship for the Center for Ballet and the Arts (2018) and a Bogliasco Foundation Fellowship (Italy 2022). Her articles on dance have appeared in numerous publications including The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times. She is past President of the international Society of Dance History Scholars.

  • Lee Ross

    Lee Ross

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAttributional processes and biases. Strategies and shortcomings in lay judgment and decision making. Basis of (and biases in) knowledge about self and others; egocentrism and "naive realism." Sources of interpersonal and intergroup conflict. Barriers to conflict resolution and techniques for overcoming such barriers.

  • Gregory Rosston

    Gregory Rosston

    Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioGreg Rosston is Director of the Public Policy program at Stanford University, the Gordon Cain Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and Professor of Economics (by courtesy). He teaches Economics and Public Policy courses on competition policy and strategy, economic policy analysis, and writing and rhetoric.

    Dr. Rosston served as Deputy Chief Economist at the Federal Communications Commission working on the implementation of the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and the design and implementation of the first ever spectrum auctions in the United States. In 2011, he was Senior Economist for Transactions for the Federal Communications Commission for the proposed AT&T – T-Mobile transaction. He served as a member and co-chair of the Department of Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee.

    Dr. Rosston received his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University and his A.B. with Honors from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Rosston has written extensively on the application of economics to telecommunications and competition issues. He has advised companies and governments regarding auctions and served as a consultant to various organizations including the World Bank and the Federal Communications Commission, and as a board member and advisor to high technology, financial, and startup companies. He serves as Vice Chair of the Board of the Stanford Federal Credit Union, as a Board member of the Nepal Youth Foundation and as an Advisory Board member of Sustainable Conservation and the Technology Policy Institute.