School of Medicine


Showing 1-41 of 41 Results

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Mihaela Damian MD

    Mihaela Damian MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Pharmacology
    Sedation
    Solid Organ Transplantation

  • Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Dermatology

    BioDr. Daneshjou studied Bioengineering at Rice University before matriculating to Stanford School of Medicine where she completed her MD and a PhD in Genetics with Dr. Russ Altman as part of the medical scientist training program. She completed dermatology residency at Stanford as part of the research track and completed a postdoc in Biomedical Data Science with Dr. James Zou. She currently is the assistant director of the Center of Excellence for Precision Heath & Pharmacogenomics, director of informatics for the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG), a founding member of the Translational AI in Dermatology (TRAIND) group, and a faculty affiliate of Human-centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) and the AI in Medicine and Imaging (AIMI) centers.

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.

  • Jenna Davis

    Jenna Davis

    Associate Dean for Integrative Initiatives in Institutes and International Partnerships, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, at the Stanford Doerr School of Sustainability and Higgins-Magid Senior Fellow at the Woods Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsProfessor Davis’ research and teaching deals broadly with the role that water plays in promoting public health and economic development, with particular emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Her group conducts applied research that utilizes theory and analytical methods from public and environmental health, engineering, microeconomics, and planning. They have conducted field research in more than 20 countries, most recently including Zambia, Bangladesh, and Kenya.

  • Kara Davis

    Kara Davis

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsChildhood cancers can be considered aberrations of normal tissue development. We are interested in understanding childhood cancers through the lens of normal development. Further, individual tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, not all cells being equal in their ability to respond to treatment or to repopulate a tumor. Thus, we take single cell approach to determine populations of clinical relevance.

  • Mark M. Davis

    Mark M. Davis

    Director, Stanford Institute for Immunity, Transplantation and Infection and the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Ronald W. Davis

    Ronald W. Davis

    Professor of Biochemistry and of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe are using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Human to conduct whole genome analysis projects. The yeast genome sequence has approximately 6,000 genes. We have made a set of haploid and diploid strains (21,000) containing a complete deletion of each gene. In order to facilitate whole genome analysis each deletion is molecularly tagged with a unique 20-mer DNA sequence. This sequence acts as a molecular bar code and makes it easy to identify the presence of each deletion.

  • John W. Day, MD, PhD

    John W. Day, MD, PhD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology), of Pediatrics (Genetics) and, by courtesy, of Pathology
    On Partial Leave from 03/15/2024 To 06/15/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur Neuromuscular Division coordinates a comprehensive effort to conquer peripheral nerve and muscle disorders, including the muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders, neuromuscular junction abnormalities, and peripheral neuropathies. With patients and families foremost in mind, we have had success defining and combating these diseases, with research focused on identifying genetic causes, developing novel treatment, and maximizing patient function by optimizing current management.

  • Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Vinicio de Jesus Perez MD

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy work is aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). I am interested in understanding the role that the BMP and Wnt pathways play in regulating functions of pulmonary endothelial and smooth muscle cells both in health and disease.

  • Luis de Lecea

    Luis de Lecea

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical and Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab uses molecular, optogenetic, anatomical and behavioral methods to identify and manipulate the neuronal circuits underlying brain arousal, with particular attention to sleep and wakefulness transitions. We are also interested in the changes that occur in neuronal circuits in conditions of hyperarousal such as stress and drug addiction.

  • Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Cornelia L. Dekker, M.D.

    Professor (Research) of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases), Emerita

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Stanford-LPCH Vaccine Program provides an infrastructure for conducting clinical studies of vaccines in children and adults. We conduct immunology studies of seasonal influenza vaccines in twins, in a longitudinal cohort of young and elderly adults and studies of various vaccine candidates for NIH and industry. Additionally, we were a CDC Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment site for 10 years working on safety issues concerning licensed vaccines.

  • Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Scott L. Delp, Ph.D.

    Director, Wu Tsai Human Performance Alliance at Stanford, James H. Clark Professor in the School of Engineering, Professor of Bioengineering, of Mechanical Engineering and, by courtesy, of Orthopaedic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsExperimental and computational approaches to study human movement. Development of biomechanical models to analyze muscle function, study movement abnormalities, design medical products, and guide surgery. Imaging and health technology development. Discovering the principles of peak performance to advance human health. Human performance research. Wearable technologies, video motion capture, and machine learning to enable large-scale analysis.

  • Utkan Demirci

    Utkan Demirci

    Professor of Radiology (Canary Cancer Center) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 02/26/2024 To 02/25/2025

    BioUtkan Demirci is a tenured professor in the School of Medicine at Stanford University and serves as the Interim Division Chief and Director of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection in the Department of Radiology. Prior to Stanford, he was an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and a faculty member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences and Technology division.

    Professor Demirci received his PhD from Stanford University in Electrical Engineering in 2005 and holds M.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering, and in Management Science and Engineering. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed journal articles, 24 book chapters, 7 edited books, and several hundred abstracts and proceedings, as well as having over 25 patents and disclosures pending or granted. He has mentored and trained hundreds of successful scientists, entrepreneurs and academicians and fostered research and industry collaborations around the world. Dr. Demirci was awarded the NSF CAREER Award, and IEEE EMBS Early Career Award. He is currently a fellow of the the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE, 2017), and Distinguished Investigator of the Academy for Radiology and Biomedical Imaging Research and serves as an editorial board member for a number of peer-reviewed journals.

    The BAMM Lab group focuses on developing innovative extracellular vesicle isolation tools, point-of-care technologies and creating microfluidic platforms for early cancer detection with broad applications to multiple diseases including infertility and HIV. Dr. Demirci’s lab has collaborated with over 50 research groups and industry partners around the world. His seminal work in microfluidics has led to the development of innovative FDA-approved platform technologies in medicine and many of his inventions have been industry licensed. He holds several FDA-approved and CE-marked technologies that have been widely used by fertility clinics with assisted reproductive technologies leading to over thousands of live births globally and in the US.

    Dr. Demirci is a serial academic entrepreneur and co-founder of DxNow, Zymot, Levitas Bio, Mercury Biosciences and Koek Biotech and serves as an advisor, consultant and/or board member to some early stage companies and investment groups.

  • Manisha Desai (She/Her/Hers)

    Manisha Desai (She/Her/Hers)

    Kim and Ping Li Professor, Professor (Research) of Medicine (Quantitative Sciences Unit), of Biomedical Data Science and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Desai is the Director of the Quantitative Sciences Unit. She is interested in the application of biostatistical methods to all areas of medicine including oncology, nephrology, and endocrinology. She works on methods for the analysis of epidemiologic studies, clinical trials, and studies with missing observations.

  • Tushar Desai

    Tushar Desai

    Professor of Medicine (Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBasic and translational research in lung stem cell biology, cancer, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, and acute lung injury/ARDS. Upper airway stem cell CRISPR gene correction followed by autologous stem cell transplantation to treat Cystic fibrosis. Using lung organoids and precision cut lung slice cultures of mouse and human lungs to study molecular regulation of lung stem cells. Using transgenic mice to visualize Wnt protein transmission from niche cell to stem cell in vivo.

  • Gurpreet Singh Dhillon

    Gurpreet Singh Dhillon

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Pediatrics - Cardiology

    BioResearch interest in pediatric resuscitation science, with the goal of improving outcomes for children with heart disease experiencing cardiac arrest.

  • Chitra Dinakar

    Chitra Dinakar

    Member, Maternal & Child Health Research Institute (MCHRI)

    BioDr. Chitra Dinakar is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at Stanford University and the Clinical Chief of Allergy, Asthma and Immunodeficiency, Stanford Health Care. Prior to coming to Stanford she was a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City; and Director, Food Allergy Center at Children’s Mercy Hospital, Kansas City. She completed her fellowship in Allergy/Immunology (A/I) at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio, and her residency in pediatrics at Case Western Reserve University/Metrohealth Medical Center, Ohio. She completed her medical school and pediatric residency training at JIPMER, a premier medical institution in India.

    Having had the benefit of experiencing health care in diverse settings, Dr. Dinakar is empowered with the perspective, and driven by the passion, to improve health care across the globe. Her interests and expertise include food allergies, asthma, and health care disparities, delivery, and outcomes. She serves on the editorial boards of four reputed Allergy/Immunology journals and the World Allergy Organization Web Editorial Board. She has been involved in more than 50 multi-centered, clinical trials relating to asthma and food allergies, and has over 100 peer-reviewed publications and research abstracts in prestigious journals.

    One of her current research interests is ASIAd (Allergy/Asthma Studies in Individuals of Asian Descent), that explores the Care, Cure and Prevention of Allergic conditions in individuals of Asian lineage. As part of the exploration she is collaborating with researchers from Northwestern University to study the unique food allergens prevalent in the South Asian population (please click on link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SouthAsianFoodAllergySurvey). She hopes to address the significant knowledge gaps and unmet needs regarding diagnostic, treatment and preventive options available to this demographic group. Another current area of focus is development of tools to improve patient outcomes in food allergic disorders; she recently received a grant to support phase I of the project. Her other ongoing research interests include the health impact of e-cigarettes, clinical intervention trials and outcomes research in asthma, and use of e-health to improve patient outcomes.

    She is an invited speaker at national and international allergy conferences, and serves on the Board of Directors at national A/I organizations [American Board of A/I; American Academy of A/I; Joint A/I Task Force on Practice Parameters; American Academy of Pediatrics Section of A/I]. Dr. Dinakar’s honors include the following national awards: ”Distinguished Fellow", "Woman in Allergy", “Acellus Teacher of the Year”, "Award of Excellence", and an honorary “Kentucky Colonel” awarded by the Governor of Kentucky, “Best Doctors in America”, and “Kansas City SuperDocs”.

  • Jun Ding

    Jun Ding

    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and of Neurology
    On Leave from 02/01/2024 To 07/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNeural circuits of movement control in health and movement disorders

  • Elizabeth DiRenzo, PhD

    Elizabeth DiRenzo, PhD

    Associate Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Music

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Erickson DiRenzo's laboratory integrates research techniques from the basic and clinical sciences to improve the prevention and management of voice disorders.

  • Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Amy D. Dobberfuhl, MD, MS

    Assistant Professor of Urology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Dobberfuhl's current clinical practice includes: Pelvic Reconstruction, Neurourology, and Voiding Dysfunction.

  • Dylan Dodd

    Dylan Dodd

    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHarnessing the gut microbiome to treat human disease.

  • David Drover

    David Drover

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
    On Partial Leave from 05/01/2024 To 01/31/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsField of clinical pharmacology. This involves analysis of what the body does to a drug (pharmacokinetics) and how exactly a specific drug affects the body (pharmacodynamics). His research starts at the level of new drug development with detailed analysis of the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a medication.

  • Maurice L. Druzin

    Maurice L. Druzin

    Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Maternal Fetal Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics
    On Leave from 05/01/2024 To 05/31/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAntepartum and intrapartum fetal monitoring Prenatal diagnosis Medical complications of pregnancy, particularly: SLE, hypertension, diabetes, malignancy A.

  • Justin Du Bois

    Justin Du Bois

    Henry Dreyfus Professor of Chemistry and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    BioResearch and Scholarship

    Research in the Du Bois laboratory spans reaction methods development, natural product synthesis, and chemical biology, and draws on expertise in molecular design, molecular recognition, and physical organic chemistry. An outstanding goal of our program has been to develop C–H bond functionalization processes as general methods for organic chemistry, and to demonstrate how such tools can impact the logic of chemical synthesis. A second area of interest focuses on the role of ion channels in electrical conduction and the specific involvement of channel subtypes in the sensation of pain. This work is enabled in part through the advent of small molecule modulators of channel function.

    The Du Bois group has described new tactics for the selective conversion of saturated C–H to C–N and C–O bonds. These methods have general utility in synthesis, making possible the single-step incorporation of nitrogen and oxygen functional groups and thus simplifying the process of assembling complex molecules. To date, lab members have employed these versatile oxidation technologies to prepare natural products that include manzacidin A and C, agelastatin, tetrodotoxin, and saxitoxin. Detailed mechanistic studies of metal-catalyzed C–H functionalization reactions are performed in parallel with process development and chemical synthesis. These efforts ultimately give way to advances in catalyst design. A long-standing goal of this program is to identify robust catalyst systems that afford absolute control of reaction selectivity.

    In a second program area, the Du Bois group is exploring voltage-gated ion channel structure and function using the tools of chemistry in combination with those of molecular biology, electrophysiology, microscopy and mass spectrometry. Much of this work has focused on studies of eukaryotic Na and Cl ion channels. The Du Bois lab is interested in understanding the biochemical mechanisms that underlie channel subtype regulation and how such processes may be altered following nerve injury. Small molecule toxins serve as lead compounds for the design of isoform-selective channel modulators, affinity reagents, and fluorescence imaging probes. Access to toxins and modified forms thereof (including saxitoxin, gonyautoxin, batrachotoxin, and veratridine) through de novo synthesis drives studies to elucidate toxin-receptor interactions and to develop new pharmacologic tools to study ion channel function in primary cells and murine pain models.

  • Dawn Duane

    Dawn Duane

    Clinical Professor, Neurology
    Clinical Professor (By courtesy), Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a general pediatric neurologist. My interest is in clinical diagnosis and treatment of common neurologic diseases in pediatric patients and teaching feature doctors, neurologists and pediatric neurologists about pediatric neurology.

  • Anne Dubin

    Anne Dubin

    Endowed Professor of Pediatric Cardiology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArrhythmia management in pediatric heart failure, especially resynchronization therapy in congenital heart disease,Radio frequency catheter ablation of pediatric arrhythmias,

  • Alexander Dunn

    Alexander Dunn

    Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering
    On Partial Leave from 04/01/2024 To 06/30/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab is deeply interested in uncovering the physical principles that underlie the construction of complex, multicellular animal life.

  • James Dunn

    James Dunn

    Professor of Surgery (Pediatric Surgery) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsIntestinal lengthening for short bowel syndrome
    Intestinal stem cell therapy for intestinal failure
    Skin derived precursor cell therapy for enteric neuromuscular dysfunction
    Intestinal tissue engineering

  • Ram S Duriseti

    Ram S Duriseti

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioRam's Doctoral background and academic interests are in the computational modeling of complex decisions, algorithm design and implementation, and data driven decision making. Outside of clinical work, his main competencies in this regard are software development, algorithm design and implementation, cost-effectiveness analysis, and decision analysis through computational models. He has also collaborated with industry to create and deploy operation specific software involving statistical computing and reasoning under inference. He has been practicing clinical Emergency Medicine in both community and academic settings for over 20 years.

    https://www.shiftgen.com/about
    https://www.linkedin.com/in/ram-duriseti-991614/

  • Gozde Durmus

    Gozde Durmus

    Assistant Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Durmus' research focuses on applying micro/nano-technologies to investigate cellular heterogeneity for single-cell analysis and personalized medicine. At Stanford, she is developing platform technologies for sorting and monitoring cells at the single-cell resolution. This magnetic levitation-based technology is used for wide range of applications in medicine, such as, label-free detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from blood; high-throughput drug screening; and rapid detection and monitoring of antibiotic resistance in real-time. During her PhD, she has engineered nanoparticles and nanostructured surfaces to decrease antibiotic-resistant infections.