School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 51 Results

  • Cristobal Young

    Cristobal Young

    Assistant Professor of Sociology

    BioCristobal Young is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology. Cristobal works in the overlapping fields of economic sociology, stratification, and quantitative methods. He studies the sociological dynamics surrounding public policies that moderate income inequality. How do taxes affect the demographics of the elite? Do millionaire taxes cause migration of the elite to lower-tax climates? At the other end of the spectrum, does Unemployment Insurance, by moderating income loss during joblessness, weaken people’s desire to find new work? In other words, are there strong downside costs to intervening in the market distribution of income?

    Methodologically, Cristobal specializes in analyzing large scale administrative and survey data. Drawing on modern computational power, he is developing new methods for addressing model uncertainty and improving the robustness of social science research.

  • Ali Yaycioglu

    Ali Yaycioglu

    Assistant Professor of History

    BioMy main research interest is the Middle East and the Balkans under the Ottoman Empire. In my forthcoming book, Partners of the Empire: Notables, Communities and the Crisis of the Ottoman Order (1770-1820), which is a revised version of my dissertation, I analyze the rise of the provincial notables and different forms of collective actions in various parts of the Ottoman world and their challenge to the empire. I depict how the new provincial formations triggered institutional restructuring of the Ottoman order in the global age of revolutions. Currently, I am working on two different projects. The first one is on capital accumulation and imperial confiscations in the Ottoman Empire, roughly from 16th to the early 19th centuries. In this project, I focus on economic and social implications of imperial confiscations and examine how some individuals and families developed strategies to maintain their wealth and power and to escape from the constant threat of imperial seizure. I also analyze how this instability of property rights affected attitudes towards inheritance, life and mortality in Ottoman society. My other project is on the imaginations of the political spaces in Early Modern Eurasia. In this project, I am particularly interested in the interactions and competitions between territorial organizations of the early modern Eurasian empires, particularly the Ottoman Empire, and exterritorial imaginations and practices of the Islamic and Chingissid legacies.