School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 14 Results

  • James Fann

    James Fann

    Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery) at the Stanford University Medical Center, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCardiac surgery education and simulation-based learning, coronary artery bypass surgery, cardiac valve disease

  • William Fearon, MD

    William Fearon, MD

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Fearon's general research interest is coronary physiology. In particular, he is investigating invasive methods for evaluating the coronary microcirculation. His research is currently funded by an NIH R01 Award.

  • Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Jeffrey A. Feinstein, MD, MPH

    Dunlevie Family Professor of Pulmonary Vascular Disease and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests include (1) computer simulation and modeling of cardiovascular physiology with specific attention paid to congenital heart disease and its treatment, (2) the evaluation and treatment of pulmonary hypertension/pulmonary vascular diseases, and (3) development and testing of medical devices/therapies for the treatment of congenital heart disease and pulmonary vascular diseases.

  • Katherine Ferrara

    Katherine Ferrara

    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy focus is image-guided drug and gene delivery and I am engaged in the design of imaging devices, molecularly-targeted imaging probes and engineered delivery vehicles, drawing upon my education in biology and imaging physics and more than 20 years of experience with the synthesis and labeling of therapeutic particles. My laboratory has unique resources for and substantial experience in synthetic chemistry and ultrasound, CT, MR and PET imaging.

  • Andrew Fire

    Andrew Fire

    George D. Smith Professor of Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics
    On Leave from 04/19/2022 To 05/18/2022

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study natural cellular mechanisms for adapting to genetic change. These include systems activated during normal development and those for detecting and responding to foreign or unwanted genetic activity. Underlying these studies are questions of how a cells can distinguish information as "self" versus "nonself" or "wanted" versus "unwanted".

  • Michael Fischbein

    Michael Fischbein

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Adult Cardiac Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular and genetic mechanisms of aortic aneurysm/dissection development. Molecular mechanisms of aneurysm formation in Marfan Syndrome. Clinical research interests include thoracic aortic diseases (aneurysms, dissections).

  • Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Peter Fitzgerald, MD, PhD

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (Cardiovascular), Emeritus

    BioDr. Peter Fitzgerald is the Director of the Center for Cardiovascular Technology and Director of the Cardiovascular Core Analysis Laboratory (CCAL) at Stanford University Medical School. He is an Interventional Cardiologist and has a PhD in Engineering. He is Professor in both the Departments of Medicine and Engineering (by courtesy) at Stanford. Presently, Dr. Fitzgerald’s laboratory includes 17 postdoctoral fellows and graduate engineering students focusing on state-of-the-art technologies in Cardiovascular Medicine. He has led or participated in over 175 clinical trials, published over 550 manuscripts/chapters, and lectures worldwide. He has trained over 150 post-docs in Engineering and Medicine in the past decade. In addition, he heads the Stanford/Asia MedTech innovation program.
    Dr. Fitzgerald has been principle/founder of twenty-one medical device companies in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has transitioned fourteen of these start-ups to large medical device companies. He serves on several boards of directors, advised dozens of medical device startups as well as multinational healthcare companies in the design and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic devices in the cardiovascular arena. In 2001, Peter was on the founding team of LVP Capital, a venture firm, focused on medical device and biotechnology start-ups in San Francisco. In 2009, he co-founded TriVentures, which is an incubator/venture fund for early stage medical technology in Israel.

  • Dominik Fleischmann

    Dominik Fleischmann

    Professor of Radiology (Cardiovascular Imaging)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsNon-invasive Cardiovascular Imaging
    Image Post-processing
    Contrast Medium Dynamics

  • Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Michael B. Fowler, MBBS, FRCP

    Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAdrenergic nervous system; beta-adrenergic function in, heart failure; drugs in heart failure.

  • Curtis Frank

    Curtis Frank

    W. M. Keck, Sr. Professor in Engineering, Emeritus

    BioThe properties of ultrathin polymer films are often different from their bulk counterparts. We use spin casting, Langmuir-Blodgett deposition, and surface grafting to fabricate ultrathin films in the range of 100 to 1000 Angstroms thick. Macromolecular amphiphiles are examined at the air-water interface by surface pressure, Brewster angle microscopy, and interfacial shear measurements and on solid substrates by atomic force microscopy, FTIR, and ellipsometry. A vapor-deposition-polymerization process has been developed for covalent grafting of poly(amino acids) from solid substrates. FTIR measurements permit study of secondary structures (right and left-handed alpha helices, parallel and anti-parallel beta sheets) as a function of temperature and environment.

    A broadly interdisciplinary collaboration has been established with the Department of Ophthalmology in the Stanford School of Medicine. We have designed and synthesized a fully interpenetrating network of two different hydrogel materials that have properties consistent with application as a substitute for the human cornea: high water swellability up to 85%,tensile strength comparable to the cornea, high glucose permeability comparable to the cornea, and sufficient tear strength to permit suturing. We have developed a technique for surface modification with adhesion peptides that allows binding of collagen and subsequent growth of epithelial cells. Broad questions on the relationships among molecular structure, processing protocol, and biomedical device application are being pursued.