School of Medicine


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  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioNancy A. Haug, PhD is Adjunct Clinical Professor and Addiction Medicine fellowship program faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently leads didactics and a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows, and teaches a postdoctoral seminar on ethics and legal issues for the Clinical Psychology Fellowship Program. Dr. Haug's primary academic affiliation is Professor of Psychology at Palo Alto University, where she teaches, advises and supervises doctoral students in the PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium. Dr. Haug previously served as faculty and attending psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco, and taught in the University of California, Berkeley Alcohol & Drug Studies program. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a Master's degree in Counseling Psychology at Loyola University, Maryland. She completed a clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco General Hospital in public service and minority mental health.

    Dr. Haug is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethics Committee and formerly served as a member of the California Psychological Association Ethics Committee. She is a Fellow and Member-at-Large for Practice in the Society of Addiction Psychology (APA, Division 50). Dr. Haug is on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and the Journal of Addictive Diseases. She was funded by SAMHSA for a practitioner-education initiative to expand training for evidence-based addiction treatment. Dr. Haug leads the Harm Reduction and Addiction Treatment Laboratory at PAU with current research studies on the implementation of evidence-based practices in addiction treatment, harm reduction for substance use, cannabis vaping and psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.

    Dr. Haug has been licensed as a psychologist in California since 2004, is board certified in addiction psychology by American Board of Professional Psychology, and has an independent practice in Los Gatos, CA. She has clinical expertise in treating substance misuse and eating disorders using motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based therapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Dr. Haug is a Stanford WellConnect referral for fellows, residents and faculty in her clinical practice. She recently completed the Stanford YogaX 200-Hour Yoga Teacher Training Program with healthcare setting emphasis.

  • John P. Hegarty II

    John P. Hegarty II

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioI am a neuroscientist and Principal Investigator of the Stanford Clinical Neuroscience (CNS) Lab in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences as well as Director of Neuroimaging for the Autism and Developmental Disorders Research Program at Stanford. My innovative research studies clinical aspects of cognitive and behavioral neuroscience, with a special focus on examining the neural circuitry associated with important brain-behavior relationships that may underlie different psychological and psychiatric domains in autistic children, adolescents, and adults. The ultimate goal of this research is to improve our understanding of the development of different cognitive and behavioral skills in order to develop mechanistically driven interventions that will improve precision medicine for mental health. Biologically based diagnosis and treatment are extremely limited for most psychological and psychiatric conditions but also critically needed to increase early identification and improve treatment outcomes, especially for neurodevelopmental disorders in which early intervention is the most beneficial. My early career research has primarily focused on clinical neuroscience using neuroimaging (e.g., MRI & EEG) to examine the effects of different drugs and behavioral interventions on the brain, especially for developing biomarkers for improving treatment planning and monitoring biological changes in response to single dose and clinical trials.

    My primary contributions to science thus far fall within these major categories: 1) identifying the neural correlates of individual differences in cognition and behavior, 2) developing new interventions and investigating the neurobiological substrates of response to treatment, 3) examining different factors that contribute to brain development, 4) summarizing and increasing accessibility to autism-related research, and 5) methods development for neuroimaging studies. My earliest research investigated the neurobiology of alexithymia, dyslexia, and stress using structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging to test theories of the mechanisms that contribute to differences in cognition and behavior. My subsequent dissertation research, in which I began to focus on neurodevelopmental disorders, examined the neural correlates of response to beta-blockers in autistic adults and also assessed the contribution of cerebellar circuits to the autism phenotype. During my postdoctoral training, I have developed further skills for working with children in multiple clinical research settings, especially for using advanced neuroimaging approaches to examine important brain-behavior relationships. This includes a recent K99/R00 from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NCT04278898 & NCT05664789) that will assess the neurobiology of restricted and repetitive behaviors in autistic children and examine the efficacy and target engagement of a novel nutritional supplement and investigational drug, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in the brain. You can find more information about our NAC studies at https://redcap.link/NACandAutism.