Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine


Showing 31-37 of 37 Results

  • Judith Shizuru

    Judith Shizuru

    Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTransplantation of defined populations of allogeneic hematopoietic cells. Specifically, the way in which hematopoietic cell grafts alter antigen specific immune responses to allo-, auto- and viral antigens. The cellular and molecular basis of resistance to engraftment of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells.

  • Thomas Sudhof

    Thomas Sudhof

    Avram Goldstein Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsInformation transfer at synapses mediates information processing in brain, and is impaired in many brain diseases. Thomas Südhof is interested in how synapses are formed, how presynaptic terminals release neurotransmitters at synapses, and how synapses become dysfunctional in diseases such as autism or Alzheimer's disease. To address these questions, Südhof's laboratory employs approaches ranging from biophysical studies to the electrophysiological and behavioral analyses of mutant mice.

  • Sivakamasundari V

    Sivakamasundari V

    Instructor, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine

    BioMy research interests are focused on understanding the molecular basis of early development and stem cells, as it is often aberrations in stem cells or signaling mechanisms between tissues that lead to diseased states, including tumor development and cancer progression. Knowledge of stem cells and development is also critical to develop appropriate cell-based therapies for various diseases or injuries. My prior and current works take advantage of both traditional techniques (gene targeting, lineage tracing) and state-of-the-art technologies (Single cell RNA sequencing, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP-seq), Imaging Mass Cytometry) to elucidate fundamental molecular mechanisms underlying signaling in tissue biology.

  • Irving Weissman

    Irving Weissman

    Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Pathology, and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsStem cell and cancer stem cell biology; development of T and B lymphocytes; cell-surface receptors for oncornaviruses in leukemia. Hematopoietic stem cells; Lymphocyte homing, lymphoma invasiveness and metastasis; order of events from hematopoietic stem cells [HSC] to AML leukemia stem cells and blood diseases, and parallels in other tissues; discovery of tumor and pathogenic cell 'don't eat me' and 'eat me' signals, and translation into therapeutics.

  • Gerlinde Wernig

    Gerlinde Wernig

    Assistant Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFibrotic diseases kill more people than cancer in this country and worldwide. We believe that scar-forming cells called fibroblasts are at the core of the fibrotic response in parenchymal organ fibrosis in the lung, liver, skin, bone marrow and tumor stroma. At the cellular level we think of fibrosis as a step wise process which implicates inflammation and fibrosis. We seek to identify new effective immune therapy targets to treat fibrotic diseases.

  • Marius Wernig

    Marius Wernig

    Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEpigenetic Reprogramming, Direct conversion of fibroblasts into neurons, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Neural Differentiation: implications in development and regenerative medicine

  • Joanna Wysocka

    Joanna Wysocka

    Lorry Lokey Professor and Professor of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe precise and robust regulation of gene expression is a cornerstone for complex biological life. Research in our laboratory is focused on understanding how regulatory information encoded by the genome is integrated with the transcriptional machinery and chromatin context to allow for emergence of form and function during human embryogenesis and evolution, and how perturbations in this process lead to disease.