School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 10 Results

  • Mehran Sahami

    Mehran Sahami

    Professor (Teaching) of Computer Science

    BioMehran Sahami is a Professor and Associate Chair for Education in the Computer Science department at Stanford University. He is also the Robert and Ruth Halperin University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he was a Senior Research Scientist at Google. His research interests include computer science education, artificial intelligence, and web search. He is co-chair of the ACM/IEEE-CS joint task force on Computer Science Curricula 2013, which is responsible for creating curricular guidelines for college programs in Computer Science at an international level.

  • Daniel Schwartz

    Daniel Schwartz

    Dean of the Graduate School of Education and the Nomellini-Olivier Professor of Educational Technology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstructional methods, transfer of learning and assessment, mathematical development, teachable agents, cognition, and cognitive neuroscience.

  • Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main areas of interest are (1) the activities of CCARH in developing searchable repositories of encoded musical data; (2) the intellectual-property questions that these and other digital-music projects raise; and (3) personal historical research primarily on Venetian topics (at present: Antonio Vivaldi, Bernardo Canal).

  • Krishna Shenoy

    Krishna Shenoy

    Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology and of Bioengineering

    BioOur group (Neural Prosthetic Systems Laboratory, NPSL; directed by Prof. Shenoy) conducts neuroscience, neuroengineering, and translational research to better understand how the brain controls movement, and to design medical systems to assist people with movement disabilities. Our neuroscience research investigates the neural basis of movement preparation and generation using a combination of electro-/opto-physiological, behavioral, computational and theoretical techniques. Our neuroengineering research investigates the design of high-performance and robust neural prostheses. Neural prostheses are also known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). These systems translate neural activity from the brain into control signals for prosthetic devices, which can assist people with paralysis by restoring lost motor functions. Our translational research, including an FDA pilot clinical trial termed BrainGate2, are conducted as part of the our Neural Prosthetic Translational Laboratory (NPTL; co-directed by Profs. Shenoy & Henderson).

  • Yoav Shoham

    Yoav Shoham

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioYoav Shoham is professor emeritus of computer science at Stanford University. A leading AI expert, Prof. Shoham is Fellow of AAAI, ACM and the Game Theory Society. Among his awards are the IJCAI Research Excellence Award, the AAAI/ACM Allen Newell Award, and the ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award. His online Game Theory course has been watched by close to a million people. Prof. Shoham has founded several AI companies, including TradingDynamics (acquired by Ariba), Katango and Timeful (both acquired by Google), and AI21 Labs. Prof. Shoham also chairs the AI Index initiative (www.AIindex.org), which tracks global AI activity and progress, and WeCode (www.wecode.org.il), a nonprofit initiative to train high-quality programmers from disadvantaged populations.

  • Meghan Sumner

    Meghan Sumner

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    BioI am an Associate Professor in the Department of Linguistics at Stanford University. I conduct research examining the representations and mechanisms listeners use to understand spoken language, and how linguistic and social factors affect speech perception and word recognition. My current research centers around two main themes: (1) Investigating the effects social information cued by different voices have on memory, and the way social biases result in misremembering, and (2) Using foundational psycholinguistic methodologies to understand how speakers and speaker groups who are new to a community (e.g., the case of Syrian refugees in Germany) accommodate to cultural norms within their native languages.