School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 51-100 of 143 Results

  • Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Eleanor Selfridge-Field

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy main areas of interest are (1) the activities of CCARH in developing searchable repositories of encoded musical data; (2) the intellectual-property questions that these and other digital-music projects raise; and (3) personal historical research primarily on Venetian topics (at present: Antonio Vivaldi, Bernardo Canal).

  • Leonardo Senatore

    Leonardo Senatore

    Associate Professor of Physics and of Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Senatore is a theoretical physicist working to try to understand how the universe began and evolved to its present form. While this is a very interesting and fundamental question per se, from the understanding of how the universe evolved in the first few moments we can infer more about the laws of physics at the smallest distances and highest energies. Cosmological observations are providing us with a huge amount of data, which allows us to test our theories about inflation, eternal inflation and its alternatives, and about the growth of structures in our universe, to an unprecedented level. Senatore tries to bridge the gap between the speculative ideas about the early universe and their possible confirmation in the data.

    Current areas of focus:
    - Effective field theory of inflation
    - Primordial non-Gaussianities
    - Effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures
    - Eternal inflation and quantum effects in inflation
    - Analysis of cosmological data

  • Charif Shanahan

    Charif Shanahan

    Lecturer

    BioCharif Shanahan is the author of Into Each Room We Enter without Knowing (Southern Illinois University Press, 2017), winner of the Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award and a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry and the Publishing Triangle’s Thom Gunn Award. He is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literature Fellowship; the Wallace Stegner Fellowship in Poetry; a Fulbright Senior Scholar Grant to Morocco; and residency fellowships from Cave Canem Foundation, MacDowell Colony, Millay Colony for the Arts, La Maison Baldwin in St Paul, France, and the Rauschenberg Foundation, among other honors and recognitions. Former Programs Director of the Poetry Society of America, he has taught poetry at California College of the Arts (CCA), Collegio di Milano (Italy), Dartmouth College, New York University, and Stanford University, where he is a Jones Lecturer in Poetry.

  • Michael Shanks

    Michael Shanks

    Professor of Classics

    BioResearch interests:

    design history and research; archaeological theory; heritage studies and archaeologies of the contemporary past; the archaeology of Grece-Roman urbanism; the regional archaeology of the English-Scottish borders.

    Recent books:

    Archaeology in the making: conversations through a discipline. Edited with Bill Rathje and Chris Witmore. Routledge 2013.

    Archaeology: the discipline of things. With Bjørnar Olsen, Tim Webmoor and Chris Witmore. University of California Press, 2012.

    The archaeological imagination. Left Coast Press, 2012.

    Archaeologies of presence: art, performance and the persistence of being. Edited with Nick Kaye and Gabriella Giannachi. Routledge, 2012.

    Current projects:

    An archaeology of antiquity. With Gary Devore. For Oxford University Press.

    The Revs Program at Stanford. Automotive archaeology.

    From Tyne to Tweed. An archaeology of the English-Scottish borders, including excavations of the Roman town of Binchester.

    http://mshanks.com

  • Carla Shatz

    Carla Shatz

    Sapp Family Provostial Professor, David Starr Jordan Director, Stanford Bio-X and Professor of Biology and of Neurobiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe goal of research in the Shatz Laboratory is to discover how brain circuits are tuned up by experience during critical periods of development both before and after birth by elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that transform early fetal and neonatal brain circuits into mature connections. To discover mechanistic underpinnings of circuit tuning, the lab has conducted functional screens for genes regulated by neural activity and studied their function for vision, learning and memory.

  • Vered Shemtov

    Vered Shemtov

    Eva Chernov Lokey Senior Lecturer in Hebrew Language and Literature

    BioVered Karti Shemtov is the Eva Chernov Lokey senior lecturer in the department of Comparative Literature and the Middle Eastern Program at Stanford University. She is the Coordinator of the Hebrew Language, Literature and Culture project. She served as the Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Jewish Studies until 2011. Some of Shemtov's recent publications include: Changing Rhythms: Towards a Theory of Prosody in Cultural Context, Bar Ilan Press, Israel 2012, “Hebrew Poetry: 1781-2010” Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics, Revised edition, July 2012, “Discontinuous Spaces in A. B Yehoshua’s Novel The Liberated Bride,” Intersecting Sights, Heksherim and BGU Press, 2010 and a co-edited volume (with Charlotte Fonrobert) on Jewish Conceptions and Practices of Space, JSS 2005.

  • Kang Shen

    Kang Shen

    Professor of Biology and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe connectivity of a neuron (its unique constellation of synaptic inputs and outputs) is essential for its function. Neuronal connections are made with exquisite accuracy between specific types of neurons. How each neuron finds its synaptic partners has been a central question in developmental neurobiology. We utilize the relatively simple nervous system of nematode C. elegans, to search for molecules that can specify synaptic connections and understand the molecular mechanisms of synaptic as

  • Zhi-Xun Shen

    Zhi-Xun Shen

    Paul Pigott Professor in Physical Sciences, Professor of Photon Science, of Physics and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Shen's main research interest lies in the area of condensed matter and materials physics, as well as the applications of materials and devices. He develops photon based innovative instrumentation and advanced experimental techniques, ranging from angle-resolved photoemission to microwave imaging, soft x-ray scattering and time domain spectroscopy and scattering. He has created a body of literature that advanced our understanding of quantum materials, including superconductors, semiconductors, novel magnets, topological insulators, novel carbon and electron emitters. He is best known for his discoveries of the momentum structure of anisotropic d-wave pairing gap and anomalous normal state pseudogap in high temperature superconductors. He has further leveraged the advanced characterization tool to make better materials through thin film and interface engineering.

  • Stephen Shenker

    Stephen Shenker

    Richard Herschel Weiland Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHow can ideas from nonperturbative approaches to quantum gravity be applied to cosmology and the interiors of black holes?

    Professor Shenker’s research focuses on string theory and M theory, with an emphasis on nonperturbative aspects, including matrix formulations.

  • Krishna Shenoy

    Krishna Shenoy

    Hong Seh and Vivian W. M. Lim Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurobiology and of Bioengineering

    BioOur group (Neural Prosthetic Systems Laboratory, NPSL; directed by Prof. Shenoy) conducts neuroscience, neuroengineering, and translational research to better understand how the brain controls movement, and to design medical systems to assist people with movement disabilities. Our neuroscience research investigates the neural basis of movement preparation and generation using a combination of electro-/opto-physiological, behavioral, computational and theoretical techniques. Our neuroengineering research investigates the design of high-performance and robust neural prostheses. Neural prostheses are also known as brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) and brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). These systems translate neural activity from the brain into control signals for prosthetic devices, which can assist people with paralysis by restoring lost motor functions. Our translational research, including an FDA pilot clinical trial termed BrainGate2, are conducted as part of the our Neural Prosthetic Translational Laboratory (NPTL; co-directed by Profs. Shenoy & Henderson).

  • Michael Shewmaker

    Michael Shewmaker

    Lecturer

    BioMichael Shewmaker is the recent winner of the Hollis Summers Poetry Prize and author of Penumbra (Ohio UP, 2017). His poems recently appear in Yale Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, Sewanee Review, Poetry Daily, Parnassus, Oxford American, Narrative, and elsewhere. Born in Texarkana, Texas, he earned an MFA from McNeese State University and a PhD in creative writing from Texas Tech University. He is a Jones Lecturer in poetry at Stanford University.

  • Gi-Wook Shin

    Gi-Wook Shin

    The Tong Yang, Korea Foundation, and Korea Stanford Alumni (KSA) Chair of Korean Studies and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsKorean democratization; Korean nationalism; U.S.-Korea relations; North Korean politics; reconciliation and cooperation in Northeast Asia; global talent; multiculturalism; inter-Korean relations

  • Yoav Shoham

    Yoav Shoham

    Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

    BioShoham's artificial intelligence work includes formalizing common-sense (including notions such as time, causation, and mental state), and multi-agent systems (including agent-oriented programming and coordination mechanisms). His current interests concern game theory pragmatics, and formal models of intention.

  • John Shoven

    John Shoven

    The Charles Schwab Professor of Economics, Emeritus

    BioJohn B. Shoven is the Trione Director of the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and the Charles R. Schwab Professor of Economics at Stanford. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He specializes in public finance and corporate finance and has published on Social Security, health economics, corporate and personal taxation, mutual funds, pension plans, economic demography and applied general equilibrium economics. His books include The Real Deal: The History and Future of Social Security, Yale University Press, 1999 and The Evolving Pension System, Brookings Institution Press, 2005. His most recent book is co-authored with former Secretary of State and Treasury George Shultz and deals with both Social Security and health care reform in the U.S. (Putting Our House in Order: A Guide to Social Security and Health Care Reform, WWNorton, 2008). He also recently published a research paper on new ways of measuring age (“New Age Thinking: Alternative Ways of Measuring Age, Their Relationship to Labor Force Participation, Government Policies and GDP,” NBER Working Paper No. 13476. October 2007). His journal publications appear in such places as the American Economic Review, Journal of Economic Perspectives, and the Journal of Public Economics. In total, he has published more than one hundred professional articles and twenty books.

    Professor Shoven is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of the Paul A. Samuelson Award for Outstanding Scholarly Writing on Lifelong Financial Security, and an award winning teacher at Stanford. He received his Ph.D in Economics from Yale University in 1973 and has been associated with Stanford ever since. He was Dean of Humanities and Sciences from 1993 to 1998. He is Chairman of the Board of Board of Cadence Design Systems and serves on the boards of American Century Funds, Exponent, Inc. and Financial Engines, Inc.

  • Eva Silverstein

    Eva Silverstein

    Professor of Physics

    BioWhat are the basic degrees of freedom and interactions underlying gravitational and particle physics? What is the mechanism behind the initial seeds of structure in the universe, and how can we test it using cosmological observations? Is there a holographic framework for cosmology that applies throughout the history of the universe, accounting for the effects of horizons and singularities? What new phenomena arise in quantum field theory in generic conditions such as finite density, temperature, or in time dependent backgrounds?

    Professor Silverstein attacks basic problems in several areas of theoretical physics. She develops concrete and testable mechanisms for cosmic inflation, accounting for its sensitivity to very high energy physics. This has led to a fruitful interface with cosmic microwave background research, contributing to a more systematic analysis of its observable phenomenology.
    Professor Silverstein also develops mechanisms for breaking supersymmetry and for stabilizing the extra dimensions of string theory to model the immense hierarchies between the cosmological horizon, electroweak, and Planck scales in nature. In addition, Professor Silverstein uses the ultraviolet completion of gravity afforded by string theory to address questions of quantum gravity, such as singularity resolution and the physics of black hole and cosmological horizons. Professor Silverstein also uses modern techniques in quantum field theory to model strongly coupled phenomena motivated by measurements in condensed matter physics.

    Areas of focus:
    - UV complete mechanisms and systematics of cosmic inflation, including string-theoretic versions of large-field inflation (with gravity wave CMB signatures) and novel mechanisms involving inflaton interactions (with non-Gaussian signatures in the CMB)
    -Systematic theory and analysis of primordial Non-Gaussianity, taking into account strongly non-linear effects in quantum field theory encoded in multi-point correlation functions 
    -Long-range interactions in string theory and implications for black hole physics
    - Concrete holographic models of de Sitter expansion in string theory, aimed at upgrading the AdS/CFT correspondence to cosmology
    - Mechanisms for non-Fermi liquid transport and $2k_F$ singularities from strongly coupled finite density quantum field theory
    - Mechanisms by which the extra degrees of freedom in string theory induce transitions and duality symmetries between spaces of different topology and dimensionality

  • Michael Simon

    Michael Simon

    Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPlanar cell polarity, cell shape and mobility, and control of cell fate

  • Robert Simoni

    Robert Simoni

    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Biology, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCholesterol in biological membranes; genetic mechanisms & cholesterol production

  • Nariman Skakov

    Nariman Skakov

    Assistant Professor of Slavic Languages and Literatures

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLate Modernist Experimentation and Stalinist Central Asia

  • Jan Skotheim

    Jan Skotheim

    Professor of Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy overarching goal is to understand how cell growth triggers cell division. Linking growth to division is important because it allows cells to maintain specific size range to best perform their physiological functions. For example, red blood cells must be small enough to flow through small capillaries, whereas macrophages must be large enough to engulf pathogens. In addition to being important for normal cell and tissue physiology, the link between growth and division is misregulated in cancer.

  • Julius Smith

    Julius Smith

    Professor of Music, and by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioSmith is a professor of music and (by courtesy) electrical engineering (Information Systems Lab) based at the Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics (CCRMA). Teaching and research pertain to music and audio applications of signal processing. Former software engineer at NeXT Computer, Inc., responsible for signal processing software pertaining to music and audio. For more, see https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jos/.

  • Matthew Smith

    Matthew Smith

    Professor of German Studies and of Theater and Performance Studies

    BioMatthew Wilson Smith's interests include modern theatre; modernism and media; and relations between technology, science, and the arts. His book The Nervous Stage: 19th-century Neuroscience and the Birth of Modern Theatre (Oxford, 2017) explores historical intersections between the performing arts and the neurological sciences and traces the construction of a “neural subject” over the course of the nineteenth century. His previous book, The Total Work of Art: From Bayreuth to Cyberspace (Routledge, 2007), presents a history and theory of modern artistic synthesis, placing such diverse figures as Wagner, Moholy-Nagy, Brecht, Riefenstahl, Disney, Warhol, and contemporary cyber-artists within a genealogy of totalizing performance. He is the editor of Georg Büchner: The Major Works, which appeared as a Norton Critical Edition in 2011, and the co-editor of Modernism and Opera, published by Johns Hopkins University Press in 2016. He previously held professorships at Cornell University and Boston University as well as visiting positions at Columbia University and Johannes Gutenberg-Universität (Mainz).