School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 27 Results

  • Trent Walker

    Trent Walker

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Religious Studies

    BioPhD, University of California, Berkeley, 2018
    BA, Stanford University, 2010

    Trent Walker specializes in Southeast Asian Buddhism, including ritual, manuscript, and translation cultures in Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Recent publications include articles on Cambodian Dharma songs, Thai literary history, and translation practices in southern Vietnam. He is working on his first book, Classical Reading, Vernacular Writing: A Bitextual History of Mainland Southeast Asian Letters, 1450–1850, which argues that a distinct mode of translation was the core intellectual and literary activity in early modern Theravada Buddhist cultures.

  • Jamele Christa Watkins

    Jamele Christa Watkins

    Postdoctoral Scholar, German Studies

    BioJamele Watkins researches and teaches on issues of race and gender in contemporary German performance, film, and literature (broadly speaking). She is currently working on a book project that focuses on Black internationalism and the solidarity campaigns for Angela Davis in the GDR. She completed her doctoral studies in German at UMass Amherst with the completion of dissertation, “The Drama of Race.” She has also studied at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, and Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg.

  • Brendan Joseph McKinney Weaver

    Brendan Joseph McKinney Weaver

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Archaeology

    BioI am an archaeologist and historical anthropologist focusing on labor, slavery, and the African diaspora of the Andes. I earned my Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in 2015. Prior to coming to the Stanford Archaeology Center as a Postdoc in the fall of 2018, I was the Mellon Institute Visiting Assistant Professor of History and Anthropology at Berea College (Kentucky, 2016-2018), and a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Collaborative Research in the Humanities, Queen’s University Belfast (Northern Ireland, 2015-2016).

    My current research explores through material culture the daily lived experience of agroindustrial workers and residents, the vast majority of whom were both enslaved and of Sub-Saharan African origin, on wine and brandy producing estates owned by the Society of Jesus on the Peruvian coast in the 17th and 18th centuries. I direct the Haciendas of Nasca Archaeological Project (PAHN), centered on Nasca’s Ingenio Valley, which is the first to archaeologically study the African diaspora in what is today the Republic of Peru. By following daily praxis in both productive and domestic contexts, my research asserts that enslaved Afro-Andean laborers engaged with the oppressive structures of hacienda life, but developed strategies and found discreet and material ways of self-expression in response to hegemonic structures.