School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-9 of 9 Results

  • Guadalupe Valdes

    Guadalupe Valdes

    Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor of Education, Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFounding partner of Understanding Language, an initiative that focuses attention on the role of language in subject-area learning, with a special focus on helping English Language Learners meet the new Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards.

  • Juan Rafael Valdez

    Juan Rafael Valdez

    Lecturer

    BioJuan R. Valdez teaches all levels of Spanish and is also a scholar. Until recently his research has focused on the politics of language, paying special attention to the interplay of language and race in the construction of identity and struggles for power in the Hispanic Caribbean and the US. His book, Tracing Dominican identity: the writings of Pedro Henríquez Ureña (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), was also edited in Spanish and published in Argentina by Ediciones Katatay as En busca de la identidad: la obra de Pedro Henríquez Ureña (2015). He has taught seminars as a Visiting Scholar in Germany and Cuba. He enjoys teaching very much and has taught Spanish, Hispanic sociolinguistics, educational and cultural linguistics from a critical perspective throughout the US. He’s currently working on a book of essays that explore the intersection of politics, race, and mental health. He also enjoys collaborating with scholars, artists, and activists across different interdisciplinary fields and across the globe.

  • Blakey Vermeule

    Blakey Vermeule

    Albert Guérard Professor of Literature
    On Leave from 09/01/2021 To 08/31/2022

    BioBlakey Vermeule's research interests are neuroaesthetics, cognitive and evolutionary approaches to art, philosophy and literature, British literature from 1660-1820, post-Colonial fiction, satire, and the history of the novel. She is the author of The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain (2000) and Why Do We Care About Literary Characters? (2009), both from The Johns Hopkins University Press. She is writing a book about what mind science has discovered about the unconscious.

  • Richard Vinograd

    Richard Vinograd

    Christensen Professor of Asian Art

    BioRichard Vinograd is the Christensen Fund Professor in Asian Art in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1989. Dr. Vinograd’s research interests include Chinese portraiture, landscape painting and cultural geography, urban cultural spaces, painting aesthetics and theory, art historiography, and inter-media studies. He is the author of Boundaries of the Self: Chinese Portraits, 1600-1900 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992); co-editor of New Understandings of Ming and Qing Painting (Shanghai: Shanghai Calligraphy Painting Publishing House, 1994); and co-author of Chinese Art & Culture (New York: Prentice Hall and Harry N. Abrams, 2001). He has published more than thirty journal articles, anthology chapters, conference papers, and catalogue essays on topics ranging from tenth-century landscape painting to contemporary transnational arts.

  • Peter Vitousek

    Peter Vitousek

    Clifford G. Morrison Professor of Population and Resource Studies, Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment and Professor, by courtesy, of Earth System Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVitousek's research interests include: evaluating the global cycles of nitrogen and phosphorus, and how they are altered by human activity; understanding how the interaction of land and culture contributed to the sustainability of Hawaiian (and other Pacific) agriculture and society before European contact; and working to make fertilizer applications more efficient and less environmentally damaging (especially in rapidly growing economies)

  • Barbara Voss

    Barbara Voss

    Professor of Anthropology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a historical archaeologist who studies the dynamics and outcomes of transnational cultural encounters: How did diverse groups of people, who previously had little knowledge of each other, navigate the challenges and opportunities of abrupt and sustained interactions caused by colonialism, conflict, and migration? I approach this question through fine-grained, site-specific investigations coupled with broad-scale comparative and collaborative research programs.