School of Medicine


Showing 61-80 of 278 Results

  • Geoffrey Hart-Cooper

    Geoffrey Hart-Cooper

    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - General Pediatrics

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Hart-Cooper's research focuses on youth provider barriers and education surrounding pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV (PrEP). He founded the Virtual PrEP Program for Adolescents and Young Adults at Stanford to improve access to PrEP care for youth within California. In his current role, he advises health departments and health systems in creating youth-focused telehealth tools to improve youth access to PrEP.

  • Phillip M. Harter, M.D.

    Phillip M. Harter, M.D.

    Associate Professor (Teaching) of Emergency Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical Education, particularly the role of simulation (part-task trainers, human patient simulators and virtual reality) in the education of medical students and residents. Also, the use of the internet for distance learning in health care professions.

  • Gary E Hartman, MD, MBA

    Gary E Hartman, MD, MBA

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - Pediatric Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMinimal Access and Robotic Surgery
    Neonatal Surgery
    Childhood Oncology

  • Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD

    Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD

    Michael F. Marmor, M.D. Professor of Retinal Science and Disease and Professor of Ophthalmology

    BioMary Elizabeth Hartnett, MD, is the Michael F. Marmor, M.D. Professor in Retinal Science and Diseases and is a Professor of Ophthalmology at Stanford University. Dr. Hartnett is the director of Pediatric Retina at Stanford University and principal investigator of a retinal angiogenesis laboratory, in which she studies causes and treatments for diseases including retinopathy of prematurity and age-related macular degeneration. She created the first-ever academic textbook on the subject, Pediatric Retina, in its third edition, which has proven to be an invaluable resource for residents and ophthalmologists internationally.

    Dr. Hartnett’s NIH-funded laboratory of vascular biology and angiogenesis has studied mechanisms causing pathology in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Her work in AMD has been to understand the mechanisms involved in activation and invasion of choroidal endothelial cells anterior to the RPE in order to maintain vasculature that is physiologic and not damaging beneath the RPE. Her lab has elucidated environmental stressors that lead to scarring in the macula for which no vision improvement is currently possible. The goal is to find methods to prevent the scarring.

    Her lab’s work in ROP provided the proof of concept to regulate an angiogenic signaling pathway by inhibiting VEGF to facilitate intraretinal neovascularization as well as to inhibit abnormal extraretinal neovascularization and reduce retinal destruction used in previous treatments. Her work has been translated through clinical trials to lead to new treatments for severe ROP and has represented a paradigm shift in the understanding and treatment of severe ROP.

    Dr. Hartnett has received numerous awards, including the Weisenfeld Award, the highest award for clinician-scientists given by the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), in 2018, and is an ARVO Gold Fellow. She received the 2019 Paul Kayser/Retina Research Foundation Global Award, the Macula Society’s 2016 Paul Henkind Award and its 2019 Arnall Patz Medal, the Paul Kayser/RRF Global Award from the PanAmerica Society, and the 2021 Suzanne Veronneau-Troutman Award, the most prestigious award from Women in Ophthalmology. In 2022, she was one of six at the University of Utah to receive a distinguished research award, for Pediatrics and Ophthalmology.

    Dr. Hartnett's prolific publication record includes 227 articles in peer-reviewed journals and over 40 book chapters. She has delivered numerous national and international invited lectures. Her long list of professional committee work includes serving as chair of the Publications Committee of ARVO, as a mentor for the ARVO Leadership Development Program, and in leadership positions internationally as chair of the research advisory committees for The Macula Society and the Jack McGovern Coats Disease Foundation as well as Chair of the Credentialing Committee for The Retina Society. She reviews manuscripts for more than 20 eye and science journals and serves on the editorial boards of PlosOne, Molecular Vision, and the American Journal of Ophthalmology. Dr. Hartnett is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons (FACS) and a Silver and Gold Fellow of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (FARVO).

  • William Haskell

    William Haskell

    Professor (Research) of Medicine, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy major research interests and activities over the next several years will focus on the development and evaluation of the objective measurement of physical activity in free-living populations using a variety of sensing devices and mobile phones for data collection and processing. Also, I will continue to direct the Stanford Heart Network with the major mission being to assist community-based CVD prevention/treatment programs implement more effective heart attack and stroke prevention programs.

  • Trevor Hastie

    Trevor Hastie

    John A. Overdeck Professor, Professor of Statistics and of Biomedical Data Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsFlexible statistical modeling for prediction and representation of data arising in biology, medicine, science or industry. Statistical and machine learning tools have gained importance over the years. Part of Hastie's work has been to bridge the gap between traditional statistical methodology and the achievements made in machine learning.

  • Nancy A. Haug

    Nancy A. Haug

    Adjunct Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    BioNancy A. Haug, PhD is Adjunct Clinical Professor and Addiction Medicine fellowship program faculty in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. She currently leads didactics and a journal club for Addiction Medicine fellows, and teaches a postdoctoral seminar on ethics and legal issues for the Clinical Psychology Fellowship Program. Dr. Haug's primary academic affiliation is Professor of Psychology at Palo Alto University, where she teaches, advises and supervises doctoral students in the PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium. Dr. Haug previously served as faculty and attending psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco, and taught in the University of California, Berkeley Alcohol & Drug Studies program. She obtained her PhD in Clinical Psychology and Behavioral Medicine at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and a Master's degree in Counseling Psychology at Loyola University, Maryland. She completed a clinical internship and postdoctoral fellowship at University of California, San Francisco and San Francisco General Hospital in public service and minority mental health.

    Dr. Haug is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethics Committee and formerly served as a member of the California Psychological Association Ethics Committee. She is a Fellow and Member-at-Large for Practice in the Society of Addiction Psychology (APA, Division 50). Dr. Haug is on the editorial board of the Journal of Psychoactive Drugs and the Journal of Addictive Diseases. She was funded by SAMHSA for a practitioner-education initiative to expand training for evidence-based addiction treatment. Dr. Haug leads the Harm Reduction and Addiction Treatment Laboratory at PAU with current research studies on the implementation of evidence-based practices in addiction treatment, harm reduction for substance use, cannabis vaping and psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy.

    Dr. Haug has been licensed as a psychologist in California since 2004, is board certified in addiction psychology by American Board of Professional Psychology, and has an independent practice in Los Gatos, CA. She has clinical expertise in treating substance misuse and eating disorders using motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavioral and mindfulness-based therapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Dr. Haug is a Stanford WellConnect referral for fellows, residents and faculty in her clinical practice. She recently completed the Stanford YogaX 200-Hour Yoga Teacher Training Program with healthcare setting emphasis.

  • Michelle Hauser, MD, MS, MPA, FACP, FACLM

    Michelle Hauser, MD, MS, MPA, FACP, FACLM

    Clinical Associate Professor, Surgery - General Surgery
    Clinical Associate Professor (By courtesy), Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPrimary care physician, prevention researcher, medical educator and classically-trained chef who combines these fields to move people away from diets that lead to chronic disease and toward eating delicious food that promotes health and well-being.

  • Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Kristina Elizabeth Hawk

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Radiology - Rad/Nuclear Medicine

    BioKristina Elizabeth Hawk, MS MD PhD is a Nuclear Medicine Physician and Neuroradiologist. As a physician scientist, integrated MD/PhD training helped build a foundation to explore translational research efforts, using a full and intricate understanding of the research process, and the developed ability to understand, discuss and teach new emerging concepts. Dr. Hawk’s dissertation in Neuroscience focused on the regulation of Nitric Oxide Synthase in the dorsal and ventral striatum, exploring the neurochemical role of nitric oxide producing interneurons, and their ability to coordinate dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling in areas of the brain relevant to cognition and motivated behavior.

    Eager to expand her passion into the field of Medical Radiation Physics, she also completed a separate Masters degree in Medical Radiation Physics. This provided her with in depth training of how therapeutic and diagnostic instruments use both ionizing and non-ionizing radiation in the clinical setting. She then completed her Medical Doctorate and Diagnostic Radiology Residency at the University of Southern California (USC), learning the art of medicine while serving the diverse population at Los Angeles County Hospital.

    Dr. Hawk completed clinical fellowship requirements in Nuclear Medicine at USC, and is now Board Certified by the American Board of Nuclear Medicine. She also completed a Neuroradiology fellowship at USC, and is Board Certified the American Board of Radiology. She served as both the Chief Resident and Chief Neuroradiology Fellow.

    Dr. Hawk has held multiple local and national leadership positions, including positions in the American College of Radiology (ACR), the American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) and the Society of Nuclear and Molecular Medicine (SNMMI). Dr. Hawk is an editorial board member of the Journal of the American College of Radiology (JACR). She has served as the Vice-Chair for Education for the Nuclear Medicine Resident Organization of the ACNM, and the Educational Liaison for the Resident and Fellow Section of the ACR. Currently, she serves on the national ACR Commission for Women and General Diversity as well as the ACR Commission on Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Hawk also sits on the ACR Council Steering Committee.

    Dr. Hawk is committed to continually exploring the beautiful applications of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation to image and treat the human body.