School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 11-20 of 46 Results

  • Sharad Goel

    Sharad Goel

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering and, by courtesy, of Computer Science, of Sociology and of Law

    BioSharad's primary area of research is computational social science, an emerging discipline at the intersection of computer science, statistics, and the social sciences. He's particularly interested in applying modern computational and statistical techniques to study social and political policies, such as stop-and-frisk, swing voting, filter bubbles, do-not-track, and media bias. Before joining Stanford, Sharad was a senior researcher at Microsoft Research and Yahoo Labs.

  • Mark Granovetter

    Mark Granovetter

    The Joan Butler Ford Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

    BioMark Granovetter's main interest is in the way people, social networks and social institutions interact and shape one another. He has written extensively on this subject, including his two most widely cited articles "The Strength of Weak Ties" (1973) and "Economic Action and Social Structure: The Problem of Embeddedness" (1985). In recent years, his focus has been on the social foundations of the economy, and he is working on a book entitled Society and Economy, to be published by Harvard University Press in two volumes. The first volume, Society and Economy: Framework and Principles,appeared in 2017. It is broadly theoretical, treating the role in the economy of social networks, norms, culture, trust, power, and social institutions. The second volume will use this framework to illuminate the study of such important topics as corruption, corporate governance, organizational form and the emergence of new industries such as the American electricity industry and the high-tech industry of Silicon Valley.

  • David Grusky

    David Grusky

    Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioDavid B. Grusky is Barbara Kimball Browning Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, Director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, and coeditor of Pathways Magazine. His research addresses the changing structure of late-industrial inequality and addresses such topics as (a) the role of rent-seeking and market failure in explaining the takeoff in income inequality, (b) the amount of economic and social mobility in the U.S. and other high-inequality countries (with a particular focus on the “Great Gatsby” hypothesis that opportunities for social mobility are declining), (c) the role of essentialism in explaining the persistence of extreme gender inequality, (d) the forces behind recent changes in the amount of face-to-face and online cross-class contact, and (e) the putative decline of big social classes. He is also involved in projects to improve the country’s infrastructure for monitoring poverty, inequality, and mobility by exploiting administrative and other forms of “big data” more aggressively. His recent books include Social Stratification (2014), Occupy the Future (2013), The New Gilded Age (2012), The Great Recession (2011), The Inequality Reader (2011), and The Inequality Puzzle (2010).

  • Jackelyn I-hwei Hwang

    Jackelyn I-hwei Hwang

    Assistant Professor of Sociology

    BioJackelyn Hwang is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a faculty affiliate at the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and the Urban Studies Program. Jackelyn’s main research interests are in the fields of urban sociology, race and ethnicity, immigration, and inequality. In particular, her research examines the relationship between how neighborhoods change and the persistence of neighborhood inequality by race and class in US cities. Her current projects focus on the causes and consequences of gentrification and developing automated methods for measuring neighborhood change using Google Street View imagery.

    Jackelyn received her B.A.S. in Sociology and Mathematics from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard University. After completing her Ph.D., she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Office of Population Research at Princeton University. Her research has been supported by the American Sociological Association, the Joint Center for Housing Studies, the National Science Foundation, among others. Her work has appeared in the American Sociological Review, Demography, Social Forces, and other academic journals.

  • Tomas Jimenez

    Tomas Jimenez

    Professor of Sociology

    BioTomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

    He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

    Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • Michael Kahan

    Michael Kahan

    Senior Lecturer of Sociology

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests19th and 20th Century Urban and Social History; Street Life; Urban Space