School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-20 of 40 Results

  • Asad L. Asad

    Asad L. Asad

    Assistant Professor of Sociology

    BioAsad L. Asad is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. His scholarly interests encompass social stratification; race, ethnicity, and immigration; surveillance and social control; and health. Asad's current research agenda considers how institutions—particularly U.S. immigration law and policy—reproduce multiple forms of inequality.

  • Angele Christin

    Angele Christin

    Associate Professor of Communication and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAngèle Christin studies how algorithms and analytics transform professional values, expertise, and work practices.

    Her book, Metrics at Work: Journalism and the Contested Meaning of Algorithms (Princeton University Press, 2020) focuses on the case of web journalism, analyzing the growing importance of audience data in web newsrooms in the U.S. and France. Drawing on ethnographic methods, Angèle shows how American and French journalists make sense of traffic numbers in different ways, which in turn has distinct effects on the production of news in the two countries. She discussed it on the New Books Network podcast.

    In a related study, she analyzed the construction, institutionalization, and reception of predictive algorithms in the U.S. criminal justice system, building on her previous work on the determinants of criminal sentencing in French courts.

    Her new project examines the paradoxes of algorithmic labor through a study of influencers and influencer marketing on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

  • Matthew Clair

    Matthew Clair

    Assistant Professor of Sociology and, by courtesy, of Law

    BioMatthew Clair is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and (by courtesy) the Law School. His research interests include law and society, race and ethnicity, cultural sociology, criminal justice, and qualitative methods. He is the author of the book Privilege and Punishment: How Race and Class Matter in Criminal Court.

    Learn more at his personal website: https://www.matthewclair.org/

  • Larry Diamond

    Larry Diamond

    Mosbacher Senior Fellow of Global Democracy at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and Professor, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly Interestsdemocratic development and regime change; U.S. foreign policy affecting democracy abroad; comparative trends in the quality and stability of democracy in developing countries and postcommunist states; and public opinion in new democracies, especially in East Asia

  • Benjamin Domingue

    Benjamin Domingue

    Associate Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI'm interested in models for psychological measurement and their uses alongside applied statistical projects of all kinds.

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    Joan B. Ford Professor

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.

  • David Grusky

    David Grusky

    Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDavid B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010).

  • Jackelyn Hwang

    Jackelyn Hwang

    Assistant Professor of Sociology

    BioJackelyn Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Urban Studies Program. Jackelyn’s main research interests are in the fields of urban sociology, race and ethnicity, immigration, and inequality. In particular, her research examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities. Her current projects focus on the causes and consequences of gentrification and developing automated methods for measuring neighborhood change using Google Street View imagery.

    Jackelyn received her B.A.S. in Sociology and Mathematics from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University. After completing her Ph.D., she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. Her research has been supported by the American Sociological Association, the Joint Center for Housing Studies, the National Science Foundation, among others. Her work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Demography, Social Forces, and other academic journals.

  • Tomas Jimenez

    Tomas Jimenez

    Professor of Sociology

    BioTomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

    He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

    Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • Michael Kahan

    Michael Kahan

    Senior Lecturer of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests19th and 20th Century Urban and Social History; Street Life; Urban Space

  • Douglas McAdam

    Douglas McAdam

    Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor, Emeritus

    BioDoug McAdam is The Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology at Stanford University and the former Director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. He is the author or co-author of 18 books and some 85 other publications in the area of political sociology, with a special emphasis on race in the U.S., American politics, and the study of social movements and “contentious politics.” Among his best known works are Political Process and the Development of Black Insurgency, 1930-1970, a new edition of which was published in 1999 (University of Chicago Press), Freedom Summer (1988, Oxford University Press), which was awarded the 1990 C. Wright Mills Award as well as being a finalist for the American Sociological Association’s best book prize for 1991 and Dynamics of Contention (2001, Cambridge University Press) with Sid Tarrow and Charles Tilly. He is also the author of the 2012 book, A Theory of Fields (Oxford University Press), with Neil Fligstein and a book due out this summer on the historical origins of the deep political and economic divisions that characterize the contemporary U.S. The book, from Oxford University Press, is entitled: The Origins of Our Fractured Society: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Post-War America (with Karina Kloos). He was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2003.

  • Daniel McFarland

    Daniel McFarland

    Professor of Education and, by courtesy, of Sociology and of Organizational Behavior at the Graduate School of Business

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe majority of my current research projects concern the sociology of science and research innovation. Here are some examples of projects we are pursuing:
    1. the process of intellectual jurisdiction across fields and disciplines
    2. the process of knowledge innovation diffusion in science
    3. the propagators of scientific careers and advance
    4. the role of identity and diversity on the process of knowledge diffusion and career advance
    5. the process of research translation across scientific fields and into practice
    6. the formal properties and mechanisms of ideational change (network analysis, or holistic conceptions of scientific propositions and ideas)
    7. developing methods for identifying the rediscovery of old ideas recast anew
    8. investigating the process of scientific review

    I am also heavily involved in research on social networks and social network theory development. Some of my work concerns relational dynamics and cognitive networks as represented in communication. This often concerns the communication of children (in their writings and speech in classrooms) and academic scholars. I am also co-editing a special issue in Social Networks on "network ecology", and I am a coauthor on a social network methods textbook coming out with Cambridge Press (Forthcoming, by Craig Rawlings, Jeff Smith, James Moody and Daniel McFarland).

    Last, I am heavily involved in institutional efforts to develop computational social science, computational sociology, and education data science on Stanford's campus.