School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 13 Results

  • John Eaton

    John Eaton

    Charles Lee Powell Foundation Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus

    BioEaton uses experiments and computational simulations to study the flow and heat transfer in complex turbulent flows, especially those relevant to turbomachinery, particle-laden flows, and separated flows, and to develop new techniques for precise control of gas and surface temperature during manufacturing processes.

  • Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Noelle Hanako Ebel

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Gastroenterology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent projects include:
    -indications for combined heart-liver transplantation
    -mitigating perioperative bleeding during cardiac surgery in children with Alagille syndrome
    -congenital heart disease and liver transplantation
    -subspecialty advocacy

  • Elizabeth Egan

    Elizabeth Egan

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMalaria is a parasitic disease transmitted by mosquitos that is a leading cause of childhood mortality globally. Public health efforts to control malaria have historically been hampered by the rapid development of drug resistance. The goal of our research is to understand the molecular determinants of critical host-pathogen interactions in malaria, with a focus on the erythrocyte host cell. Our long-term goal is to develop novel approaches to prevent or treat malaria and improve child health.

  • Shirit Einav

    Shirit Einav

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur basic research program focuses on understanding the roles of virus-host interactions in viral infection and disease pathogenesis via molecular and systems virology single cell approaches. This program is combined with translational efforts to apply this knowledge for the development of broad-spectrum host-centered antiviral approaches to combat emerging viral infections, including dengue, coronaviruses, encephalitic alphaviruses, and Ebola, and means to predict progression to severe disease.

  • Yasser El-Sayed, Professor

    Yasser El-Sayed, Professor

    Charles B. and Ann L. Johnson Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Neonatology) and of Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsHigh Risk Obstetrics: preterm labor, preeclampsia, medical and surgical complications of pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis and therapy

  • Edgar Engleman

    Edgar Engleman

    Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer, autoimmune disease, neurodegenerative disease and metabolic disease.

  • Jesse Engreitz

    Jesse Engreitz

    Assistant Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRegulatory elements in the human genome harbor thousands of genetic risk variants for common diseases and could reveal targets for therapeutics — if only we could map the complex regulatory wiring that connects 2 million regulatory elements with 21,000 genes in thousands of cell types in the human body.

    We combine experimental and computational genomics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics to assemble regulatory maps of the human genome and uncover biological mechanisms of disease.

  • Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Daniel Bruce Ennis

    Professor of Radiology (Veterans Affairs)

    BioDaniel Ennis {he/him} is a Professor in the Department of Radiology. As an MRI scientist for nearly twenty years, he has worked to develop advanced translational cardiovascular MRI methods for quantitatively assessing structure, function, flow, and remodeling in both adult and pediatric populations. He began his research career as a Ph.D. student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University during which time he formed an active collaboration with investigators in the Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NIH/NHLBI). Thereafter, he joined the Departments of Radiological Sciences and Cardiothoracic Surgery at Stanford University as a postdoc and began to establish an independent research program with an NIH K99/R00 award focused on “Myocardial Structure, Function, and Remodeling in Mitral Regurgitation.” For ten years he led a group of clinicians and scientists at UCLA working to develop and evaluate advanced cardiovascular MRI exams as PI of several NIH funded studies. In 2018 he returned to the Department of Radiology at Stanford University as faculty in the Radiological Sciences Lab to bolster programs in cardiovascular MRI. He is also the Director of Radiology Research for the Veterans Administration Palo Alto Health Care System where he oversees a growing radiology research program.