School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-14 of 14 Results

  • Melinda Takeuchi

    Melinda Takeuchi

    Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestshorse culture of Japan.

  • Elizabeth Tallent

    Elizabeth Tallent

    Bella Mabury and Eloise Mabury Knapp Professor of Humanities
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 03/31/2022

    BioElizabeth Tallent previously taught literature and creative writing at the University of California at Irvine, the Iowa Writers Workshop, and at the University of California, Davis. She is the author of a novel, Museum Pieces, and three collections of short stories, In Constant Flight, Time with Children, and Honey, and a study of John Updike's fiction, Married Men and Magic Tricks. Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, Harper's, Grand Street, The Paris Review, and The Threepenny Review, and in The Best American Short Stories and O. Henry Award collections. Her story "Tabriz" received 2008 Pushcart Prize Award. In 2007 she was awarded Stanford's Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Award, and in 2008 she received the Northern California Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa's Excellence in Teaching Award, recognizing "the extraordinary gifts, diligence, and amplitude of spirit that mark the best in teaching." In 2009 she was honored with Stanford's Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching." Her short story "Never Come Back" appeared in the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories 2011.

  • Elaine Treharne

    Elaine Treharne

    Roberta Bowman Denning Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of German Studies and of Comparative Literature

    BioMy main research interests are in early medieval literature, the long history of information technologies, the handmade book, and cultural landscapes. I have published widely on medieval manuscripts--their materiality, contents and contexts of production and reception. Among various books and articles are the Very Short Introduction to Medieval Literature (OUP, 2015), Living Through Conquest: The Politics of Early English, 1020 to 1220 (OUP, 2012), Old and Middle English, c. 890-1450: An Anthology, 3rd ed. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), The Old English Life of St Nicholas (Leeds, 1997), Textual Distortion (Woodbridge, 2017 with Greg Walker). I was Principal Investigator of the AHRC-funded research project and ebook, 'The Production and Use of English Manuscripts, 1060 to 1220' (http://www.le.ac.uk/ee/em1060to1220/), which ran from 2005 to 2010; Principal Investigator of Stanford Global Currents, funded by the NEH, 2014-2016 (https://globalcurrents.stanford.edu/); and Principal Investigator of CyberText, funded by the CyberInitiative (2016-2018, https://texttechnologies.stanford.edu/research/cybertext-technologies). Each of these funded projects focuses on the uses of computational and digital tools to investigate the history of book production.

    My current projects focus the History of Text Technologies from the earliest times (c. 70,000BCE) to the present day. I have just published Text Technologies: A History (with Claude Willan, Stanford University Press, 2019), which form the first of probably two volumes on this topic. I also co-edit the Stanford University Press Text Technologies Series. I research the hapticity and phenomenology of the handwritten book, and will be publishing The Phenomenal Book based on this work in 2020. This research also extends to a more modern period of the medieval, and to the work of artists, including William Morris, Edward Johnston, Eric Gill and David Jones. This work will appear as Beauty and the Book: Arts and Crafts to Modernism eventually. I am working on Salisbury's Manuscripts for the Anglo-Saxon Manuscripts in Microfiche Facsimile series. My major research networks involve colleagues at the Universities of Cambridge, Glasgow, Oxford, London, and the University of British Columbia, among others. Stanford Text Technologies collaborates widely with an international group of scholars, both on manuscripts from Western culture, but also manuscripts and inscribed objects from cultures around the world. Finally, a major new project will be called Landscapes of Immortality, and this will seek to incorporate landscape studies, layers of cultural activity, and concepts of immortality. This will form a short book to be published perhaps in 2021.

    Professionally, I am keen advocate and critic of the use of digital technologies in the classroom and in research; and I am concerned about the ways in which we display textual objects and employ interpretative tools and frameworks online. With colleagues here and at Cambridge, we developed online teaching materials for Medieval Manuscript Studies, in a sequence called 'Digging Deeper'. I have been the Ida Beam Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Iowa, an American Philosophical Society Franklin Fellow, a Princeton Procter Fellow, and I'm a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, of the Royal Historical Society, and the English Association (and its former Chair and President). I serve as Editor for the OUP Oxford Bibliographies Online British and Irish Literature initiative, and I am General Editor of the OUP Oxford Textual Perspectives Series.

  • Jennifer Trimble

    Jennifer Trimble

    Associate Professor of Classics

    BioJennifer Trimble works on the visual and material culture of the Roman Empire, with interests in portraits and replication, the visual culture of Roman slavery, comparative urbanism, and ancient mapping. Her book on Women and Visual Replication in Roman Imperial Art and Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2011) explores the role of visual sameness in constructing public identity and articulating empire and place. Trimble was co-director of the IRC-Oxford-Stanford excavations in the Roman Forum (now being prepared for publication), focused on the interactions of commercial, religious and monumental space. She also co-directed Stanford's Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project, a collaboration between computer scientists and archaeologists to help reassemble a fragmentary ancient map of the city of Rome.

  • Nancy de Wit

    Nancy de Wit

    Victoria and Roger Sant Professor of Art

    BioNancy J. Troy is Victoria and Roger Sant Professor in Art and Chair of the Art & Art History Department at Stanford University. In addition to The De Stijl Environment (MIT Press, 1983), she is the author of Modernism and the Decorative Arts in France: Art Nouveau to Le Corbusier (Yale University Press, 1991), Couture Culture: A Study in Modern Art and Fashion(MIT Press, 2003), and, most recently, The Afterlife of Piet Mondrian(University of Chicago Press, 2013). In this book about Mondrian after his death in 1944, Troy examines the trajectories of the artist's work and legacy as they circulated through the realms of elite and popular culture, and she explores the ways in which the dominant historical narrative of Mondrian and his work has been shaped by art-market forces.

    Professor Troy received her PhD from Yale University in 1979, and thereafter taught at The Johns Hopkins University (1979-83), Northwestern University (1983-93), and the University of Southern California (1994-2010). A past president of the National Committee for the History of Art, she was Editor-in-Chief of the flagship art history journal, The Art Bulletin, from 1994 to 1997. She has been awarded many fellowships, most notably from the Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Getty Research Institute, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts.

    At Stanford, Professor Troy teaches courses on modern European and American art, architecture and design; cubism; modern art and fashion; art, business and the law; the art market, and topics generated by the collections and exhibitions of the Cantor Arts Center and the Art and Architecture Library.

  • Frederick Turner

    Frederick Turner

    Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Art and Art History and of History

    BioFred Turner’s research and teaching focus on media technology and cultural change. He is especially interested in the ways that emerging media have helped shape American life since World War II.

    Turner is the author of three books: The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties; From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. His essays have tackled topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries. They are available here: fredturner.stanford.edu/essays/.

    Turner’s research has received a number of academic awards and has been featured in publications ranging from Science and the New York Times to Ten Zen Monkeys. It has also been translated into French, Spanish, German, Polish and Chinese.

    Turner is also the Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine, the Boston Phoenix, and the Pacific News Service.

    Turner earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.