School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 501-520 of 584 Results

  • Michael Tomz

    Michael Tomz

    William Bennett Munro Professor in Political Science and Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

    BioMichael Tomz is the William Bennett Munro Professor in Political Science and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Stanford University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development, and the Landreth Family University Fellow in Undergraduate Education.

    Tomz has published in the fields of international relations, American politics, comparative politics, and statistical methods. He is the author of Reputation and International Cooperation: Sovereign Debt across Three Centuries and numerous articles in political science and economics journals.

    Tomz received the International Studies Association’s Karl Deutsch Award, given to a scholar who, within 10 years of earning a Ph.D., has made the most significant contribution to the study of international relations. He has also won the Giovanni Sartori Award for the best book developing or applying qualitative methods; the Jack L. Walker Award for the best article on Political Organizations and Parties; the best paper award from the APSA section on Elections, Public Opinion and Voting Behavior; the best paper award from the APSA section on Experimental Research; and the Okidata Best Research Software Award. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

    Tomz has received numerous teaching awards, including the Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Cox Medal for Excellence in Fostering Undergraduate Research. In 2017 he received Stanford’s highest teaching honor, the Walter J. Gores Award for Excellence in Teaching. He founded and continues to direct the Summer Research College program for undergraduates in political science.

    Tomz holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University; a master’s degree from the University of Oxford, where he was a Marshall Scholar; and an undergraduate degree from Georgetown University. He has been a visiting scholar at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, the Hoover Institution, the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences, and the International Monetary Fund.

  • Florencia Torche

    Florencia Torche

    Professor of Sociology

    BioFlorencia Torche is a social scientist with substantive interests in social demography, stratification, and education. Professor Torche’s scholarship encompasses two related areas. A longer-term area of research studies inequality dynamics -- the dynamics that result in persistence of inequality across generations -- with a particular focus on educational attainment, assortative mating (who marries who), and the intergenerational transmission of wealth. A more recent area of research examines the influence of early-life exposures –as early as the prenatal period– on individual development, attainment, and socioeconomic wellbeing. She has studied the effect of in-utero exposure to environmental stressors on children’s outcomes, and how these exposures contribute to the persistence of poverty across generations.

    Torche’s research combines diverse methodological approaches including quantitative analysis, causal inference, experiments and natural experiments, and in-depth interviews. Much of her research uses an international comparative perspective. She has conducted large cross-sectional and longitudinal surveys, including the first national survey on social mobility in Chile and Mexico. Her work has appeared in journals in sociology and other disciplines, such as the American Sociological Review, the American Journal of Sociology, the Annual Review of Sociology, Demography, Sociology of Education, Human Reproduction, and the International Journal of Epidemiology. Her research has received funding from the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the Spencer Foundation, among others.

    Professor Torche holds a BA from the Catholic University of Chile and an MA and PhD in Sociology from Columbia University.

  • Harold Trinkunas

    Harold Trinkunas

    Deputy Director

    BioHarold Trinkunas is the Deputy Director of and a Senior Research Scholar at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. Prior to arriving at Stanford, Dr. Trinkunas served as the Charles W. Robinson Chair and senior fellow and director of the Latin America Initiative in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. His research focuses on issues related to foreign policy, governance, and security, particularly in Latin America. Trinkunas has written on emerging powers and the international order, ungoverned spaces, terrorism financing, borders, and armed non-state actors.

    Trinkunas co-authored Militants, Criminals and Warlords: The Challenge of Local Governance in an Age of Disorder (Brookings Institution Press, 2017), Aspirational Power: Brazil’s Long Road to Global Influence (Brookings Institution Press, 2016) and authored Crafting Civilian Control of the Military in Venezuela (University of North Carolina Press, 2005). He co-edited and contributed to Three Tweets to Midnight: The Effects of the Global Information Ecosystem on the Risk of Nuclear Conflict (Hoover Institution Press, 2020); American Crossings: Border Politics in the Western Hemisphere (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015), Ungoverned Spaces: Alternatives to State Authority in an Era of Softened Sovereignty (Stanford University Press, 2010), Global Politics of Defense Reform (Palgrave MacMillan, 2008), and Terrorism Financing and State Responses (Stanford University Press, 2007).

    Dr. Trinkunas has also previously served as an associate professor and chair of the Department of National Security Affairs at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California. He received his doctorate in political science from Stanford University in 1999. He was born in Maracaibo, Venezuela.

  • Milana Trounce

    Milana Trounce

    Clinical Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. Boukhman Trounce graduated from the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine and went on to complete her emergency medicine residency and fellowship in Disaster Medicine and Bioterrorism Response at Harvard Medical School. She worked with the Center for Integration of Medicine and Technology (CIMT), a consortium of Harvard teaching hospitals and MIT, where she led BioSecurity related projects in conjunction with the US State Department. She also received her MBA from Stanford Business School.

    After Harvard she joined UCSF as an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine and was Medical Director for Disaster Response. For the past 11 years, she has been at Stanford Medical School, where she is a Clinical Professor of Emergency Medicine.

    She directs the BioSecurity program at Stanford, focused on protecting society from pandemics and other threats posed by infectious organisms, with a specific emphasis on approaches to interrupting transmission of infectious organisms in various settings. The background for the approach is outlined in her briefings at the Hoover Institute (see in publications list below). Stanford BioSecurity facilitates the creation of interdisciplinary solutions by bringing together experts in biology, medicine, public health, disaster management, policy, engineering, technology, and business. https://med.stanford.edu/biosecurity/about.html

    At Stanford, over the past ten years she has established and directed a class on BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience , which examines ways of building global societal resilience to pandemics and other biothreats and has educated over a thousand students. She has also taught an online Harvard course on medical response to biological terrorism, educating thousands of physicians globally.

    She has served as a spokeswoman for the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and is a founding Chair of BioSecurity at ACEP. In addition to her academic research and speaking at national conferences, she also consults nationally and internationally to healthcare systems, governments, and other organizations.

  • Jeanne L. Tsai

    Jeanne L. Tsai

    Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research examines how culture shapes affective processes (emotions, moods, feelings) and the implications cultural differences in these processes have for what decisions people make, how people think about health and illness, and how people perceive and respond to others in an increasingly multicultural world.

  • Edison Tse

    Edison Tse

    Associate Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioProfessor Tse received his BS, MS, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is the Director of Asia Center of Management Science and Engineering, which has the charter of developing executive training programs for executives in Asian enterprises, conducting research on development of the emerging economy in Asia and establishing research affiliations with Asian enterprises, with a special focus in Greater China: China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.
    In 1973, he received the prestigious Donald Eckman Award from the American Automatic Control Council in recognition of his outstanding contribution in the field of Automatic Control. He had served as an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions of Automatic Control, and a co-editor of the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, which he co-founded. In recent years he dedicated his research effort in dynamic entrepreneurial strategy and transformation of Chinese production economy to innovation economy. He developed a significant theory on innovation synergistic to Chinese culture and its application to China industry transformation. Over the years he has made valuable contributions in the field of engineering, economics, and business creation and expansion. He has published over 180 papers on his research activities. Since March 2003, he has been teaching his new found theory on China innovation and Industry Transformation to high level Chinese government officials and Chinese executives.
    Since 2007, he co-directed a Stanford Financial Engineering Certificate Program in Hong Kong that upgrades the quality of managers and traders in the financial institutions in Hong Kong. Since 2009, he co-directed a Stanford program on Regional Industry Transformation and Public Administration that was attended by city officials from various cities in China, and directs a Stanford program on Chinese Industry Transformation and Innovation that was attended by executives from Chinese enterprises. Prof. Tse is the author of over 150 articles in the fields of systems and control. He received the 1973 Donald P. Eckman Award for outstanding achievement in the field of automatic control. Prior to joining the Stanford faculty, he worked at Systems Control, Inc., where he formulated and solved numerous problems in defense, electric power, forecasting and marketing.
    At Stanford, he has developed computer integrated systems to support fishery management policy decisions, management and control of the manufacturing enterprise, and industrial competitive analysis and product development. He is currently conducting research on building core competence within an enterprise to gain competitive advantage. He established the Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control and is now a member of its Advisory Board. His national society memberships include the Econometric Society, IEEE, ORSA, and TIMS. Tse developed a framework for analyzing dynamic competitive strategy based on a dynamic model of grabber-holder dynamics that describes the forces that would shape the formation of an ecosystem supporting an exciting vision. Within such a framework, he developed dynamic strategies for firms entering an emerging market, latecomers that want to wedge into a matured market, and firms that need to turn danger into opportunities. Tse’s recent interests are in extending the theory to analyzing the dynamic competition in network economy, regional technology center development, and applying the theory of dynamic strategies to the wireless, airport, real estate, and financial industries in China.

  • Frederick Turner

    Frederick Turner

    Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication, Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education and Professor, by courtesy, of Art and Art History and of History

    BioFred Turner’s research and teaching focus on media technology and cultural change. He is especially interested in the ways that emerging media have helped shape American life since World War II.

    Turner is the author of three books: The Democratic Surround: Multimedia and American Liberalism from World War II to the Psychedelic Sixties; From Counterculture to Cyberculture: Stewart Brand, the Whole Earth Network and the Rise of Digital Utopianism; and Echoes of Combat: The Vietnam War in American Memory. His essays have tackled topics ranging from the rise of reality crime television to the role of the Burning Man festival in contemporary new media industries. They are available here: fredturner.stanford.edu/essays/.

    Turner’s research has received a number of academic awards and has been featured in publications ranging from Science and the New York Times to Ten Zen Monkeys. It has also been translated into French, Spanish, German, Polish and Chinese.

    Turner is also the Akiko Yamazaki and Jerry Yang University Fellow in Undergraduate Education. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, Turner taught Communication at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He also worked as a freelance journalist for ten years, writing for the Boston Sunday Globe Magazine, the Boston Phoenix, and the Pacific News Service.

    Turner earned his Ph.D. in Communication from the University of California, San Diego. He has also earned a B.A. in English and American Literature from Brown University and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.

  • Barbara Tversky

    Barbara Tversky

    Professor of Psychology, Emerita

    BioBarbara Tversky studied cognitive psychology at the University of Michigan. She held positions first at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and then at Stanford, from 1978-2005 when she took early retirement. She is an active Emerita Professor of Psychology at Stanford and Professor of Psychology at Columbia Teachers College. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, the Cognitive Science Society, the Society for Experimental Psychology, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the American Academy of Arts and Science. She has been on the Governing Boards of the Psychonomic Society, the Cognitive Science Society, the International Union of Psychological Science, and the Association for Psychological Science. She has served on the editorial boards of many journals and the organizing committees of dozens of international interdisciplinary meetings.

    Her research has spanned memory, categorization, language, spatial cognition, event perception and cognition, diagrammatic reasoning, sketching, creativity, design, and gesture. The overall goals have been to uncover how people think about the spaces they inhabit and the actions they perform and see and then how people use the world, including their own actions and creations, to remember, to think, to create, to communicate. A forthcoming book, Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought, will overview that work. She has collaborated widely, with linguists, philosophers, neuroscientists, computer scientists, chemists, biologists, architects, designers, and artists.

  • Jun Uchida

    Jun Uchida

    Associate Professor of History

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy current book project examines the diasporic history of Ōmi shōnin (merchant). Often compared to overseas Chinese and Jewish merchants, merchants of Ōmi (present-day Shiga prefecture) are famous for peddling textiles and other goods across the early modern Japanese archipelago. My aim is to trace their activities into the global age of capital and empire, from cotton trade and manufacturing in China to retail commerce in Korea and Manchuria, and immigration to North America.

  • Johan Ugander

    Johan Ugander

    Assistant Professor of Management Science and Engineering

    BioUgander's research develops algorithmic and statistical frameworks for analyzing social networks, social systems, and other large-scale data-rich contexts. He is particularly interested in the challenges of causal inference and experimentation in these complex domains. His work commonly falls at the intersections of graph theory, statistics, optimization, and algorithm design.

  • Guadalupe Valdes

    Guadalupe Valdes

    Bonnie Katz Tenenbaum Professor in Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFounding partner of Understanding Language, an initiative that focuses attention on the role of language in subject-area learning, with a special focus on helping English Language Learners meet the new Common Core State Standards and Next Generation Science Standards.

  • Blakey Vermeule

    Blakey Vermeule

    Albert Guérard Professor in Literature

    BioBlakey Vermeule's research interests are neuroaesthetics, cognitive and evolutionary approaches to art, philosophy and literature, British literature from 1660-1820, post-Colonial fiction, satire, and the history of the novel. She is the author of The Party of Humanity: Writing Moral Psychology in Eighteenth-Century Britain (2000) and Why Do We Care About Literary Characters? (2009), both from The Johns Hopkins University Press. She is writing a book about what mind science has discovered about the unconscious.