School of Medicine


Showing 41-60 of 77 Results

  • Melanie Hom

    Melanie Hom

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Melanie Hom is a Clinical Assistant Professor and attending psychologist in the Anxiety and Depression Adult Psychological Treatment (ADAPT) Clinic, Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Clinic, and Stanford Mental Health for Asians Research and Treatment (SMHART) Clinic. She utilizes evidence-based therapies, including acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), and DBT. Dr. Hom also strives to provide culturally informed psychotherapy in her work with individuals, couples, and families. Her research interests include (1) enhancing help-seeking and treatment engagement among individuals at elevated suicide risk and (2) improving mental health care services for Asians and Asian Americans.

  • Hamed Honari

    Hamed Honari

    Postdoctoral Scholar, Psychiatry

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMachine Learning, Neuroimaging, Computer Vision,Deep Learning, Signal Processing

  • David S. Hong

    David S. Hong

    Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Hong is a child and adolescent psychiatrist and clinician-scientist. His responsibilities span clinical care, teaching/mentorship, and research, with a unifying theme of advancing a developmental cognitive framework as applied to psychiatric conditions. Using this core premise, he work encompasses multiple domains: specialized clinical care, fellowship training, research mentorship, and elaborating the role of sex-specific determinants of development, one of the greatest contributors to individual developmental variation.

    His lab investigates genetic and hormonal influences underlying sex differences in child psychiatric conditions. Sex has emerged as a critical variable driving differences in the phenomenology, course, and treatment of many mental health disorders. Unfortunately, an understanding of the biological mechanisms driving these effects are limited. By applying innovative neuroimaging and multiomic approaches, Dr. Hong seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the connection between sex-specific effects and complex psychiatric diseases. To do so, research in the Hong Lab focuses on the role of genes on the X and Y chromosomes, as well as circulating sex hormones on brain development, cognition, and behavior. The lab broadly aims to elucidate the changing nature of these mechanisms across various stages of development.

    Another area of focus is the implementation of clinical informatics in child psychiatry and the development of digital mental health tools. As co-Director of the Mental Health Technology and Innovation Hub, Dr. Hong is helping to develop clinical and research infrastructure within the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences to advance development of mobile mental health resources that will improve efficacy and access to mental health care.

  • Janie Hong, Ph.D.

    Janie Hong, Ph.D.

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Hong is invested in developing evidence-based ways to individualize care and address diversity factors in therapy and in training fellows and residents in these approaches. She has published and presented widely on these and other topics in psychology.

    In clinical practice, she specializes in providing cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) and other evidence based treatments. She is also committed to helping neurodiverse and culturally diverse individuals work with their differences, navigate prevailing social norms, and advocate for their needs as diverse individuals.

  • Korey Hood

    Korey Hood

    Professor of Pediatrics (Endocrinology) and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychology)

    BioDr. Hood directs NIH- and foundation-funded clinical research aimed at promoting health and quality of life outcomes for people with diabetes. He has expertise and experience with diabetes epidemiology and interventions, study design, methodology, data management, and advanced statistical methods. There are two content threads to his work: 1) construct prevention and treatment programs to address modifiable psychological and family factors that create barriers to optimal diabetes management, and 2) optimize the use of devices and technologies to improve health outcomes. With regard to the first thread, Dr. Hood has successfully implemented depression screening programs in tertiary diabetes and GI clinics within a Quality Improvement framework, and recently completed a large scale clinical trial on a distress prevention program for teens with type 1 diabetes. Dr. Hood manages and analyzes all the data from these studies. From a device and technology standpoint, Dr. Hood coordinates the Human Factors assessments in Drs. Maahs’ and Buckingham’s closed loop studies and is recognized as one of the experts in this area nationally and internationally. In addition, he has implemented Human Factors assessments in national (e.g., T1D Exchange) studies and registries and is the lead psychologist on 2 of the 4 UC4 grants from NIDDK (Hovorka, PI; Bergenstal, PI). These assessments focus on uptake of devices and technologies, and determining strategies to promote uptake and optimize their use. Dr. Hood and his research team have published over 100 scientific articles on these topics and are active presenters at diabetes, behavioral medicine, and advocacy conferences.

    Dr. Hood also works in clinical and service settings. Dr. Hood is a licensed clinical psychologist and is part of the diabetes care team at Stanford. He is the past chair of the American Diabetes Association’s Behavioral Medicine and Psychology Interest Group and is currently a member of the Research Policy Committee. He was also a member of the ADA’s Call to Congress in March 2017. Dr. Hood is an Associate Editor for both Diabetes Care and Pediatric Diabetes.

  • Benjamin Joseph Hoover

    Benjamin Joseph Hoover

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    BioDr. Hoover graduated with a BS in Biology and a minor in Chemistry from Duke University. After his undergraduate studies, he joined the Leppla Laboratory at the National Institutes of Health as an Intramural Research Training Awardee. While there, he investigated the use of engineered anthrax toxin as a chemotherapeutic, and he graduated from the NIH Academy, with extensive coursework in health disparities. Then he returned to the Duke University School of Medicine, where he earned his MD in 2017. While in medical school, his interest in infectious disease evolved into curiosity about the gut-brain axis. He investigated gut sensation and its role in behavior using 3D electron microscopy, ultimately publishing a novel characterization of tuft cell ultrastructure.

    Given his growing interest in behavior, Dr. Hoover pursued psychiatry residency at the MGH McLean program. During this time, he was accepted into the R-25 funded Physician Scientist Training Program and joined the Kahn Laboratory at the Joslin Diabetes Center. He employed an iPSC model to investigate the role of insulin signaling dysfunction in Alzheimer’s Disease pathogenesis. His clinical interests also began to focus on the intersection of medical and psychiatric disease. He served as a chief resident and won the Anne Alonso Award for Psychotherapy and the Residency Neuroscience Award. After residency, he was accepted into the MGH Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Fellowship.

    After graduating from fellowship in 2022, Dr. Hoover joined the Stanford University School of Medicine faculty as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry. As part of the Medical Psychiatry division, he consults on hospitalized patients with psychiatric comorbidities within intensive care units and general medical and surgical floors. The interface between endocrinology and psychiatry remains a particular area of clinical and research interest, and he brings years of previous laboratory experience in this area to his clinical practice.

  • Valerie Hoover

    Valerie Hoover

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioValerie Hoover, PhD is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in California who specializes in the assessment and treatment of anxiety disorders, stress management and recovery, trauma and PTSD, interpersonal issues, and psychological adjustment following medical events. Dr. Hoover is also an expert in motivational enhancement and is a MINT-Certified Motivational Interviewing trainer.

    Dr. Hoover completed a doctorate in Clinical Psychology with an emphasis in Health Psychology at the University of Florida in 2013, then went on to complete her clinical residency at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and post-doctoral fellowship at the San Francisco VA Medical Center.

    Dr. Hoover is passionate about helping people make meaningful and durable changes in their lives.

  • Hadi Hosseini

    Hadi Hosseini

    Associate Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab’s research portfolio crosses multiple disciplines including computational neuropsychiatry, cognitive neuroscience, multimodal neuroimaging and neurocognitive rehabilitation. Our computational neuropsychiatry research mainly involves investigating alterations in the organization of connectome in various neurodevelopmental and neurocognitive disorders using state of the art neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, sMRI, DWI, functional NIRS) combined with novel computational methods (graph theoretical and multivariate pattern analyses).

    The ultimate goal of our research is to translate the findings from computational neuropsychiatry research toward developing personalized interventions. We have been developing personalized interventions that integrate computerized cognitive rehabilitation, real-time functional brain imaging and neurofeedback, as well as virtual reality (VR) tailored toward targeted rehabilitation of the affected brain networks in patients with neurocognitive disorders.

  • Kristene Hossepian

    Kristene Hossepian

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Child & Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development

    BioDr. Kristene Hossepian is a licensed clinical psychologist with expertise in anxiety, depression, eating disorders, parent management training, and stress. During her doctorate training at the PGSP-Stanford Psy.D. Consortium she received extensive training in a number of evidence-based treatment approaches for children and adolescents, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She completed her pre-doctoral internship at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital/Children’s Health Council where she worked with youth struggling with severe eating disorders, chronic medical conditions, trauma, depression, and anxiety. After receiving her doctorate in 2020, Dr. Hossepian completed her postdoctoral fellowship at the Stanford University School of Medicine, where she continued to receive training in evidence-based treatments for youth with a variety of presenting problems at the inpatient and outpatient level.

    Currently, Dr. Hossepian is a Clinical Assistant Professor within the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine. She works alongside Dr. Mary Sanders and Dr. Jennifer Derenne at the Comprehensive Care Program serving children and adolescents who are medically compromised due to complications with their eating disorders. Additionally, Dr. Hossepian works within Dr. Victoria Cosgrove’s Stress, Resilience, Emotion, and Mood (StREam) Laboratory to identify the ways that psychobiological stress responsivity is implicated in the emergence and propagation of affective symptomatology. Dr. Hossepian is interested in exploring the physiological mechanisms underlying mood disorders and eating disorders as well as providing children and adolescents with novel emotion regulation strategies.

  • Rona Hu

    Rona Hu

    Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioDr. Hu is Medical Director of the Acute Psychiatric Inpatient Unit at Stanford Hospital, specializing in the care of those with serious mental illnesses, including schizophrenia, bipolar and depression. She completed medical school and residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, and fellowships in Pharmacology and Schizophrenia Research through the National Institutes of Health. She is also active in the minority issues and cultural psychiatry, and has received regional and national recognition for her clinical care, research and teaching.