School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 24 Results

  • Steven Artandi

    Steven Artandi

    Jerome and Daisy Low Gilbert Professor and Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsTelomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Robert Baldwin

    Robert Baldwin

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI closed my laboratory when I retired in 1998. I continue to do research, chiefly in collaboration with Franc Avbelj, on problems of protein folding energetics, especially peptide backbone solvation, and to write reviews.

  • Philip Beachy

    Philip Beachy

    The Ernest and Amelia Gallo Professor in the School of Medicine, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFunction of Hedgehog proteins and other extracellular signals in morphogenesis (pattern formation), in injury repair and regeneration (pattern maintenance). We study how the distribution of such signals is regulated in tissues, how cells perceive and respond to distinct concentrations of signals, and how such signaling pathways arose in evolution. We also study the normal roles of such signals in stem-cell physiology and their abnormal roles in the formation and expansion of cancer stem cells.

  • Onn Brandman

    Onn Brandman

    Assistant Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Brandman Lab studies how cells ensure protein quality and how they signal stress. To achieve this, we employ an integrated set of techniques including single cell anaysis of stress pathways, structural studies, in vitro translation, and full genome screens in yeast and mammalian cells.

  • Patrick O. Brown

    Patrick O. Brown

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Brown's research group uses diverse experimental and computational methods to investigate the logic and mechanisms that control a genome's expression program. The Brown laboratory is systematically characterizing the genetic scripts that control the expression of our genes, in normal development and physiology and in diseases like cancer, with a particular focus on post-transcriptional regulation. The Brown lab also develops strategies and assays for early detection and diagnosis of cancer.

  • Douglas L. Brutlag

    Douglas L. Brutlag

    Professor of Biochemistry, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy primary interest is to understand the flow of information from the genome to the phenotype of an organism. This interest includes predicting the structure and function of genes and proteins from their primary sequence, predicting function from structure simulating protein folding and ligand docking, and predicitng disease from genome variations. These goals are the same as the goals of molecular biology, however, we use primarily computational approaches.

  • Gilbert Chu

    Gilbert Chu

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur laboratory seeks to understand how cells repair DNA damage. We currently focus on how non-homologous end joining proteins assemble on DNA ends to juxtapose them for repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    We are collaborating in the development of a point-of-care device to measure ammonia from a drop of blood. The device will facilitate diagnosis and management of urea cycle defects, liver disease, and chemobrain due to elevated ammonia.

  • James Ferrell

    James Ferrell

    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab has two main goals: to understand mitotic regulation and to understand the systems-level logic of simple signaling circuits. We often make use of Xenopus laevis oocytes, eggs, and cell-free extracts for both sorts of study. We also carry out single-cell fluorescence imaging studies on mammalian cell lines. Our experimental work is complemented by computational and theoretical studies aimed at identifying the design principles of regulatory circuits.

  • Pehr Harbury

    Pehr Harbury

    Associate Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsScientific breakthroughs often come on the heels of technological advances; advances that expose hidden truths of nature, and provide tools for engineering the world around us. Examples include the telescope (heliocentrism), the Michelson interferometer (relativity) and recombinant DNA (molecular evolution). Our lab explores innovative experimental approaches to problems in molecular biochemistry, focusing on technologies with the potential for broad impact.