School of Medicine


Showing 1-12 of 12 Results

  • Peter K.  Jackson

    Peter K.  Jackson

    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCell cycle and cyclin control of DNA replication .

  • Prasanna Jagannathan

    Prasanna Jagannathan

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Infectious Diseases) and of Microbiology and Immunology

    BioI am an Infectious Diseases physician-scientist with a research program in human immunology of malaria and clinical trials of immune modulatory interventions. Our group has been conducting detailed longitudinal cohort studies in children and pregnant women in order to study how repeated malaria shapes the cellular immune response. We are also studying how malaria control interventions such as antimalarial chemoprevention and vector control shape the acquisition and/or maintenance of protective immunity to malaria. We have expanded this work to not only include studying the mechanisms driving naturally acquired immunity to malaria, but other infectious diseases, including SARS CoV-2. We have also lead and/or participated in studies evaluating therapeutic strategies for patients with mild to moderate COVID-19.

  • Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Safwan Jaradeh, MD

    Professor of Neurology (Adult Neurology) and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsClinical interests include autonomic disorders, small fiber neuropathies and the development of effective methods of testing and treating these disorders. Prior work has focused on small fiber painful and autonomic neuropathies; syndromes of orthostatic intolerance and syncope; gastrointestinal motility dysfunction; cyclic vomiting; protacted Gastroesophageal Reflux; non-allergic rhinitis syndromes; and the relationship between the autonomic nervous system and normal or abnormal sleep. Additional areas of interest include the neurology of phonation and swallowing disorders, and peripheral nerve injury and repair.

  • Ted Jardetzky

    Ted Jardetzky

    Professor of Structural Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe Jardetzky laboratory is studying the structures and mechanisms of macromolecular complexes important in viral pathogenesis, allergic hypersensitivities and the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation, with an interest in uncovering novel conceptual approaches to intervening in disease processes. Ongoing research projects include studies of paramyxovirus and herpesvirus entry mechanisms, IgE-receptor structure and function and TGF-beta ligand signaling pathways.

  • Daniel Jarosz

    Daniel Jarosz

    Associate Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory studies conformational switches in evolution, disease, and development. We focus on how molecular chaperones, proteins that help other biomolecules to fold, affect the phenotypic output of genetic variation. To do so we combine classical biochemistry and genetics with systems-level approaches. Ultimately we seek to understand how homeostatic mechanisms influence the acquisition of biological novelty and identify means of manipulating them for therapeutic and biosynthetic benefit.

  • Michael Jeng

    Michael Jeng

    Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology/Oncology)
    On Partial Leave from 03/01/2024 To 02/28/2025

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsResearch interests focus on: 1) histiocytic disorders, such as Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), and 2) vascular anomalies and malformations.

  • Susy Jeng

    Susy Jeng

    Clinical Associate Professor, Neurology
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics

    BioDr. Susy Jeng is Clinical Associate Professor of Neurology at Stanford Children’s Hospital at Stanford University. Dr. Jeng received her A.B. at Harvard College and M.D. at the University of California, San Diego. She completed her pediatrics residency at University of California, San Francisco and is board-certified in pediatrics. After practicing general pediatrics for two years, she returned to UCSF for neurology residency. Upon completion of her residencies, she joined the faculty at Stanford as a general child neurologist with a special interest in medical education. She is the site director for the Stanford medical student neurology clerkship and the pediatric neurology liaison to the Stanford pediatrics residency program.

  • Tomas Jimenez

    Tomas Jimenez

    Professor of Sociology

    BioTomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

    He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

    Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • Evaleen Kay Jones

    Evaleen Kay Jones

    Clinical Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsEvaleen Jones has a passion for Global Health Education. She is President, Founder of Child Family Health International, a non-profit 501©(3) $2 million organization that oversees the placement of 650+l students in immersion programs (a mini 'peace corps') in developing countries. She is also Board Certified in Addiction Medicine (American Society Addiction Medicine and a certified instructor of Mindfulness through the Center for Mind Body Medicine.

  • Neha Shirish Joshi, MD MS

    Neha Shirish Joshi, MD MS

    Clinical Scholar, Pediatrics
    Postdoctoral Scholar, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine

    BioNeha S Joshi, MD MS is a Clinical Scholar in the Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Stanford University. Her clinical responsibilities include caring for hospitalized children at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford as a board certified Pediatric Hospitalist, and neonatal resuscitation and the care of level I/II late preterm and term newborns as a Neonatal Hospitalist. Dr. Joshi completed her MD with Distinction at the University of California San Francisco, followed by both residency in Pediatrics and fellowship in Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Stanford University. Dr. Joshi additionally completed a Masters in Clinical Research and Epidemiology at Stanford University. Her research program seeks to identify and implement high value care practices for late preterm and term infants during the birth hospitalization. Dr. Joshi's prior work has included the development of a clinical examination-based approach to identifying late preterm and term infants at risk for early onset sepsis; this work won the Jennifer Daru Memorial Award for manuscript with most potential to impact clinical care. Dr Joshi is currently working on identifying evidence-based admission criteria, clinical benchmarks, and quality markers for late preterm infants. Dr. Joshi's work has been supported by the NIH F32 Ruth L. Kirschstein Postdoctoral Individual National Research Service Award, the Gerber Foundation, and the Stanford Maternal and Child Health Research Institute.

  • Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Shashank V. Joshi, MD

    Professor (Teaching) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) and, by courtesy of Pediatrics and, of Education
    On Partial Leave from 10/15/2023 To 10/01/2024

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Joshi's teaching and research focuses on increasing knowledge and effectiveness of school mental health, youth wellbeing, positive psychology, pediatric psychotherapy and medication interventions. Areas of study include: the therapeutic alliance in medical care, structured psychotherapy interventions, cultural issues in pediatrics, wellbeing promotion and suicide prevention in schools settings, and faculty development in graduate medical education.