School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 21-40 of 69 Results

  • Morris P. Fiorina

    Morris P. Fiorina

    Wendt Family Professor and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioMorris P. Fiorina is the Wendt Family Professor of Political Science and a Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution. He received an undergraduate degree from Allegheny College and a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester, and taught at Caltech and Harvard before joining Stanford in 1998. Fiorina has written widely on American politics, with special emphasis on the study of representation, public opinion and elections. He has published numerous articles and written or edited thirteen books, including: Representatives, Roll Calls, and Constituencies; Congress--Keystone of the Washington Establishment; Retrospective Voting in American National Elections; The Personal Vote (coauthored with Bruce Cain and John Ferejohn); Divided Government; Civic Engagement in American Democracy (co-edited with Theda Skocpol), Culture War? The Myth of a Polarized America (with Samuel Abrams and Jeremy Pope), Disconnect: The Breakdown of Representation in American Politics (with Samuel Abrams), Can We Talk: The Rise of Rude, Nasty, Stubborn Politics (co-edited with Dan Shea) and most recently, Unstable Majorities. Fiorina has served on the editorial boards of a dozen journals in Political Science, Political Economy, Law, and Public Policy, and from 1986-1990 served as Chairman of the Board of Overseers of the American National Election Studies. He is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. He has received Career Achievement Awards from the American Political Science Association’s Organized Sections on Elections, Public Opinion, and Voting Behavior, and Political Organizations and Parties.

  • James Fishkin

    James Fishkin

    Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    BioJames S. Fishkin holds the Janet M. Peck Chair in International Communication at Stanford University where he is Professor of Communication, Professor of Political Science (by courtesy) and Director of the Deliberative Democracy Lab.

    He received his B.A. from Yale in 1970 and holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Yale as well as a second Ph.D. in Philosophy from Cambridge.

    He is the author of Democracy When the People Are Thinking (Oxford 2018), When the People Speak (Oxford 2009), Deliberation Day (Yale 2004 with Bruce Ackerman) and Democracy and Deliberation (Yale 1991).

    He is best known for developing Deliberative Polling® – a practice of public consultation that employs random samples of the citizenry to explore how opinions would change if they were more informed. His work on deliberative democracy has stimulated more than 100 Deliberative Polls in 28 countries around the world. It has been used to help governments and policy makers make important decisions in Texas, China, Mongolia, Japan, Macau, South Korea, Bulgaria, Brazil, Uganda and other countries around the world.

    He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Guggenheim Fellow, a Fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford, and a Visiting Fellow Commoner at Trinity College, Cambridge.

  • Vasiliki Fouka

    Vasiliki Fouka

    Associate Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioVasiliki Fouka is Associate Professor of Political Science. Her research interests include historical political economy, political behavior and cultural economics. She studies intergroup relations and the dynamics of identity change in a variety of temporal and geographic contexts.

  • Francis Fukuyama

    Francis Fukuyama

    Olivier & Nomellini Senior Fellow in International Studies at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDeveloping nations; governance; international political economy; nation-building and democratization; strategic and security issues

  • Judith L. Goldstein

    Judith L. Goldstein

    Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication, Professor of Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioJudith L. Goldstein is the Janet M. Peck Professor of International Communication and the Kaye University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Her research focuses on international political economy, with a focus on trade politics. She has written and/or edited six book including Ideas, Interests and American Trade Policy and more recently The Evolution of the Trade Regime: Politics, Law and Economics of the GATT and the WTO. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals.

    Her current research focuses on the political requisites for trade liberalization focusing both on tariff bargaining and public preferences. As well, she is engaged in the analysis of a large survey panel, which focuses on how economic hard times influences public opinion.

    Goldstein has a BA from the University of California Berkeley, a Masters degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from UCLA.

  • Justin Ryan Grimmer

    Justin Ryan Grimmer

    Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor of Public Policy and Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution

    BioJustin Grimmer is the Morris M. Doyle Centennial Professor in Public Policy in Stanford University's Department of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and Co-Director of the Democracy and Polarization Lab. His research focuses on Congress, elections, social media, and data science.

  • Anna Grzymala-Busse

    Anna Grzymala-Busse

    Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor of International Studies and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and, by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioAnna Grzymala-Busse is the Michelle and Kevin Douglas Professor of International Studies in the Department of Political Science, the Director of the Europe Center, and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute. Her research focuses on the historical development of the state and its transformation, political parties, religion and politics, and post-communist politics. Other areas of interest include populism, informal institutions, and causal mechanisms.

    She is the author of three books: Redeeming the Communist Past: The Regeneration of Communist Successor Parties; Rebuilding Leviathan: Party Competition and State Development in Post-Communist Europe; Nations Under God: How Churches Use Moral Authority to Influence Politics and Sacred Foundations: the Religious and Medieval Roots of the European State. She is also a recipient of the Carnegie and Guggenheim Fellowships.

  • Stephen Haber

    Stephen Haber

    A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution and at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Economics

    BioStephen Haber is the A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, the Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. In addition, he is a professor of political science, professor of history, and professor of economics (by courtesy).

    Haber has spent his career investigating why the world distribution of income so uneven. His papers have been published in economics, history, political science, and law journals.
    He is the author of five books and the editor of six more. Haber’s most recent books include Fragile by Design with Charles Calomiris (Princeton University Press), which examines how governments and industry incumbents often craft banking regulatory policies in ways that stifle competition and increase systemic risk. The Battle Over Patents (Oxford University Press), a volume edited with Naomi Lamoreaux, documents the development of US-style patent systems and the political fights that have shaped them.

    His latest project focuses on a long-standing puzzle in the social sciences: why are prosperous democracies not randomly distributed across the planet, but rather, are geographically clustered? Haber and his coauthors answer this question by using geospatial tools to simulate the ecological conditions that shaped pre-industrial food production and trade. They then employ machine learning methods to elucidate the relationship between ecological conditions and the levels of economic development that emerged across the globe over the past three centuries.

    Haber holds a Ph.D. in history from UCLA and has been on the Stanford faculty since 1987.
    From 1995 to 1998, he served as associate dean for the social sciences and director of Graduate Studies of Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences. He is among Stanford’s most distinguished teachers, having been awarded every teaching prize Stanford has to offer.

  • Jens Hainmueller

    Jens Hainmueller

    Kimberly Glenn Professor and Professor of Political Science

    BioJens Hainmueller is the Kimberly Glenn Professor in Political Science and Director of Graduate Studies of the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is the Faculty Co-Director of the Stanford Immigration Policy Lab that is focused on the design and evaluation of immigration and integration policies and programs.

    His research interests include statistical methods, causal inference, immigration, and political economy. He has published over 65 articles, many of them in top general science journals (e.g. Science, Nature, PNAS) and top field journals in political science, statistics, economics, and business. His statistical methods are used by organizations to conduct causal inferences in various settings. He has also published multiple open source software packages. His research has received funding from organizations such as Schmidt Futures, the Robin Hood Foundation, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Health, and the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research has won various awards including the Gosnell Prize for Excellence in Political Methodology, the Warren Miller Prize, the Robert H. Durr award, and the Emerging Scholar award by the Society of Political Methodology. He was selected as an Andrew Carnegie Fellow and inducted as a Fellow of the Society of Political Methodology. He has received an honorary degree from the European University Institute (EUI).

    Hainmueller received his PhD from Harvard University and also studied at the London School of Economics, Brown University, and the University of Tübingen. Before joining Stanford, he served on the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Andrew Hall

    Andrew Hall

    Davies Family Professor, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, and by courtesy, at the Hoover Institution

    BioAndrew Hall is a Professor of Political Economy at the Graduate School of Business and a Professor of Political Science. He is the co-director of the Democracy & Polarization Lab and a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. Hall combines large-scale quantitative datasets with tools from economics, statistics, and machine learning to understand how to design democratic systems of governance, with a focus on American elections and legislatures as well as the governance of online communities.

  • Daniel Ho

    Daniel Ho

    William Benjamin Scott & Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, at the Stanford Institute for HAI and Professor, by courtesy, of Computer Science

    BioDaniel E. Ho is the William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, Professor of Political Science, Professor of Computer Science (by courtesy), Senior Fellow at Stanford's Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence, and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. He is a Faculty Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and is Director of the Regulation, Evaluation, and Governance Lab (RegLab). Ho serves on the National Artificial Intelligence Advisory Commission (NAIAC), advising the White House on artificial intelligence, as Senior Advisor on Responsible AI at the U.S. Department of Labor, and as a Public Member of the Administrative Conference of the United States (ACUS). He received his J.D. from Yale Law School and Ph.D. from Harvard University and clerked for Judge Stephen F. Williams on the U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit.

  • Shanto Iyengar

    Shanto Iyengar

    William Robertson Coe Professor and Professor of Political Science and of Communication

    BioShanto Iyengar is a Professor of Political Science and Director of the Political Communication Laboratory. Iyengar’s areas of expertise include the role of mass media in democratic societies, public opinion, and political psychology. Iyengar’s research has been supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Ford Foundation, the Pew Charitable Trusts, and the Hewlett Foundation. He is the recipient of several professional awards including the Philip Converse Award of the American Political Science Association for the best book in the field of public opinion, the Murray Edelman Lifetime Achievement Award, and the Goldsmith Book Prize from Harvard University. Iyengar is author or co-author of several books, including News That Matters (University of Chicago Press, 1987), Is Anyone Responsible? (University of Chicago Press, 1991), Explorations in Political Psychology (Duke University Press, 1995), Going Negative (Free Press, 1995), and Media Politics: A Citizen’s Guide (Norton, 2011).

  • Hakeem Jefferson

    Hakeem Jefferson

    Assistant Professor of Political Science

    BioI am an assistant professor of political science at Stanford University where I am also a faculty affiliate with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Stanford Center for American Democracy. I received my PhD in political science from the University of Michigan and a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and African American Studies from the University of South Carolina.

    My research focuses primarily on the role identity plays in structuring political attitudes and behaviors in the U.S. I am especially interested in understanding how stigma shapes the politics of Black Americans, particularly as it relates to group members’ support for racialized punitive social policies. In other research projects, I examine the psychological and social roots of the racial divide in Americans’ reactions to officer-involved shootings and work to evaluate the meaningfulness of key political concepts, like ideological identification, among Black Americans.

    My dissertation, "Policing Norms: Punishment and the Politics of Respectability Among Black Americans," was a co-winner of the 2020 Best Dissertation Award from the Political Psychology Section of the American Political Science Association.

  • Saumitra Jha

    Saumitra Jha

    Associate Professor of Political Economy at the GSB, Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute, at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research & Associate Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science and of Economics

    BioSaumitra Jha is an Associate Professor of Political Economy at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business, and by courtesy, of Economics and of Political Science. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law in the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Affairs and convenes the Stanford Conflict and Polarization Lab.

    Saumitra holds a BA from Williams College, master’s degrees in economics and mathematics from the University of Cambridge, and a PhD in economics from Stanford University. Prior to joining the GSB, he was an Academy Scholar at Harvard University. He has been a Center Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, as well as of the Niehaus Center for Globalization and Governance and the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton University. He was voted Teacher of the Year by the students of the Stanford GSB Sloan Fellow Class of 2020. He received the Michael Wallerstein Award for best published article in Political Economy from the American Political Science Association in 2014 for his research on ethnic tolerance and his co-authored work on Heroes was awarded the 2020 Oliver Williamson Best Paper Award from the Society for Institutional and Organizational Economics.

  • Colin Kahl

    Colin Kahl

    Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies and Professor, by courtesy, of Political Science

    BioColin H. Kahl is co-director of the Center for International Security and Cooperation, the inaugural Steven C. Házy Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a Professor, by courtesy, in the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Strategic Consultant to the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement.

    From October 2014 to January 2017, he was Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to the Vice President. In that position, he served as a senior advisor to President Obama and Vice President Biden on all matters related to U.S. foreign policy and national security affairs, and represented the Office of the Vice President as a standing member of the National Security Council Deputies’ Committee. From February 2009 to December 2011, Dr. Kahl was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East at the Pentagon. In this capacity, he served as the senior policy advisor to the Secretary of Defense for Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Yemen, and six other countries in the Levant and Persian Gulf region. In June 2011, he was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Outstanding Public Service by Secretary Robert Gates.

    From 2007 to 2017 (when not serving in the U.S. government), Dr. Kahl was an assistant and associate professor in the Security Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. From 2007 to 2009 and 2012 to 2014, he was also a Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security (CNAS), a nonpartisan Washington, DC-based think tank. From 2000 to 2007, he was an assistant professor of political science at the University of Minnesota. In 2005-2006, Dr. Kahl took leave from the University of Minnesota to serve as a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, where he worked on issues related to counterinsurgency, counterterrorism, and responses to failed states. In 1997-1998, he was a National Security Fellow at the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University.

    Current research includes an assessment of American grand strategy in the Middle East in the post-9/11 era. A second research project focuses on the implications of emerging technologies on nuclear strategic stability.

    He has published numerous articles on international security and U.S. foreign and defense policy in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, International Security, the Los Angeles Times, Middle East Policy, the National Interest, the New Republic, the New York Times, Politico, the Washington Post, and the Washington Quarterly, as well as several reports for CNAS.

    His previous research analyzed the causes and consequences of violent civil and ethnic conflict in developing countries, focusing particular attention on the demographic and natural resource dimensions of these conflicts. His book on the subject, States, Scarcity, and Civil Strife in the Developing World, was published by Princeton University Press in 2006, and related articles and chapters have appeared in International Security, the Journal of International Affairs, and various edited volumes.

    Dr. Kahl received his B.A. in political science from the University of Michigan (1993) and his Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University (2000).

  • Terry Karl

    Terry Karl

    Gildred Professor in Latin American Studies, Emerita

    BioGildred Professor of Political Science and Latin American Studies (Emeritus)
    Bass All-University Fellow for Excellence in Teaching (Emeritus)
    International War Crimes and Human Rights Investigator

    Terry Lynn Karl earned her Ph.D. (with distinction) from Stanford University. After serving on the faculty in the Government Department of Harvard University, she joined Stanford University’s Department of Political Science in 1987. She served as director of the Center for Latin American Studies for twelve years when it was recognized by the U.S. Department of Education as a “center of excellence.” She currently works as a war crimes/human rights investigator/ expert witness for several judicial systems: the U.S. (Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security/War Crimes Division), Spain, El Salvador, Colombia, and elsewhere, and non-governmental organizations.

    An expert in international and comparative politics, Karl has conducted field research, held visiting appointments, or led workshops on oil politics and extractive resources, democratization and/or human rights throughout Latin America, West Africa, the Middle East, and Europe. She has published widely, with special emphasis on the politics of oil-exporting countries and conflict, transitions from authoritarian rule, problems of democratization, South American and Central America politics, the politics of inequality, U.S. foreign policy, and the resolution of civil wars. A multilingual scholar, her work has been translated into at least 25 languages.

    Honors for Research and Teaching: Karl was awarded the Latin American Studies Guillermo O’Donnell Prize in March 2023 for her work on democratization and human rights. She previously received a Doctor of Humane Letters, honoris causa, from the University of San Francisco and the Miriam Roland Volunteer Service Prize from Stanford University for her “exceptional commitment to public service in the cause of human rights and social justice.” The Latin American Studies Association awarded her the Oxfam Martin Diskin Prize in Toronto in 2010 for “excellence in combining scholarship and policy activism.” Karl has won all of Stanford’s major teaching awards offered during her tenure: the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Teaching (1989), the Stanford Medal for Faculty Excellence Fostering Undergraduate Research (1994), and the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Graduate and Undergraduate Teaching (1997), which is the University's highest academic prize. At Harvard, she was chosen as Radcliffe’s “mentor of the year.” She has been recognized for “exceptional teaching throughout her career,” resulting in her permanent appointment as a Stanford Bass All-University Fellow and the Gildred Chair in Latin American Studies. As an untenured professor in 1982, Karl is also known as the first woman to charge a major university with protecting sexual harassers and regain her career, resulting in an apology by Harvard’s President Bacow four decades later and a forthcoming Harvard honor.

    Recent Media: Karl has most recently appeared (2020-22) in the Washington Post, Forbes, Politico, Slate, New York Times, NBC, BBC, NPR, Newsweek, Fox News, USA Today, , the Guardian, El Faro, El Comercio, La Prensa Grafica, El Mundo, El Pais, El Nuevo Herald, Just Security, the Conversation, The Council of Foreign Relations, This Day Live, Analitica, El Impulso, Jewish News in Northern California, and the Chronicle of Higher Education on issues ranging from crimes against humanity to the politics of oil to combating sexual harassment.

  • Amanda Helen Kennard

    Amanda Helen Kennard

    Assistant Professor of Political Science and Center Fellow, by courtesy, at the Woods Institute for the Environment

    BioAmanda Kennard is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She studies the politics of climate change and global governance, employing game theory and a range of quantitative methods. She received her Ph.D. from the Department of Politics at Princeton University, an M.S. from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service, and a B.A. from New York University.

  • Jon Krosnick

    Jon Krosnick

    Frederic O. Glover Professor of Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication and of Political Science, at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and, by courtesy, of Psychology

    BioJon Krosnick is a social psychologist who does research on attitude formation, change, and effects, on the psychology of political behavior, and on survey research methods. He is the Frederic O. Glover Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, Professor of Communication, Political Science, and (by courtesy) Psychology. At Stanford, in addition to his professorships, he directs the Political Psychology Research Group and has directed the Summer Institute in Political Psychology.

    To read reports on Professor Krosnick’s research program exploring public opinion on the environment, visit the Public Opinion on Climate Change web site.

    Research Interests
    Author of seven published books and two forthcoming books and more than 190 articles and chapters, Dr. Krosnick conducts research in three primary areas: (1) attitude formation, change, and effects, (2) the psychology of political behavior, and (3) the optimal design of questionnaires used for laboratory experiments and surveys, and survey research methodology more generally.

    His attitude research has focused primarily on the notion of attitude strength, seeking to differentiate attitudes that are firmly crystallized and powerfully influential of thinking and action from attitudes that are flexible and inconsequential. Many of his studies in this area have focused on the amount of personal importance that an individual chooses to attach to an attitude. Dr. Krosnick’s studies have illuminated the origins of attitude importance (e.g., material self-interest and values) and the cognitive and behavioral consequences of importance in regulating attitude impact and attitude change processes.

    Honors
    Winner of the American Association for Public Opinion Research’s Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding research, and the Nevitt Sanford Award from the International Society of Political Psychology, Dr. Krosnick’s scholarship has been recognized by election as a fellow by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Erik Erikson Award for Excellence and Creativity in the Field of Political Psychology from the International Society of Political Psychology, two fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Phillip Brickman Memorial Prize for Research in Social Psychology, and the American Political Science Association’s Best Paper Award.