School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 1-10 of 152 Results

  • David Donoho

    David Donoho

    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioDavid Donoho is a mathematician who has made fundamental contributions to theoretical and computational statistics, as well as to signal processing and harmonic analysis. His algorithms have contributed significantly to our understanding of the maximum entropy principle, of the structure of robust procedures, and of sparse data description.

    Research Statement:
    My theoretical research interests have focused on the mathematics of statistical inference and on theoretical questions arising in applying harmonic analysis to various applied problems. My applied research interests have ranged from data visualization to various problems in scientific signal processing, image processing, and inverse problems.

  • Scott Dixon

    Scott Dixon

    Assistant Professor of Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is interested in the relationship between cell death and metabolism. Using techniques drawn from many disciplines my laboratory is investigating how perturbation of intracellular metabolic networks can result in novel forms of cell death, such as ferroptosis. We are interested in applying this knowledge to find new ways to treat diseases characterized by insufficient (e.g. cancer) or excessive (e.g. neurodegeneration) cell death.

  • Mark Duggan

    Mark Duggan

    The Trione Director of SIEPR, The Wayne and Jodi Cooperman Professor and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioMark Duggan is a Professor of Economics at Stanford University and a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering at M.I.T. in 1992 and 1994, respectively, and his Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University in 1999. He currently is a Co-Editor at the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy and was previously a Co-Editor at the Journal of Public Economics. Before arriving to Stanford in the summer of 2014, Duggan served on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School (2011-14), the University of Maryland's Economics Department (2003-11), and the University of Chicago's Economics Department (1999-2003).

    Professor Duggan's research focuses primarily on the effect of government expenditure programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid on the behavior of individuals and firms. Some of his more recent research is exploring the effect of federal disability programs on the labor market and of changes to the Medicare and Medicaid programs on the cost and quality of health care. He is also estimating the effect of patent reforms in India on the price and utilization of pharmaceutical treatments. His research has been published in leading academic journals including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics and has been featured in outlets such as The Economist, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

    Professor Duggan was the 2010 recipient of the ASHEcon Medal, which is awarded every two years by the American Society of Health Economists to the economist aged 40 and under in the U.S. who has made the most significant contributions to the field of health economics. Along with his co-author Fiona Scott Morton, he received the National Institute for Health Care Management's 2011 Health Care Research Award for their work on Medicare Part D. He was a Fellow of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation from 2004 to 2006 and a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution from 2006 to 2007. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Social Security Administration, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Duggan served from 2009 to 2010 as the Senior Economist for Health Care Policy at the White House Council of Economic Advisers and has also been an Expert Witness for the U.S. Department of Justice.