School of Medicine


Showing 31-40 of 55 Results

  • William Rowland Goodyer, MD/PhD

    William Rowland Goodyer, MD/PhD

    Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    BioDr. Goodyer is a physician scientist who specializes in Pediatric Cardiology and Electrophysiology. Will graduated from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) with a BSc in Biology prior to completing his graduate studies at Stanford University in the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). He subsequently completed residency training in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital before returning to Stanford to complete a fellowship in Pediatric Cardiology and advanced fellowship in Pediatric Electrophysiology. He additionally performed a postdoctoral fellowship in the Sean Wu laboratory at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute where he developed the first comprehensive single-cell gene atlas of the entire murine cardiac conduction system (CCS) as well as pioneered the generation of optical imaging agents for the real-time visualization of the CCS to help prevent accidental surgical damage during heart surgeries. Will's lab (www.goodyerlab.com) focuses on basic science advances aimed at the improved diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.

  • Ian Gotlib

    Ian Gotlib

    David Starr Jordan Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCurrent interests include social, cognitive, and biological factors in affective disorders; neural and cognitive processing of emotional stimuli and reward by depressed persons; behavioral activation and anhedonia in depression; social, emotional, and biological risk factors for depression in children.

  • Jeffrey Gould

    Jeffrey Gould

    Robert L. Hess Endowed Professor of Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPopulation-based studies related to neonatal and perinatal diseases.

  • Or Gozani

    Or Gozani

    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the molecular mechanisms by which chromatin-signaling networks effect nuclear and epigenetic programs, and how dysregulation of these pathways leads to disease. Our work centers on the biology of lysine methylation, a principal chromatin-regulatory mechanism that directs epigenetic processes. We study how lysine methylation events are generated, sensed, and transduced, and how these chemical marks integrate with other nuclear signaling systems to govern diverse cellular functions.

  • Edward Graves

    Edward Graves

    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsApplications of molecular imaging in radiation therapy, development of hypoxia and radiosensitivity imaging techniques, small animal image-guided conformal radiotherapy, image processing and analysis.

  • Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Henry T. (Hank) Greely

    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsSince 1992 my work has concentrated on ethical, legal, and social issues in the biosciences. I am particularly active on issues arising from neuroscience, human genetics, and stem cell research, with cross-cutting interests in human research protections, human biological enhancement, and the future of human reproduction.

  • Harry B Greenberg

    Harry B Greenberg

    Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMolecular mechanisms of pathogenesis; determinants of protective immunity; host range and tissue tropism in liver and GI tract pathogenic viruses and studies of vaccines in people.

  • William Greenleaf

    William Greenleaf

    Professor of Genetics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab focuses on developing methods to probe both the structure and function of molecules encoded by the genome, as well as the physical compaction and folding of the genome itself. Our efforts are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing technologies and cutting-edge optical microscopies, and bringing these technologies to bear against basic biological questions by linking DNA sequence, structure, and function.