School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 41 Results

  • Walter Scheidel

    Walter Scheidel

    Dickason Professor in the Humanities and Professor of History

    BioWalter Scheidel's research ranges from ancient social and economic history and premodern historical demography to the comparative and transdisciplinary world history of inequality, state formation, and human welfare. He is particularly interested in connecting the humanities, the social sciences, and the life sciences.

    Scheidel is the author or (co-)editor of 20 books, has published close to 250 articles, chapters, and reviews, and has lectured in 29 countries. His most recent books are "Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity" (2019), "The Science of Roman History: Biology, Climate, and the Future of the Past" (2018, ed.), "The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century" (2017; 12 translations), "On Human Bondage: After Slavery and Social Death" (2017, co-edited with John Bodel), "State Power in Ancient China and Rome" (2015, ed.), and "Fiscal Regimes and the Political Economy of Premodern States" (2015, co-edited with Andrew Monson). Other key publications include "Rome and China: Comparative Perspectives on Ancient World Empires" (2009, ed.), "The Cambridge Economic History of the Greco-Roman World" (2007, co-edited with Ian Morris and Richard Saller), and "Death on the Nile: Disease and the Demography of Roman Egypt" (2001). He has also written for the New York Times, Financial Times, Atlantic, Economist, Le Monde, Foreign Affairs, Boston Globe, Huffington Post, Spectator, and other media outlets.

    Scheidel recently completed "The Oxford World History of Empire" (2 vols, co-edited with Peter Bang and the late Christopher Bayly). He is currently working on the Roman monarchy in global comparative context and is planning a very short book on the future of ancient history and a longer one on how modernizing developmental discontinuities have come to enrich, divide and threaten humankind. He launched an international research initiative for the comparative study of ancient Mediterranean and Chinese empires, co-founded the "Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics," created the interactive web site "Orbis: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World," which has attracted over a million visitors and global media coverage, and is an editor of the monograph series "Oxford Studies in Early Empires" and a former editor of the journal "Historia." He was awarded a Mellon New Directions Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship, and is a Corresponding Member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

  • Londa Schiebinger

    Londa Schiebinger

    John L. Hinds Professor of the History of Science

    BioLonda Schiebinger is the John L. Hinds Professor of History of Science in the History Department at Stanford University and Director of the EU/US Gendered Innovations in Science, Health & Medicine, Engineering, and Environment Project. From 2004-2010, Schiebinger served as the Director of Stanford's Clayman Institute for Gender Research. She is a leading international authority on gender and science. Over the past thirty years, Schiebinger's work has been devoted to teasing apart three analytically distinct but interlocking pieces of the gender and science puzzle: the history of women's participation in science; gender in the structure of scientific institutions; and the gendering of human knowledge.She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

  • Thomas Schultz

    Thomas Schultz

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied with John Perry (at Oberlin and the University of Texas) and Leonard Stein.

    Solo recitals in Berlin, Vienna (Schoenberg Festival), Kyoto, Seoul, New York, San Francisco, Berkeley, Korea’s Tongyoung Festival, the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, and the April in Santa Cruz Festival.

    Appearances as soloist at Alice Tully Hall (NYC), the Other Minds Festival (San Francisco), and the Colorado Music Festival.

    Chamber music performances with Robert Craft’s 20th Century Classics Ensemble (NYC), the Da Camera Society of Houston, the San Francisco Contemporary Music Players, and the St. Lawrence String Quartet.

    Recordings on MusicMasters, Newport Classics, Seoul Records. Recording of solo works for Belgian Radio (Brussels).

    Has worked closely with eminent composers including John Cage, Morton Feldman, Elliott Carter, Frederic Rzewski, Christian Wolff, Hyo-shin Na, Earle Brown, and Jonathan Harvey, and has given recitals and lectures devoted to the music of Cage and Rzewski.

  • Fatoumata Seck

    Fatoumata Seck

    Assistant Professor of French and Italian

    BioFatoumata Seck is a literary scholar with an interdisciplinary background. She specializes in francophone African and Caribbean studies with an emphasis on cultural and diaspora studies, postcolonial theory and political economy. Her research brings together literary criticism, anthropological theory and various approaches to materialism to investigate the impact of economic thought and economic processes on Senegalese works of fiction. Her book manuscript "Materialist Imaginaries: Fiction, Economy and the Postcolony" develops methodologies for studying the influence of post-colonial neoliberal reforms on the Senegalese social fabric through the examination of both cultural production and cultural practice. It establishes how Senegalese writers, filmmakers, and artists have engaged in humanistic ways of rethinking economic ideologies and practices through fictional narratives as well as way in which these works inform notions of value, debt, money, and capital.
    Seck is a former Assistant Professor at the City University of New York, College of Staten Island (CUNY/CSI) where she has taught and conducted research on literature, film, and cultures of the francophone world and the African diaspora and served as coordinator for the French program. Seck holds a Ph.D. in French with a minor in anthropology and a certificate in African Studies from Stanford University as well as degrees from the University of Georgia and Université Jean Moulin Lyon III. Seck is a native Wolof and French speaker; her teaching cuts across various geographical areas and linguistic traditions (Wolof, French, English, Spanish and Portuguese) and is informed by critical theory on race, gender and ethnicity. In addition to courses about francophone cultures and societies offered at the Division of Literature Cultures and Languages (DLCL), Seck offers courses about the African diaspora in Europe and the Americas at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE). She is also a Center for African Studies (CAS) affiliate faculty member with projects and courses that engage the landscape of African humanities. Her work has been featured in different venues such as The Journal of African Cultural Studies, The Journal of Haitian Studies, Études Littéraires Africaines and Le Monde Afrique.

  • Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main areas of interest are (1) the activities of CCARH in developing searchable repositories of encoded musical data; (2) the intellectual-property questions that these and other digital-music projects raise; and (3) personal historical research primarily on Venetian topics (at present: Antonio Vivaldi, Bernardo Canal).