School of Medicine


Showing 1-50 of 208 Results

  • Genevieve D'Souza

    Genevieve D'Souza

    Clinical Associate Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioGenevieve D’souza MD, FASA is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Pediatric Anesthesia division of the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine at Stanford University. She is a Board-certified Pediatric Anesthesiologist , Fellowship trained Pediatric Pain Doctor, and trained in Medical Acupuncture.
    She is a practicing Chronic Pediatric Pain Doctor at Stanford Medicine Children's Health and is also part of the Acute Pain Service. She is the Interim Medical Director of the Pediatric Pain Division. She is also the Director of the Pediatric Anesthesia Resource Center at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital.
    She is also the Senior Editor for the Visual Pearl Series For the Society of Pediatric Pain Medicine and on the Board of Directors for Society of Pediatric Pain Medicine.

  • Peter D'Souza

    Peter D'Souza

    Clinical Associate Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. D'Souza's clinical practice is in Emergency Medicine at Stanford Hospital. He has a strong interest in Emergency Medical Services and pre-hospital care. He currently serves as medical advisor for the Palo Alto Fire Department, Mountain View Fire Department, and Santa Clara Fire Department. He serves as the Department Liaison to the Trauma Service. He previously served as Medical Director for Stanford Life Flight and course director for the Stanford EMT Training Program. His research interests include treatment of neurological emergencies and variability in trauma care.

  • Saurabh Dahiya, MD, FACP

    Saurabh Dahiya, MD, FACP

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Dahiya is a cancer specialist with board certification in internal medicine, hematology, and medical oncology. He is an Associate Professor at Stanford University School of Medicine and Clinical Director of Cancer Cell Therapy in the Stanford BMT and Cell Therapy division.

    Dr. Dahiya strives to support each patient with a personalized and compassionate care plan that optimizes healing and quality of life.

    Prior to joining Stanford, Dr. Dahiya was an associate professor of medicine at the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where he developed the Cellular Immunotherapy Program and served as the Director of Cellular Immunotherapy in leukemia and lymphoma.

    Dr. Dahiya’s research focuses on cellular immunotherapy for hematologic malignancies. He has led and participated in several investigator-initiated studies and sponsored clinical trials with cell therapies (CAR-T, CAR-NK, TCR-T) for hematologic malignancies. His research group is also involved in various translational research activities for the standard of care and research CAR-T therapy. Dr. Dahiya’s group was the first group to show the role of fibrinogen in Neurotoxicity associated with CAR-T therapy. They showed vascular injury as manifested by high fibrinogen levels is associated with higher Neurotoxicity in patients who receive CAR-T therapy. More recently his group led a novel study of assessing the immune response to COVID-19 disease. They evaluated the immune response in critically ill and non-critically ill patients hospitalized with COVID-19 disease and showed a differential immune response between the groups. Dr. Dahiya’s group also showed and established poor immunogenicity of COVID-19 vaccines in CART recipients. As such, passive immunity and other strategies to address the issues of immunogenicity are being explored.

    He has published more than 50 articles in peer-reviewed journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of Clinical Oncology, Blood, Blood Advances, Lancet, Leukemia Research, Neuro-Oncology, and many more. He reviews article submissions for the journals Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology, Thoracic Cancer, and Blood. He serves as the hematology lead editor for the journal Critical Reviews in Oncology and Hematology.

    He has presented his research findings at conferences such as the annual meetings of the American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, and American Society for Transplantation and Cell Therapy.

    Dr. Dahiya is a member of the American Society of Hematology and the American Society of Transplantation and Cell Therapy.

  • Gary Dahl

    Gary Dahl

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for childhood cancer, overcoming multidrug resistance in leukemia and solid tumors, biology and treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, early detection of central nervous system leukemia by measuring growth, factor binding proteins.

  • Jeremy Dahl

    Jeremy Dahl

    Associate Professor of Radiology (Pediatric Radiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUltrasonic beamforming, imaging methods, systems, and devices.

  • Katharine Dahl

    Katharine Dahl

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Kate Dahl specializes in working with children and families who are affected by medical illness. She has practiced at Stanford since 2014 and is the primary pediatric psychologist for the dialysis, kidney transplant, and liver transplant medical teams. Her work often focuses on adjustment to new diagnosis, coping with illness and treatment, and adherence to the medical regimen. She is particularly interested in the experience of adolescents with chronic medical conditions and leads groups for teens who have received kidney and liver transplants.

  • Erpeng Dai

    Erpeng Dai

    Instructor, Radiology

    BioDr. Erpeng Dai's research interest is focused on advanced neuro MRI technique development and application. Previously, he has developed a series of novel techniques for high-resolution and fast diffusion MRI (dMRI). Currently, he is mainly working on distortion-free dMRI, advanced diffusion encoding, and brain microstructure and connectivity studies.

  • Hongjie Dai

    Hongjie Dai

    The J.G. Jackson and C.J. Wood Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus

    BioProfessor Dai’s research spans chemistry, physics, and materials and biomedical sciences, leading to materials with properties useful in electronics, energy storage and biomedicine. Recent developments include near-infrared-II fluorescence imaging, ultra-sensitive diagnostic assays, a fast-charging aluminum battery and inexpensive electrocatalysts that split water into oxygen and hydrogen fuels.

    Born in 1966 in Shaoyang, China, Hongjie Dai began his formal studies in physics at Tsinghua U. (B.S. 1989) and applied sciences at Columbia U. (M.S. 1991). He obtained his Ph.D. from Harvard U and performed postdoctoral research with Dr. Richard Smalley. He joined the Stanford faculty in 1997, and in 2007 was named Jackson–Wood Professor of Chemistry. Among many awards, he has been recognized with the ACS Pure Chemistry Award, APS McGroddy Prize for New Materials, Julius Springer Prize for Applied Physics and Materials Research Society Mid-Career Award. He has been elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Academy of Sciences (NAS), National Academy of Medicine (NAM) and Foreign Member of Chinese Academy of Sciences.

    The Dai Laboratory has advanced the synthesis and basic understanding of carbon nanomaterials and applications in nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, energy storage and electrocatalysis.

    Nanomaterials
    The Dai Lab pioneered some of the now-widespread uses of chemical vapor deposition for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth, including vertically aligned nanotubes and patterned growth of single-walled CNTs on wafer substrates, facilitating fundamental studies of their intrinsic properties. The group developed the synthesis of graphene nanoribbons, and of nanocrystals and nanoparticles on CNTs and graphene with controlled degrees of oxidation, producing a class of strongly coupled hybrid materials with advanced properties for electrochemistry, electrocatalysis and photocatalysis. The lab’s synthesis of a novel plasmonic gold film has enhanced near-infrared fluorescence up to 100-fold, enabling ultra-sensitive assays of disease biomarkers.

    Nanoscale Physics and Electronics
    High quality nanotubes from his group’s synthesis are widely used to investigate the electrical, mechanical, optical, electro-mechanical and thermal properties of quasi-one-dimensional systems. Lab members have studied ballistic electron transport in nanotubes and demonstrated nanotube-based nanosensors, Pd ohmic contacts and ballistic field effect transistors with integrated high-kappa dielectrics.

    Nanomedicine and NIR-II Imaging
    Advancing biological research with CNTs and nano-graphene, group members have developed π–π stacking non-covalent functionalization chemistry, molecular cellular delivery (drugs, proteins and siRNA), in vivo anti-cancer drug delivery and in vivo photothermal ablation of cancer. Using nanotubes as novel contrast agents, lab collaborations have developed in vitro and in vivo Raman, photoacoustic and fluorescence imaging. Lab members have exploited the physics of reduced light scattering in the near-infrared-II (1000-1700nm) window and pioneered NIR-II fluorescence imaging to increase tissue penetration depth in vivo. Video-rate NIR-II imaging can measure blood flow in single vessels in real time. The lab has developed novel NIR-II fluorescence agents, including CNTs, quantum dots, conjugated polymers and small organic dyes with promise for clinical translation.

    Electrocatalysis and Batteries
    The Dai group’s nanocarbon–inorganic particle hybrid materials have opened new directions in energy research. Advances include electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and water splitting catalysts including NiFe layered-double-hydroxide for oxygen evolution. Recently, the group also demonstrated an aluminum ion battery with graphite cathodes and ionic liquid electrolytes, a substantial breakthrough in battery science.

  • Xianjin Dai, PhD, DABR

    Xianjin Dai, PhD, DABR

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiation Oncology - Radiation Physics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAI in Medicine
    Biomedical Physics
    Multimodal Imaging
    Medical Device
    Biomedical Optics
    Photoacoustic/Thermoacoustic Imaging
    Optical Imaging (Microscopy, OCT, DOT, FMT)
    Ultrasound Imaging

  • Sudeb C. Dalai

    Sudeb C. Dalai

    Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Infectious Diseases

    BioDr. Sudeb Dalai, MD PhD is an Infectious Disease Physician at Stanford University School of Medicine and the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Currently a Clinical Assistant Professor (Teaching) at Stanford, he has taught courses and conducted research in academia/industry for over 18 years.

    Dr. Dalai completed his undergraduate degree at MIT, MD and MS at Stanford, PhD in Epidemiology at UC Berkeley School of Public Health, Internal Medicine Residency at UCSD, and Fellowship in Infectious Diseases at Stanford. He has received numerous teaching and leadership awards and research grants and has co-authored multiple peer-reviewed publications. His work has been supported by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Paul and Daisy Soros Foundation, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Dalai is an internationally-invited speaker and has been featured in multiple media outlets including ABC, NBC, Good Morning America, US News & World Report, Buzzfeed, and The Huffington Post. In 2003 he was elected to the MIT Board of Trustees and in 2020 he was voted as a Board Member of the MIT Club of Northern California.

  • Heike Daldrup-Link

    Heike Daldrup-Link

    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAs a physician-scientist involved in the care of pediatric patients and developing novel pediatric molecular imaging technologies, my goal is to link the fields of nanotechnology and medical imaging towards more efficient diagnoses and image-guided therapies. Our research team develops novel imaging techniques for improved cancer diagnosis, for image-guided-drug delivery and for in vivo monitoring of cell therapies in children and young adults.

  • Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Ronald L. Dalman MD

    Dr. Walter C. Chidester Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsVascular biology, arterial remodeling, aneurysm development; innovative treatment strategies for AAA, animal models of arterial disease, arterial remodeling and flow changes in spinal cord injury, genetic regulation of arterial aneurysm formation

  • Mihaela Damian MD

    Mihaela Damian MD

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Critical Care

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical Pharmacology
    Sedation
    Solid Organ Transplantation

  • Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS

    Edward J. Damrose, MD, FACS

    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS) and, by courtesy, of Anesthesiology, Perioperative & Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdvanced MRI imaging for laryngeal cancer and swallowing disorders; applications of robotics in microlaryngeal surgery; high speed digital imaging of vocal fold vibration; the effects of hormones and anabolic steroids on vocal function.

  • Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Francesco Nandkumar Dandekar

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Dandekar is the Associate Director of Sports Psychiatry and a Clinical Assistant Professor at Stanford University. After graduating summa cum laude from the University of Southern California with a B.S. in Biomedical Engineering, he earned a Regents Scholarship to complete his M.D. at UC San Diego, where he received the American Academy of Neurology’s Prize for Excellence. During his residency and fellowship at Stanford, Dr. Dandekar provided care to a variety of patients utilizing a combination of medication management, psychotherapy, and lifestyle changes (sleep, nutrition, exercise, recovery). Teamed with Clinical Professor Dr. Douglas Noordsy, he helped to incorporate psychiatric services into Stanford's sports psychology program, and continues to see elite athletes as part of the Stanford Sports Psychiatry Clinic. He also specializes in treating physicians, and sees many residents, fellows, and attendings in his private practice. In his free time, he enjoys playing tennis, chess, and guitar.

  • Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Roxana Daneshjou, MD, PhD

    Assistant Professor of Biomedical Data Science and of Dermatology

    BioDr. Daneshjou studied Bioengineering at Rice University before matriculating to Stanford School of Medicine where she completed her MD and a PhD in Genetics with Dr. Russ Altman as part of the medical scientist training program. She completed dermatology residency at Stanford as part of the research track and completed a postdoc in Biomedical Data Science with Dr. James Zou. She currently is the assistant director of the Center of Excellence for Precision Heath & Pharmacogenomics, director of informatics for the Stanford Skin Innovation and Interventional Research Group (SIIRG), a founding member of the Translational AI in Dermatology (TRAIND) group, and a faculty affiliate of Human-centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) and the AI in Medicine and Imaging (AIMI) centers.

  • Brian Dang

    Brian Dang

    Clinical Scholar, Radiology
    Fellow in Radiology

    BioBrian Dang grew up in Rosemead, California. He attended college at the University of California, Irvine, where he majored in Biological Sciences. Brian received his MD degree from Saint Louis University School of Medicine.

  • Linh T Dang

    Linh T Dang

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Educational Programs and Services (EPS)

    BioDr. Linh Dang enjoys practicing full-spectrum primary care. She has a special interest in pediatric and women's health with a particular focus on preventative care.

    As a Bay Area native growing up in East San Jose, Dr. Dang especially enjoys working with a diverse population and the most vulnerable and underserved of the community.

  • Bruce Daniel

    Bruce Daniel

    Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) and, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. MRI of Breast Cancer, particularly new techniques. Currently being explored are techniques including ultra high spatial resolution MRI and contrast-agent-free detection of breast tumors.

    2. MRI-guided interventions, especially MRI-compatible remote manipulation and haptics

    3. Medical Mixed Reality. Currently being explored are methods of fusing patients and their images to potentially improve breast conserving surgery, and other conditions.

  • Kay Daniels

    Kay Daniels

    Clinical Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology - Maternal Fetal Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSpecial interest in :
    1.Ob simulation as a teaching and training tool
    2. Disaster planning for OB units
    3. Global women's health

  • Kyle Gabriel Daniels

    Kyle Gabriel Daniels

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    BioKyle obtained his BS in Biochemistry from the University of Maryland College Park in 2010, conducting undergraduate research with Dr. Dorothy Beckett, PhD. He obtained his PhD in Biochemistry with a certificate in Structural Biology and Biophysics. His dissertation is titled "Kinetics of Coupled Binding and Conformational Change in Proteins and RNA" and was completed in the laboratory of Dr. Terrence G. Oas, PhD. Kyle performed postdoctoral training with Dr. Wendell A. Lim, PhD at UCSF studying how CAR T cell phenotype is encoded by modular signaling motifs within chimeric antigen receptors.

    Kyle's lab is interested in harnessing the principles of modularity to engineer receptors and gene circuits to control cell functions.

    The lab will use synthetic biology, medium- and high-throughput screens, and machine learning to: (1) Engineer immune cells to achieve robust and durable responses against various cancer targets, (2) Coordinate behavior of multiple engineered cell types in cancer, autoimmune disease, and payload delivery, (3) Control survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and immune cells, and (4) Explore principles of modularity related to engineering receptors and gene circuits in mammalian cells.

  • Bernard Dannenberg

    Bernard Dannenberg

    Clinical Professor, Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Pain Management and Sedation

  • Corinna Darian-Smith, PhD

    Corinna Darian-Smith, PhD

    Professor of Comparative Medicine
    On Leave from 06/01/2024 To 01/31/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy lab looks at the organization and function of central neural pathways that underlie directed manual behavior. We are specifically interested in how these pathways adapt following injury, and use a combination of approaches in monkeys to identify mechanisms mediating neural reorganization and behavioral recovery.

  • Gary Darmstadt

    Gary Darmstadt

    Professor (Teaching) of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and, by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have extensive experience in the development of global health innovations and in working to test and scale-up health interventions. At Stanford University, I am playing a leading role in developing global women and children’s health research and educational programs, including the establishment of a Global Center for Gender Equality at Stanford University. My research focuses on advancing child health and development in low resource settings and advancing gender equality and health globally, and includes several applications of artificial intelligence. Before joining Stanford, I was Senior Fellow at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), where I led the development of initiatives to address gender inequalities and empower women and girls. Prior to this role, I served as the BMGF Director of Family Health, leading strategy development and implementation across maternal, newborn and child health, nutrition, and family planning. In this role, I was responsible for investments ranging from scientific discovery to intervention development and delivery of interventions at scale. I worked closely with the Discovery team to shape discovery and development investments and was a co-founder of the Saving Lives at Birth Development Grand Challenge, the Putting Women and Girls at the Center of Development Grand Challenge, and the Healthy Birth, Growth and Development initiative. Based on these experiences, I understand how to identify knowledge gaps and generate evidence of impact for new interventions, and how to utilize evidence to influence the policy dialogue leading to programmatic adoption and scale-up of interventions in low income settings. As Director of Family Health, I also co-led the development and implementation of the BMGF global health strategy for India, which cuts across multiple health and development sectors. Before joining BMGF, I was Associate Professor and Founding Director of the International Center for Advancing Neonatal Health in the Department of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. I led the development of newborn health research, including numerous facility- and community-based maternal and child health research trials. Before joining Johns Hopkins, I was Senior Research Advisor for the $50M Saving Newborn Lives program of Save the Children-US, where I led the development and implementation of the global research strategy for newborn health and survival.

  • Beth Darnall

    Beth Darnall

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine (Adult Pain) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry & Psychology (Adult))

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab is dedicated to better characterizing and treating pain with patient-centered solutions. We specialize in the conduct of large-scale acute and chronic pain clinical trials that aim to (1) expand and scale access to behavioral medicine via digital and brief treatments; (2) reduce opioid risks via reduction for some and improved opioid access for others; (3) equip healthcare providers with brief behavioral medicine interventions to optimize health outcomes.

  • Millie Das

    Millie Das

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Das specializes in the treatment of thoracic malignancies. She sees and treats patients both at the Stanford Cancer Center and at the Palo Alto VA Hospital. She is Chief of Oncology at the Palo Alto VA and is an active member of the VA national Lung Cancer Working Group and Lung Cancer Precision Oncology Program. In 2023, she was elected President the Association of Northern California Oncologists (ANCO), where she displays her passion for patient advocacy and also for clinician education by helping to organize Bay Area focused continuing medical education programs. She is the VA site director for the Stanford fellowship program and leads the VA thoracic tumor board on a biweekly basis. She has a strong interest in clinical research, serving as a principal investigator for multiple clinical and translational studies at the Palo Alto VA, and also as a co-investigator on all of the lung cancer trials at Stanford. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, traveling, and running.

  • Rhiju Das

    Rhiju Das

    Professor of Biochemistry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab seeks an agile and predictive understanding of how nucleic acids and proteins code for information processing in living systems. We develop new computational & chemical tools to enable the precise modeling, regulation, and design of RNA and RNA/protein machines.

  • Smita Das

    Smita Das

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioSmita Das, MD, PhD, MPH is Board Certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Psychiatry and Addiction Medicine. Dr. Das studied Chemistry and Statistics at Stanford, completed her Masters in Public Health at Dartmouth College, and then completed her MD/PhD in Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. She completed psychiatry residency and was chief resident at Stanford followed by an addiction psychiatry fellowship at UCSF. She has over 2 decades of experience in research in healthcare quality and addiction. Dr. Das is chair of the APA Council on Addiction Psychiatry and has been a member for a over a decade. She has been a leader in the Northern California Psychiatric Society since 2012 and is a Past President of the APA District Branch. Prior to her position as Medical Director of Psychiatry at Lyra Health, Dr. Das was Director of Addiction Treatment Services at the Palo Alto VA. In addition to her work at Lyra, Dr. Das practices in addictions at Stanford School of Medicine where she is a Clinical Associate Professor.

  • Debadutta (Dev) Dash, MD, MPH

    Debadutta (Dev) Dash, MD, MPH

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Emergency Medicine

    BioDr. Dash is an emergency medicine physician. He delivers care in the Stanford Health Care level 1 trauma center. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    He received fellowship training in clinical informatics at Stanford Health Care. He earned a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from Harvard University.

    His research interests include computer vision and natural language processing. He is also interested in quality assurance and quality improvement in digital health initiatives.

    Other research projects of Dr. Dash include development of an image classification algorithm that helps predict hypoxic outcomes. He also worked on the development of a hardware and software system designed to provide real-time feedback about cardiac function at the patient’s bedside.

    Dr. Dash was vice president of the American Medical Informatics Association Clinical Fellows while completing his fellowship. He was also a post-doctoral research fellow at the Stanford University Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine & Imaging.

    He is a member of the American College of Emergency Physicians and American Academy of Emergency Medicine.

    He speaks English and Oriya fluently. He also speaks, reads, and writes Japanese and Spanish with intermediate competence.

    His interests outside of patient care include piano, computer programming, sustainable energy projects, and cooking multi-course East Asian meals.

  • Rajesh Dash, MD PhD;      Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Rajesh Dash, MD PhD; Director of SSATHI & CardioClick

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have two research areas:
    1) Heart disease in South Asians - genetic, metabolic, & behavioral underpinnings of an aggressive phenotype.

    2) Imaging cell injury & recovery in the heart. Using Cardiac MRI to visualize signals of early injury and facilitating preventive medical therapy. Optimizing new imaging methods for viable cells to delineate live heart cells or transplanted stem cells.

  • Laura M.K. Dassama

    Laura M.K. Dassama

    Assistant Professor of Chemistry and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioLaura Dassama is a chemical biologist who uses principles from chemistry and physics to understand complex biological phenomena, and to leverage that understanding for the modulation of biological processes. Her current research focuses on deciphering the molecular recognition mechanisms of multidrug transporters implicated in drug resistance, rational engineering and repurposing of natural products, and control of transcription factors relevant to sickle cell disease.

  • Tami Daugherty

    Tami Daugherty

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Daugherty is a transplant Hepatologist with full-time clinical responsibilities. She is particularly interested in the natural course and management of recurrent Hepatitis C after liver transplant, and the effect of immunosuppression on HCV recurrence.

  • Reinhold Dauskardt

    Reinhold Dauskardt

    Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the School of Engineering

    BioDauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

  • Guido A. Davidzon

    Guido A. Davidzon

    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    BioDr. Guido A. Davidzon is a physician-scientist board-certified in Nuclear Medicine. He is an attending physician in Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care. He graduated with honors from medical school in Argentina and completed an internship at Yale University New-Haven Hospital in Connecticut. He did his residency and was chief resident at Stanford Health Care. He completed a U.S. National Library of Medicine-supported Biomedical Informatics fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital with a Science Master at MIT.

    Dr. Davidzon is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Radiology at Stanford University. His clinical specialties include molecular probe-based early diagnostic imaging of cancer, coronary artery disease, and dementia, as well as targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy for cancer treatment.

    Dr. Davidzon is the Cardiac PET and SPECT program director and the acting Chair of the Radioactive Drug Research and Clinical Radiation Safety Committees. Guido steers clinical efforts in using PET to evaluate cognitive disorders and assess treatment response for patients receiving novel anti-amyloid therapies. He is an active member of the Artificial Intelligence Task Force at the SNMMI and leads research and translational efforts in artificial intelligence and nuclear medicine at Stanford. Dr. Davidzon is the immediate past President of the Northern California Chapter of the SNMMI.