School of Medicine


Showing 21-40 of 41 Results

  • Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert

    Professor of Health Policy

    BioJeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, PhD, is a Professor of Health Policy and a Core Faculty Member in the Centers for Health Policy and Primary Care and Outcomes Research. His research focuses on complex policy decisions surrounding the prevention and management of increasingly common, chronic diseases and the life course impact of exposure to their risk factors. In the context of both developing and developed countries including the US, India, China, and South Africa, he has examined chronic conditions including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer, tuberculosis, and hepatitis C and on risk factors including smoking, physical activity, obesity, malnutrition, and other diseases themselves. He combines simulation modeling methods and cost-effectiveness analyses with econometric approaches and behavioral economic studies to address these issues. Dr. Goldhaber-Fiebert graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College in 1997, with an A.B. in the History and Literature of America. After working as a software engineer and consultant, he conducted a year-long public health research program in Costa Rica with his wife in 2001. Winner of the Lee B. Lusted Prize for Outstanding Student Research from the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2006 and in 2008, he completed his PhD in Health Policy concentrating in Decision Science at Harvard University in 2008. He was elected as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making in 2011 and Secretary/Treasurer in 2021.

    Past and current research topics:

    - Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors: Randomized and observational studies in Costa Rica examining the impact of community-based lifestyle interventions and the relationship of gender, risk factors, and care utilization.

    -Cervical cancer: Model-based cost-effectiveness analyses and costing methods studies that examine policy issues relating to cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination in countries including the United States, Brazil, India, Kenya, Peru, South Africa, Tanzania, and Thailand.

    - Measles, haemophilus influenzae type b, and other childhood infectious diseases: Longitudinal regression analyses of country-level data from middle and upper income countries that examine the link between vaccination, sustained reductions in mortality, and evidence of herd immunity.

    - Patient adherence: Studies in both developing and developed countries of the costs and effectiveness of measures to increase successful adherence. Adherence to cervical cancer screening as well as to disease management programs targeting depression and obesity is examined from both a decision-analytic and a behavioral economics perspective.

    - Simulation modeling methods: Research examining model calibration and validation, the appropriate representation of uncertainty in projected outcomes, the use of models to examine plausible counterfactuals at the biological and epidemiological level, and the reflection of population and spatial heterogeneity.

  • Steven Goodman

    Steven Goodman

    Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health, of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) and, by courtesy, of Health Policy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am interested in issues relating to the representation and measurement of evidence in medical research, and determinants of the truth of medical findings, using a Bayesian framework. I also do work in evidence synthesis, comparative effectiveness research, and the ethics of clinical research.

  • Jason Gotlib

    Jason Gotlib

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research interests include phase I/II clinical trial evaluation of novel therapies for the following diseases:
    --Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS)
    --Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)
    --Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML)
    --Myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs) including:
    Hypereosinophilic syndrome
    Systemic mastocytosis
    BCR-ABL-negative MPDs

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

  • Dita Gratzinger

    Dita Gratzinger

    Professor of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI have research interests in the interaction of hematolymphoid neoplasia with the microenvironment. For example, I use a combination of immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and image analysis techniques to evaluate the mesenchymal stromal cell compartment in myelodysplastic syndrome (pre-leukemic bone marrow failure disorder). I also have interests in lymphoma vasculature and the tropism of lymphoma for specific types of vasculature.

  • Edward Graves

    Edward Graves

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of molecular imaging in radiation therapy, development of hypoxia and radiosensitivity imaging techniques, small animal image-guided conformal radiotherapy, image processing and analysis.

  • Nathanael S. Gray

    Nathanael S. Gray

    Krishnan-Shah Family Professor

    BioNathanael Gray is the Krishnan-Shah Family Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology at Stanford, Co-Director of Cancer Drug Discovery Co-Leader of the Cancer Therapeutics Research Program, Member of Chem-H, and Program Leader for Small Molecule Drug Discovery for the Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA). His research utilizes the tools of synthetic chemistry, protein biochemistry, and cancer biology to discover and validate new strategies for the inhibition of anti-cancer targets. Dr. Gray’s research has had broad impact in the areas of kinase inhibitor design and in circumventing drug resistance.
    Dr. Gray received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999 after receiving his BS degree with the highest honor award from the same institution in 1995. After completing his PhD, Dr. Gray was recruited to the newly established Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF) in San Diego, California. During his six year stay at GNF, Dr. Gray became the director of biological chemistry where he supervised a group of over fifty researchers integrating chemical, biological and pharmacological approaches towards the development of new experimental drugs. Some of the notable accomplishments of Dr. Gray’s team at GNF include: discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of wild-type and mutant forms of BCR-ABL which resulted in clinical development of ABL001; discovery of the first selective inhibitors of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase (ALK), an achievement that led to the development of now FDA-approved drugs such as ceritinib (LDK378) for the treatment of EML4-ALK expressing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); and discovery that sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) is the pharmacologically relevant target of the immunosuppressant drug Fingomilod (FTY720) followed by the development of Siponimod (BAF312), which is currently used for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.
    In 2006, Dr. Gray returned to academia as a faculty member at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School in Boston. There, he has established a discovery chemistry group that focuses on developing first-in-class inhibitors for newly emerging biological targets, including resistant alleles of existing targets, as well as inhibitors of well-validated targets, such as Her3 and RAS, that have previously been considered recalcitrant to small molecule drug development. Dr. Gray’s team developed covalent inhibitors of the T790M mutant of EGFR inspired the development of Osimertinib (AZD9291), now FDA approved for treatment of patients with relapsed lung cancer due to resistance to first generation EGFR inhibitors. Dr. Gray has also developed structure-based, generalized approaches for designing drugs to overcome one of the most common mechanisms of resistance observed against most kinase inhibitor drugs, mutation of the so-called "gatekeeper" residue, which has been observed in resistance to drugs targeting BCR-ABL, c-KIT and PDGFR.
    In 2021, Dr. Gray joined Stanford University where he has joined the Stanford Cancer Institute, Chem-H and the Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA) to spur the development of prototype drugs.
    These contributions have been recognized through numerous awards including the National Science Foundation’s Career award in 2007, the Damon Runyon Foundation Innovator award in 2008, the American Association for Cancer Research for Team Science in 2010 and for Outstanding Achievement in 2011 and the American Chemical Society award for Biological Chemistry in 2011, and the Nancy Lurie Marks endowed professorship in 2015 and the Paul Marks Prize in 2019, and the Hope Funds for Cancer Research in 2023.

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSince 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • Harry B Greenberg

    Harry B Greenberg

    Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of pathogenesis; determinants of protective immunity; host range and tissue tropism in liver and GI tract pathogenic viruses and studies of vaccines in people.

  • Peter Greenberg

    Peter Greenberg

    Professor of Medicine (Hematology), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr Greenberg's clinical research involves design and coordination of clinical trials using experimental drugs with biologic focus for both lower and higher risk MDS patients not responding to standard therapies. These studies are particularly based on his prior laboratory investigations of gene expression and hematopoietic regulation in MDS patients. He is Coordinator of the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS (IWG-PM) which generated the revised MDS classification system (the IPSS-R) and the mutation-based prognostic risk system, the IPSS-Molecular (IPSS-M). This project uses such findings to more specifically characterize and treat MDS patients. He is Chair of the NCCN Practice Guidelines Panel for MDS.

  • William Greenleaf

    William Greenleaf

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on developing methods to probe both the structure and function of molecules encoded by the genome, as well as the physical compaction and folding of the genome itself. Our efforts are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies and cutting-edge optical microscopies, and bringing these technologies to bear against basic biological questions by linking DNA sequence, structure, and function.

  • Noah Greenwald

    Noah Greenwald

    Ph.D. Student in Cancer Biology, admitted Autumn 2017

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsUsing deep learning to analyze multiplexed imaging data; profiling the tumor microenvironment to predict response and resistance to checkpoint blockade; integrating genomics, transcriptomics, and imaging to understand how changes in DNA and RNA affect phenotypes at the protein level

  • Xuejun Gu

    Xuejun Gu

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Medical Physics)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsArtificial intelligence in medicine
    Medical imaging and image anlysis
    Treatment planning and clinical decision-making
    FLASH radiobiology study ;