School of Humanities and Sciences


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  • Gavin Wright

    Gavin Wright

    William Robertson Coe Professor in American Economic History, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Wright is now studying the economic implications of voting rights and vote suppression in the American South. He is also revisiting the relationship between slavery and Anglo-American capitalism.

  • Yan Xia

    Yan Xia

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOrganic Chemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Organic Optoelectronic Materials, Microporous Polymers, Responsive Polymers, Polymer Networks, Self-Assembly

  • Xiaoze Xie

    Xiaoze Xie

    Paul L. and Phyllis Wattis Professor in Art

    BioXiaoze Xie received his Master of Fine Art degrees from the Central Academy of Arts & Design in Beijing and the University of North Texas. He has had solo exhibitions at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, AZ; Dallas Visual Art Center, TX; Modern Chinese Art Foundation, Gent, Belgium; Charles Cowles Gallery, New York; Gallery Paule Anglim, San Francisco; Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto; China Art Archives and Warehouse, Beijing; Gaain Gallery, Seoul; Devin Borden Hiram Butler Gallery, Houston, TX; among others. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions including Shu: Reinventing Books in Contemporary Chinese Art at the China Institute Gallery in New York and Seattle Asian Art Museum, and the traveling exhibition Regeneration: Contemporary Chinese Art from China and the US. His 2004 solo at Charles Cowles was reviewed in “The New York Times”, “Art in America” and "Art Asia Pacific". More recent shows have been reviewed in “Chicago Tribune”, “The Globe and Mail” and “San Francisco Chronicle”. His work is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art and the Arizona State University Art Museum. Xie received the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant (2003) and artist awards from Phoenix Art Museum (1999) and Dallas Museum of Art (1996). Xie is the Paul L. & Phyllis Wattis Professor of Art at Stanford University.

  • Yiqing Xu

    Yiqing Xu

    Assistant Professor of Political Science

    BioDr. Xu's primary research covers political methodology, Chinese politics, and their intersection. He received a PhD in Political Science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2016), an MA in Economics from China Center for Economic Research at Peking University (2010) and a BA in Economics (2007) from Fudan University.

    His work has appeared in American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Political Analysis, Political Science Research and Methods, among other peer-reviewed journals. He has won several professional awards, including the best article award from American Journal of Political Science in 2016 and the Miller Prize for the best work appearing in Political Analysis in 2017.

  • Daniel Yamins

    Daniel Yamins

    Assistant Professor of Psychology and of Computer Science

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab's research lies at intersection of neuroscience, artificial intelligence, psychology and large-scale data analysis. It is founded on two mutually reinforcing hypotheses:

    H1. By studying how the brain solves computational challenges, we can learn to build better artificial intelligence algorithms.

    H2. Through improving artificial intelligence algorithms, we'll discover better models of how the brain works.

    We investigate these hypotheses using techniques from computational modeling and artificial intelligence, high-throughput neurophysiology, functional brain imaging, behavioral psychophysics, and large-scale data analysis.

  • Sylvia Yanagisako

    Sylvia Yanagisako

    Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies

    BioSylvia Yanagisako is the Edward Clark Crossett Professor of Humanistic Studies and Professor in the Department of Anthropology. Her research and publications have focused on the cultural processes through which kinship, gender, capitalism, and labor have been forged in Italy and the U.S. She has also written about the orthodox configuration of the discipline of anthropology in the U.S. and considered alternatives to it (Unwrapping the Sacred Bundle: Reflections on the Disciplining of Anthropology, 2005).

    Professor Yanagisako’s latest book, Fabricating Transnational Capitalism: a Collaborative Ethnography of Italian-Chinese Global Fashion (Duke University Press, 2019) co-authored with Lisa Rofel, analyzes the transnational business relations forged by Italian and Chinese textile and garment manufacturers. This book builds on her monograph (Producing Culture and Capital, 2002) which examined the cultural processes through which a technologically-advanced, Italian manufacturing industry was produced.

    Professor Yanagisako has served as President of the Society for Cultural Anthropology, Chair of the Department of Anthropology at Stanford, and Chair of the Program in Feminist Studies at Stanford. She received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1992.

  • Victor Yanez

    Victor Yanez

    Lecturer

    BioVictor Yañez-Lazcano received his MFA from Stanford University and his BFA from Columbia College Chicago. While in Chicago he balanced a freelance career in both commercial and fine art photography. During this time, he also established himself as an arts educator through the Museum of Contemporary Photography and Columbia College’s Project AIM(Arts Integration and Mentorship). Yañez-Lazcano also helped to co-found LATITUDE, a non-profit community digital lab for photographers in Chicago. His work has been exhibited at numerous spaces including Royal Nonesuch Gallery(Oakland), Natalie & James Thompson Art Gallery (San Jose), Harrington College of Design, Columbia College Chicago’s A+D Gallery, and Riverside Arts Center, as well as Mind/Matter Gallery (Rochester), Aviary Gallery (Boston), and South Haven Center for the Arts(Michigan). Past residencies include SOMA Summer (Mexico City) the Industry of the Ordinary’s Summer School Residency(Chicago), ACRE(Stueben,WI), and Ox-Bow(Saugatuck, MI). Victor is currently a visiting lecturer in Art & Art History at Stanford University.

  • Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

    Professor of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Emerita

    BioProfessor Yarbro-Bejarano is interested in Chicana/o cultural studies with an emphasis on gender and queer theory; race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    She is the author of Feminism and the Honor Plays of Lope de Vega (1994), The Wounded Heart: Writing on Cherríe Moraga (2001), and co-editor of Chicano Art: Resistance and Affirmation (1991). She has published numerous articles on Chicana/o literature and culture. She teaches Introduction to Chicana/o Studies and a variety of undergraduate courses on literature, art, film/video, theater/performance and everyday cultural practices. Her graduate seminars include topics such as race and nation; interrogating critical concepts in Chicana/o literature; and representations of race, sexuality and gender in cultural production by Chicanas/os and Latinas/os.

    Since 1994, Professor Yarbro-Bejarano has been developing "Chicana Art," a digital archive of images focusing on women artists. Professor Yarbro-Bejarano is chair of the Chicana/o Studies Program in Stanford's Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

  • Ali Yaycioglu

    Ali Yaycioglu

    Associate Professor of History

    BioMy main research interest is the Middle East and the Balkans under the Ottoman Empire. In my forthcoming book, Partners of the Empire: Notables, Communities and the Crisis of the Ottoman Order (1770-1820), which is a revised version of my dissertation, I analyze the rise of the provincial notables and different forms of collective actions in various parts of the Ottoman world and their challenge to the empire. I depict how the new provincial formations triggered institutional restructuring of the Ottoman order in the global age of revolutions. Currently, I am working on two different projects. The first one is on capital accumulation and imperial confiscations in the Ottoman Empire, roughly from 16th to the early 19th centuries. In this project, I focus on economic and social implications of imperial confiscations and examine how some individuals and families developed strategies to maintain their wealth and power and to escape from the constant threat of imperial seizure. I also analyze how this instability of property rights affected attitudes towards inheritance, life and mortality in Ottoman society. My other project is on the imaginations of the political spaces in Early Modern Eurasia. In this project, I am particularly interested in the interactions and competitions between territorial organizations of the early modern Eurasian empires, particularly the Ottoman Empire, and exterritorial imaginations and practices of the Islamic and Chingissid legacies.

  • Yinyu Ye

    Yinyu Ye

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering

    BioYinyu Ye is currently the Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in the School of Engineering at the Department of Management Science and Engineering and Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering and the Director of the MS&E Industrial Affiliates Program, Stanford University. He received the B.S. degree in System Engineering from the Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Engineering-Economic Systems and Operations Research from Stanford University. Ye's research interests lie in the areas of optimization, complexity theory, algorithm design and analysis, and applications of mathematical programming, operations research and system engineering. He is also interested in developing optimization software for various real-world applications. Current research topics include Liner Programming Algorithms, Markov Decision Processes, Computational Game/Market Equilibrium, Metric Distance Geometry, Dynamic Resource Allocation, and Stochastic and Robust Decision Making, etc. He is an INFORMS (The Institute for Operations Research and The Management Science) Fellow, and has received several research awards including the winner of the 2014 SIAG/Optimization Prize awarded every three years to the author(s) of the most outstanding paper, the inaugural 2012 ISMP Tseng Lectureship Prize for outstanding contribution to continuous optimization, the 2009 John von Neumann Theory Prize for fundamental sustained contributions to theory in Operations Research and the Management Sciences, the inaugural 2006 Farkas prize on Optimization, and the 2009 IBM Faculty Award. He has supervised numerous doctoral students at Stanford who received received the 2015 and 2013 Second Prize of INFORMS Nicholson Student Paper Competition, the 2013 INFORMS Computing Society Prize, the 2008 Nicholson Prize, and the 2006 and 2010 INFORMS Optimization Prizes for Young Researchers. Ye teaches courses on Optimization, Network and Integer Programming, Semidefinite Programming, etc. He has written extensively on Interior-Point Methods, Approximation Algorithms, Conic Optimization, and their applications; and served as a consultant or technical board member to a variety of industries, including MOSEK.

  • Lee Yearley

    Lee Yearley

    Walter Y. Evans-Wentz Professor of Oriental Philosophy, Religions and Ethics

    BioLee Yearley works in comparative religious ethics and poetics, focusing on materials from China and the West. He is the author of The Ideas of Newman: Christianity and Human Religiosity and Mencius and Aquinas: Theories of Virtue and Conceptions of Courage (recently translated into Chinese), as well as numerous journal articles and essays in edited volumes.

    Professor Yearley holds a Ph.D. from University of Chicago.

  • Halil Ibrahim Yenigun

    Halil Ibrahim Yenigun

    Lecturer

    BioHalil Ibrahim Yenigün is a visiting post-doctoral scholar at Stanford University's Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies. In 2016-17, he was a fellow of Europe in the Middle East—the Middle East in Europe (EUME) at the Forum Transregionale Studien, Berlin. Earlier, he had been dismissed from his assistant professor position at Istanbul Commerce University soon after Erdoğan regime kicked off the purge and persecution of non-loyal academics in reaction to the Petition for Peace. At the time, he was also a part-time Research Fellow at Sabancı University Istanbul Policy Center's POMEAS Project. Yenigün received his Ph.D. in August 2013 from the University of Virginia's (UVA) political theory program with his dissertation titled, The Political Ontology of Islamic Democracy: An Ontological Narrative of Contemporary Muslim Political Thought. He spent 2007-2008 as a research fellow in the Middle Eastern Studies Center at the American University in Cairo (AUC).
    Yenigün has published articles, book chapters, and opinion pieces in several journals and magazines, including Third World Quarterly, Turkish Studies, and opendemocracy.net. He has also given lectures at several universities in Turkey, US, and Germany as well as occasional interviews to numerous media sources on Muslim political thought, Islamism, peace activism, and Turkish democracy.
    Yenigün's primary research is on comparative political theory with a specific focus on contemporary Muslim political thought and Islamism. He has been also involved, as a founder or officer, in several NGOs that work on human rights, social justice issues, and free circulation of ideas. He is among the group of academics in Turkey known as Academics for Peace.

  • Janine Zacharia

    Janine Zacharia

    Lecturer

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInterested in new forms of foreign correspondence, how stories go viral, the intersection between technology/social media and national security. Middle East/Israel is my main area of reporting expertise.

  • Annie Zaenen

    Annie Zaenen

    Adjunct Professor

    BioAfter spending my youth on worthy but often hopeless political causes and despairing about philosophy in Belgium, in my earlier thirties I discovered Linguistics and went to get my Ph.D at Harvard in 1980 on a dissertation on Extraction Rules in Icelandic. With Joan Maling I focused the attention of the syntax community on phenomena such as Icelandic quirky case proving that the subject of a sentence is not always in the nominative case, notwithstanding pronouncements of some of the Harvard faculty, and showed that Chomsky's ill-advised that-trace filter was certainly not a universal, although there still seem to be syntacticians that live under the illusion that it is. With many others, I turned Perlmutter's pleasantly simple unaccusative hypothesis into the mess that it now is.

    On the constructive side, I have contributed to the theory of Lexical Functional Grammar (LFG) in the development of notions such as long-distance dependencies, functional uncertainty and the difference between subsumption and equality. As a frustrated early adopter of Lauri Karttunen's development tools for two-level morphology at Xerox PARC, I managed to create, with help from Carol Neidle, a morphological analyzer for French that, after some revisions, became an Inxight product.

    After an adventurous stint as an area manager at the Xerox European Research Center near Grenoble, France, in the 1990s, I have been back in the Bay Area doing research since 2001. I retired from PARC in 2011 and I am now once in a while working at CSLI and teaching Linguistics at Stanford. In 2011, Lauri Karttunen and I taught a course on From Syntax to Natural Logic at the LSA Summer Institute in Boulder. The slides can be found here.

    I am the editor of an online CSLI journal, LiLT (Linguistic Issues in Language Technology)

  • Jamil Zaki

    Jamil Zaki

    Associate Professor of Psychology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research focuses on the cognitive and neural bases of social behavior, and in particular on how people respond to each other's emotions (empathy), why they conform to each other (social influence), and why they choose to help each other (prosociality).

  • Richard Zare

    Richard Zare

    Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor in Natural Science and Professor, by courtesy, of Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research group is exploring a variety of topics that range from the basic understanding of chemical reaction dynamics to the nature of the chemical contents of single cells.

    Under thermal conditions nature seems to hide the details of how elementary reactions occur through a series of averages over reagent velocity, internal energy, impact parameter, and orientation. To discover the effects of these variables on reactivity, it is necessary to carry out studies of chemical reactions far from equilibrium in which the states of the reactants are more sharply restricted and can be varied in a controlled manner. My research group is attempting to meet this tough experimental challenge through a number of laser techniques that prepare reactants in specific quantum states and probe the quantum state distributions of the resulting products. It is our belief that such state-to-state information gives the deepest insight into the forces that operate in the breaking of old bonds and the making of new ones.

    Space does not permit a full description of these projects, and I earnestly invite correspondence. The following examples are representative:

    The simplest of all neutral bimolecular reactions is the exchange reaction H H2 -> H2 H. We are studying this system and various isotopic cousins using a tunable UV laser pulse to photodissociate HBr (DBr) and hence create fast H (D) atoms of known translational energy in the presence of H2 and/or D2 and using a laser multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer to detect the nascent molecular products in a quantum-state-specific manner by means of an imaging technique. It is expected that these product state distributions will provide a key test of the adequacy of various advanced theoretical schemes for modeling this reaction.

    Analytical efforts involve the use of capillary zone electrophoresis, two-step laser desorption laser multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry, cavity ring-down spectroscopy, and Hadamard transform time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We believe these methods can revolutionize trace analysis, particularly of biomolecules in cells.

  • Xueguang Zhou

    Xueguang Zhou

    Kwoh-Ting Li Professor in Economic Development and Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInstitutional changes in contemporary Chinese society.

  • Yiqun Zhou

    Yiqun Zhou

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and, by courtesy, of Classics

    BioResearch Areas:
    - Chinese and comparative women’s history

    - Early Chinese literature and history

    - Chinese and English fiction (1600-1900)

    - China-Greece comparative studies

  • Steven Zipperstein

    Steven Zipperstein

    The Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History

    BioSteven J. Zipperstein is Daniel E. Koshland Professor in Jewish Culture and History. For sixteen years, beginning in 1991, he was Director of the Taube Center for Jewish Studies. In 2007-8, he was Weinstock Visiting Professor at Harvard University; he has held a research appointment for several years at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at Harvard. Zipperstein taught at Oxford (for six years), and at universities in France, Russia, and Poland. His first book, The Jews of Odessa: A Cultural History, 1794-1881 (Stanford University Press, 1985) won the Smilen Prize and was named the outstanding book on Jewish history published that year. It has been translated into Russian. His second book, Elusive Prophet: Ahad Ha’am and the Origins of Zionism (University of California Press, 1993) won the National Jewish Book Award. In 1998, it appeared in Israel in a Hebrew translation published by the Ofakim series of Am Oved. Imagining Russian Jewry: Memory, History, Identity -- based on the Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies – appeared with the University of Washington Press in 1999. He has co-edited three volumes, including (with Jonathan Frankel) Assimilation and Community: The Jews in Nineteenth-Century Europe (Cambridge University Press, 1992), and The Worlds of S. An-sky: A Russian Jewish intellectual at the Turn of the Century (with Gabriella Safran) which was the winner of the Leviant Prize of the Modern Language Association. Zipperstein's most recent book, Rosenfeld's Lives: Fame, Oblivion, and the Furies of Writing (Yale Univerisity Press, 2009), was shortlisted for the National Jewish Book Award in biography, autobiography, and memoir, and was reviewed widely in United States, the Uk, and elsewhere. He is currently completing a cultural history of Russian Jewry at the turn of the 20th century and senior editor of a series of three documentary volumes (the first of which is "Jews and the Russian Revolution") sponsored by the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, in New York.

    In spring 2014, Professor Zipperstein was named the first Jacob Kronhill Visiting Scholar at the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research. He has also held fellowships at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, the Institute for Advanced Studies Jerusalem, at Wolfson College, Oxford, the Oxford Centre for Hebrew Studies, the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Yitzhak Rabin Center, in Tel Aviv, and the Stanford Humanities Center. He is President on the Conference on Jewish Social Studies, he was Vice President of the Association for Jewish Studies, and served for seven years as Chair of the Koret Book Awards. He is the recipient of the Judah L. Magnes Gold Medal from the American Friends of the Hebrew University, and the Koret Prize for outstanding contributions to Jewish life. He has given the Weizmann Memorial Lecture in the Humanities at the Weizmann Institute, and endowed lectures at Wesleyan, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers, Indiana University at Bloomington, Brown, Tulane, Franklin and Marshall, Rutgers, UC Berkeley, University of Texas, Austin, University of Oregon, University of Florida, Northwestern, University of Illinois, Champaign, and elsewhere. He is the immediate past Chair of the Academic Advisory Council of the Center for Jewish History, in New York, a member of the academic advisory board of the YIVO Institute for Jewish Research, an editorial board member for the Cambridge Dictionary of Judaism and he is on the international editorial board of the Posen Library of Jewish Civilization. He is on the board of several academic journals in Israel, Germany, and Russia. In 2002, he was J. B. Shapiro Senior Scholar in Residence at the United Memorial Holocaust Museum, in Washington D.C.

  • Dafna Zur

    Dafna Zur

    Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures

    BioDafna Zur is an Associate Professor in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at Stanford University. She teaches courses on Korean literature, cinema, and popular culture. Her book, Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea (Stanford University Press, 2017), traces the affective investments and coded aspirations made possible by children’s literature in colonial and postcolonial Korea. She is working on a new project on moral education in science and literary youth magazines in postwar North and South Korea. She has published articles on North Korean science fiction, the Korean War in North and South Korean children’s literature, childhood in cinema, and Korean popular culture. Her translations of Korean fiction have appeared in wordwithoutborders.org, The Columbia Anthology of Modern Korean Short Stories, and the Asia Literary Review.

  • Arnold Zwicky

    Arnold Zwicky

    Adjunct Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch areas:
    Syntactic theory: Construction-based syntax
    Syntactic variation
    The advice literature on grammar, usage, and style
    Morphological theory: Lexeme-based, realizational morphology
    Theory of grammar: Interfaces between phonology, morphology, and syntax
    Language, gender, and sexuality
    The language of comics