School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 865 Results

  • R. Anderson

    R. Anderson

    Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities and Arts and J. E. Wallace Sterling Professor of the Humanities

    BioI was educated at Yale (A.B., 1987) and the University of Pennsylvania (M.A., Ph.D., 1993), where I worked closely with Alexander Nehamas, Paul Guyer, and Gary Hatfield. I have taught at Stanford since 1996, and was promoted to tenure here in 2004. I have also taught at Harvard University, Haverford College, Bryn Mawr College, and the University of Pennsylvania. I was born and raised in Macon, Georgia, and get back there as often as I can.

  • Arto Anttila

    Arto Anttila

    Associate Professor of Linguistics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPhonology, morphology, language variation

  • Jean-Marie Apostolides

    Jean-Marie Apostolides

    William H. Bonsall Professor of French and Professor of Theater and Performance Studies, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Apostolidès was educated in France, where he received a doctorate in literature and the social sciences. He taught psychology in Canada for seven years and sociology in France for three years. In 1980 he came to the United States, teaching at Harvard and then Stanford, primarily French Classical literature (the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries) and drama. He is interested in avant-garde artistic movements such as dada, surrealism, and situationist international; as well as the theory of image, literary theory, and Francophone literature. He is also a playwright, whose work has been staged in Paris, Montreal, and New York.

    His literary criticism focuses on the place of artistic production in the French classical age and in modern society. Whether it be the place of court pageantry during the reign of King Louis XIV (Le Roi-Machine, 1981), or the role of theater under the ancien régime (Le Prince Sacrificié, 1985), or even the importance of mass culture in the 1950s (Les Métamorphoses de Tintin, 1984), in each case Professor Apostolidès analyzes a specific cultural product both in its original context and in the context of the contemporary world. His most recent books are Les Tombeaux de Guy Debordin 1999, L'Audience in 2001, Traces, Revers, Ecarts in 2002, Sade in The Abyss in 2003, Héroïsme et victimisation in 2003,Hergé et le mythe du Surenfant in 2004. The tools required for such analysis are borrowed from literary criticism and from the social sciences, particularly psychoanalysis, anthropology, and sociology.

    In his books, Professor Apostolidès interprets the works of the past as witnesses of our intellectual and emotional life. His examination of the distant or near past seeks to make us more sensitive to the social changes that are taking place now, in order to improve our understanding of the direction in which contemporary society is moving.

  • Mark Applebaum

    Mark Applebaum

    Leland and Edith Smith Professor

    BioStudied with Brian Ferneyhough, Joji Yuasa, Rand Steiger; additional studies with Roger Reynolds, Phillip Rhodes, Mary Ellen Childs, Conlon Nancarrow.

    Selected commissions: Fromm Foundation, Merce Cunningham Dance Company, Vienna Modern Festival, Paul Dresher Ensemble, American Composers Forum, Betty Freeman, Zeitgeist, Meridian Arts Ensemble, MANUFACTURE (Tokyo), Belgium’s Champ D’Action, ADEvantgarde / Bayerische Theaterakademie (Munich), Electronic Music Midwest, Jerome Foundation, Harmida Trio.

    Recipient of the American Music Center’s Stephen Albert Award, Hincks Fellowship at Villa Montalvo Artist Colony, Jazz Society of Southern California Prize, 2005 2nd place emsPrize from Electronic Music Stockholm, Stanford’s 2003 Gores Award for Teaching Excellence.

    Performances include: Darmstadt New Music Courses, ICMC, Festival Spaziomusica, Young Nordic Music Festival, Sonic Circuits Hong Kong, SEAMUS, Southeastern Composers League, SIGGRAPH, the American Composers Orchestra’s OrchestraTech, Piano Spheres, Northwestern University New Music Marathon, the College Music Society, BONK Festival, Borges Festival in France, UNYAZI Festival South Aftrica, Time Canvas and TRANSIT Festivals in Belgium, the Essl Museum in Vienna, NIME at IRCAM in Paris, and the Kennedy Center.

    Papers include Experience Music Project’s Popular Music Studies conference, an article in New Music and Aesthetics in the 21st Century.

    Additional fields of interest include sound-sculpture design, jazz performance, collaborations with neural artists, animators, architects, florists, choreographers, laptop DJs. Recordings released on Innova, Tzadik, SEAMUS, & Capstone. Taught at Mississippi State University, Carleton College, and the University of California, San Diego.

  • Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Giancarlo Aquilanti

    Senior Lecturer in Music

    BioStudied composition with Paolo Ugoletti, Glenn Glasow, Wayne Peterson, and Jody Rockmaker.

    Numerous compositions, including songs for voice and various combinations of instruments, several orchestral, choral and band pieces, string quartets, and the operas La povertà, Lot’s Women, and Oxford Companions.

    Recipient of the Walter J. Gores award for excellence in teaching (2003-04), Stanford's highest award.