School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Paras Arora

    Paras Arora

    Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, admitted Autumn 2021

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSocio-Cultural Anthropology, Medical Anthropology, Psychological Anthropology, Ethnography, Care, Cognitive Disability, Autism, Gender, Family, Kinship, Ethics, Occupational Therapy, Neurodiversity, Voice, Intuition, Emotions, Everyday Life, & South Asia

  • Andrew Bauer

    Andrew Bauer

    Associate Professor of Anthropology

    BioAndrew Bauer is an anthropological archaeologist whose research and teaching interests broadly focus on the archaeology of human-environment relations, including the socio-politics of land use and both symbolic and material aspects of producing spaces, places, and landscapes. Andrew's primary research is based in South India, where he co-directs fieldwork investigating the relationships between landscape history, cultural practices, and institutionalized forms of social inequalities and difference during the region’s Neolithic, Iron Age, Early Historic, and Medieval periods. As an extension of his archaeological work he is also interested in the intersections of landscape histories and modern framings of nature that relate to conservation politics and climate change.

  • Emily Bishop

    Emily Bishop

    Director of Finance & Operations, Anthropology, Anthropology

    BioEmily is the Program Manager for the Archaeology Center. Prior to joining the Archaeology Center, she worked in the Department of Anthropology as their computer resource specialist and financial analyst. Emily has a Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration from the University of British Columbia and worked in the high tech industry for over 10 years before coming to Stanford.

  • Miray Cakiroglu

    Miray Cakiroglu

    Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, admitted Autumn 2018

    BioMy research revolves around the constitutive role of ruins, as a specific genre of objects, in the spatial organization of politics at multiple scales and in a historical continuum. As the constructed cultural progenitor of western Europe, the Mediterranean region occupies a special place in discussions of heritage with its extensive ruin landscapes. The search for the material remains of antiquity motivated much of travel eastward, shaping the archaeological imaginary in the discipline’s early days. I focus on the shifting trajectory of the meaning of ruins as they move from one context to another. I am specifically interested in the imperial encounters of the 19th century on what is now the Turkish Aegean and the afterlives of ruins in new sociopolitical frameworks. I am also interested in the territorial imagination of homelands and borderlands in relation to politics of death, dying, and martyrdom.

    I received my B.A. in English Literature with a double major in Philosophy from Bogazici University. I completed an M.A. in Cultural Studies at the same university with a thesis on the formulation of urban space and urban citizen in the coursebooks of “Istanbul courses.” I hold another M.A. in Near Eastern Studies from New York University, where I focused on the mobility of a Seljuk sultan’s tomb in Syria, presently a Turkish territory outside national borders, in its relation to nationalism and place-making. I have two poetry books published in Turkish, one of which is the recipient of the prestigious Yasar Nabi Nayir Youth Award.

  • Hector Miguel Callejas

    Hector Miguel Callejas

    Lecturer

    BioDr. Hector M. Callejas is an IDEAL Provostial Fellow and Lecturer in the Department of Anthropology at Stanford University. He researches and teaches on political anthropology; Latin American and Latinx studies; Native American and Indigenous studies; comparative ethnic studies; cultural studies; critical theory; and the Americas. His research investigates how the politics of race, ethnicity, and Indigeneity in contemporary society intersect with colonialism, capitalism, nation, the state, and governance. He focuses on social movements. His current project analyzes dispossession, human rights, and cultural heritage in Latin America. His next project will explore sovereignty, migration, and the environment in the United States. He uncovers how, why, and to what effects marginalized peoples become the subjects of political discourses in their everyday lives.