School of Humanities and Sciences


Showing 21-30 of 31 Results

  • Bissera Pentcheva

    Bissera Pentcheva

    Professor of Art and Art History and, by courtesy, of Classics

    BioBissera Pentcheva's work focuses on Byzantium and the medieval Mediterranean, more specifically aesthetics, phenomenology, and acoustics. Her most recent book Hagia Sophia: Sound, Space and Spirit in Byzantium (Penn State University Press 2017) explores the interconnection among acoutsics, architecture, and liturgical rite. She has also edited, Aural Architecture in Byzantium: Music, Acoustics and Ritual (Ashgate, 2017). Pentcheva has published another two books with Pennsylvania State University Press: Icons and Power: The Mother of God in Byzantium, 2006 that won the John Nicholas Brown prize form the Medieval Academy of America in 2010 and The Sensual Icon: Space, Ritual, and the Senses in Byzantium, 2010. She has held a number of prestigious fellowships among them: J. S Guggenheim, American Academy of Rome, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin, Mellon New Directions Fellowship for the study of Classical Arabic, Alexander von Humboldt (Germany), Onassis Foundation (Greece), Dumbarton Oaks, and Columbia University's Mellon Post-doctoral fellowship. Her work has been published at the Art Bulletin, Speculum, Gesta, and Res. Anthropology and Aesthetics, and Convivium.

  • Maurice Rehm

    Maurice Rehm

    Professor of Theater and Performance Studies and of Classics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStanford Repertory Theater (SRT) is set to launch its 17th summer festival, this summer (2015) dedicated to the work of Noel Coward. Our mainstage production is *Hay Fever* and secondstage production *A Coward Cabaret*. The festival includes an all-day community symposium, continuing studies course *Theater on Theater*, and film festival on Coward. Our 2016 SRT Festival will focus on "Theater and Labor" with productions of Naomi Wallace's *Slaughter City* and Clifford Odets' *Waiting for Lefty."

    I continue working on a long-term project entitled "Bilingual Beckett," which has included Stanford Repertory Theater's bilingual production of Samuel Beckett's *Happy Days/Oh les beaux jours," performed at Stanford, San Francisco, Montpellier, and Paris.

    Professor Eleni Papalexiou at the University of the Peloponnese and I are collaborating to develop a summer institute in the Argolid, "Ancient Tragedies/Modern Stages," exploring contemporary approaches to staging Greek tragedy.

    In winter 2016, SRT will remount "Words and Images to End All War," a theater piece I developed this year on World War I, supported by Stanford Arts Institute, Stanford Continuing Studies, TAPS, and Art and Art History.

    SRT's "Comparative Clytemnestra" (performance/lecture focusing on the various treatments of Clytemnestra in Greek tragedy, with actress Courtney Walsh) will travel to New Zealand and Australia in the fall of 2015. This work will find its way into the revision of my 1992 *Greek Tragic Theatre,* which will come out in a new version entitled *Understanding Greek Tragedy* in 2016

  • Michael Shanks

    Michael Shanks

    Professor of Classics

    BioResearch interests:

    design history and research; archaeological theory; heritage studies and archaeologies of the contemporary past; the archaeology of Grece-Roman urbanism; the regional archaeology of the English-Scottish borders.

    Recent books:

    Archaeology in the making: conversations through a discipline. Edited with Bill Rathje and Chris Witmore. Routledge 2013.

    Archaeology: the discipline of things. With Bjørnar Olsen, Tim Webmoor and Chris Witmore. University of California Press, 2012.

    The archaeological imagination. Left Coast Press, 2012.

    Archaeologies of presence: art, performance and the persistence of being. Edited with Nick Kaye and Gabriella Giannachi. Routledge, 2012.

    Current projects:

    An archaeology of antiquity. With Gary Devore. For Oxford University Press.

    The Revs Program at Stanford. Automotive archaeology.

    From Tyne to Tweed. An archaeology of the English-Scottish borders, including excavations of the Roman town of Binchester.

    http://mshanks.com

  • Susan Stephens

    Susan Stephens

    Sara Hart Kimball Professor in the Humanities

    BioMy early formal training was as a papyrologist. For a number of years I published texts from the Oxyrhynchus and the Yale papyrus collections before turning to the two areas of research that continue to occupy me: the political and social dimensions of Hellenistic literature (and its later reception) and ancient Greek fiction writing. With Jack Winkler I edited Ancient Greek Novels: The Fragments (Princeton) in 1995, and I continue to write on the social contexts of the novels and on Hellenistic Egypt more generally. In 1998 I began to write on the Hellenistic poets suggesting that their poems could be best be understood as contextualized responses to a new time and place—the recently founded city of Alexandria. Seeing Double: Intercultural Poetics in Ptolemaic Alexandria, which appeared in 2003, was a study of how the local Egyptian contours of Ptolemaic kingship informed the poetry of Callimachus, Theocritus, and Apollonius. Since then then I have turned to Callimachus’ reception of earlier writing (particularly Herodotus and Plato), his imagined geographies, and his appropriation of earlier Greek myths of North Africa. Callimachus in Context. From Plato to the Alexandrian Poets (with Benjamin Acosta-Hughes, Cambridge, 2011) and Brill’s Companion to Callimachus (co-edited with Acosta-Hughes and Luigi Lehnus) will both appear this summer.

    At the moment I am writing a commentary on Callimachus’ Hymns and, in an effort to make Callimachus’ Aetia more accessible and user friendly, will be facilitating a website located on the Stanford server.

  • Jennifer Trimble

    Jennifer Trimble

    Associate Professor of Classics

    BioJennifer Trimble works on the visual and material culture of the Roman Empire, with interests in portraits and replication, the visual culture of Roman slavery, comparative urbanism, and ancient mapping. Her book on Women and Visual Replication in Roman Imperial Art and Culture (Cambridge University Press, 2011) explores the role of visual sameness in constructing public identity and articulating empire and place. Trimble was co-director of the IRC-Oxford-Stanford excavations in the Roman Forum (now being prepared for publication), focused on the interactions of commercial, religious and monumental space. She also co-directed Stanford's Digital Forma Urbis Romae Project, a collaboration between computer scientists and archaeologists to help reassemble a fragmentary ancient map of the city of Rome.

  • Caroline Winterer

    Caroline Winterer

    Willilam Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, Professor of History and, by courtesy, of Classics and of Education

    BioCaroline Winterer is William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Studies, and Professor by courtesy of Classics. She specializes in American history before 1900, especially the history of ideas, political thought, and the history of science. She is currently writing a book on the history of deep time in America, to be published by Princeton University Press.

    She teaches classes on American history until 1900, including American cultural and intellectual history, the American Enlightenment, the history of science, and the trans-Atlantic contexts of American thought.

    She is the author of five books, including most recently Time in Maps: From the Age of Discovery to Our Digital Era (Chicago, 2020), edited with her Stanford colleague Karen Wigen. Assembling a group of distinguished historians, cartographers, and art historians, the book shows how maps around the world for the last 500 years have ingeniously handled time in the spatial medium of maps.

    Her book American Enlightenments: Pursuing Happiness in the Age of Reason (Yale, 2016), showed how early Americans grappled with the promises of the Enlightenment – how they used new questions about the plants, animals, rocks, politics, religions and peoples of the New World to imagine a new relationship between the present and the past, and to spur far-flung conversations about a better future for all of humanity. Earlier books and articles have explored America's long tradition of looking at the ancient classical world for political, artistic, and cultural inspiration. She received an American Ingenuity Award from the Smithsonian Institution for mapping the social network of Benjamin Franklin: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/dear-sir-ben-franklin-would-like-to-add-you-to-his-network-180947639/.

    She is currently accepting graduate students. For more information on the PhD program in the Department of History, visit: https://history.stanford.edu/academics/graduate-degree-programs.