School of Medicine


Showing 51-60 of 92 Results

  • Hanlee P. Ji

    Hanlee P. Ji

    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and, by courtesy of Electrical Engineering

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsCancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development, cancer rearrangements, genome sequencing, big data analysis

  • Xiaolin Jia

    Xiaolin Jia

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsQuality improvement, palliative care

  • Can "Angela" Jiang

    Can "Angela" Jiang

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Can "Angela" Jiang is a board certified family physician who enjoys caring for the whole family, from newborn care to geriatrics. She has special interests in women's health, adolescent health, pediatrics, and medical student education. She specializes in primary care procedures including gynecologic procedures.

    Prior to medical school, Dr. Jiang was a high school biology teacher in Chicago with Teach for America and loves combining her passions for teaching and medicine on a daily basis at Stanford Family Medicine. Dr. Jiang also teaches residents at the Stanford Health Care-O'Connor Hospital residency program and is the director of the O’Connor-Stanford Leaders in Education Residency Program (OSLER). Dr. Jiang is also passionate about community outreach and works with the Stanford Youth Diabetes Coaches Program.

    Outside of clinic, she enjoys hiking, reading, group fitness classes, traveling, and running after her two young kids.

  • Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Jocelyn Jiao, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Primary Care and Population Health

    BioDr. Jiao is a fellowship-trained, board-certified neurologist with the Movement Disorders Center at Stanford Health Care. She is also a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences.

    Dr. Jiao has extensive experience providing comprehensive care for patients with different types of movement disorders, including Parkinson’s disease. She is fellowship-trained in both movement disorders and hospice and palliative medicine. Dr. Jiao is developing an interdisciplinary neuropalliative clinic that emphasizes planning for the future and maximizes quality of life for people living with chronic neurological illness.

    Dr. Jiao’s research efforts include a pilot study assessing the impact of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as a treatment for Parkinson’s-related motor symptoms upon mood and pain. Specifically, this work focuses on identifying correlations between DBS targets and reductions in medications that address depression, anxiety, and impulsivity symptoms that result from Parkinson’s treatments. Dr. Jiao has also completed a pilot study focused upon narrative medicine interventions for people living with Parkinson’s disease.

    Dr. Jiao has published her work in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including Pain Medicine and the Journal of Neurosurgery. Dr. Jiao is a member of the American Academy of Neurology, the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society , and the International Neuropalliative Care Society.

  • Tomas Jimenez

    Tomas Jimenez

    Professor of Sociology

    BioTomás Jiménez is Associate Professor of Sociology and Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. He is also Director of the undergraduate program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity and Director of graduate studies in sociology. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. His forthcoming book, The Other Side of Assimilation: How Immigrants are Changing American Life (University of California Press, 2017), uses interviews from a race and class spectrum of Silicon Valley residents to show how a relational form of assimilation changes both newcomers (immigrants and their children) and established individuals (people born in the US to US-born parents). His first book, Replenished Ethnicity: Mexican Americans, Immigration, and Identity(University of California Press, 2010) draws on interviews and participant observation to understand how uninterrupted Mexican immigration influences the ethnic identity of later-generation Mexican Americans. The book was awarded the American Sociological Association’s Sociology of Latinos/as Section Distinguished Book Award. Professor Jiménez has also published this research in the American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, International Migration Review, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Social Science Quarterly, DuBois Review, and the Annual Review of Sociology.

    He is currently working several other projects. The first looks at how immigration becomes part of American national identity by studying a sample of high school US history textbooks from 1930-2005. A second project (with social psychologist John Dovidio (Yale), political scientist Deborah Schildkraut (Tufts), and social psychologist Yuen Ho (UCLA), uses survey data (with embedded experiments) and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape the sense of belonging and related intergroup attitudes, behaviors, and support for immigration policies among immigrants and host-society members in the United States. This project is funded by the Russell Sage Foundation and the United Parcel Service Endowment Fund at Stanford. A third project (with graduate students Anna Boch and Katharina Roessler) uses Yelp! data to examine the contextual factors that predict whether Mexican food has entered a mainstream. In another project, Professor Jiménez, with Marrianne Cooper (Clayman Institute, Stanford University), and Chrystal Redekopp (Laboratory for Social Research, Stanford), are studying how Silicon Valley residents find alternative forms of housing in one of the most expensive real estate markets in the world.

    Professor Jiménez has taught at the University of California, San Diego. He has been named a Sigma Xi Distinguished Lecturer (2017-19). He has also been an Irvine Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Sage Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University (CASBS). He was the American Sociological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of U.S. Rep. Michael Honda, where he served as a legislative aide for immigration, veterans’ affairs, housing, and election reform. His writing on policy has appeared in reports for the Immigration Policy Center, and he has written opinion-editorials on the topic of immigrant assimilation in several major news outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, CNN.com, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the San Diego Union-Tribune.

  • Booil Jo

    Booil Jo

    Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsLatent Variable Modeling, Causal Inference, Longitudinal Data Analysis, Missing Data Analysis, Mixture and Growth Mixture Modeling, Prevention Science Methodology.

  • Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD

    Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD

    Adjunct Clinical Instructor, Educational Programs and Services (EPS)

    BioDr. Nawal L. Atwan Johansen, MD, FACP is a Board Certified Internal Medicine Physician. She practices as a primary care internal medicine physician in Silicon Valley and the Bay Area. She received her BA from Princeton University, MD from Harvard Medical School, and Internal Medicine Residency training at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. She served on the Stanford Medical School faculty as Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine. In recognition of her excellence in patient care, she received the Stanford Health Care Faculty Recognition Award for Patient Centeredness for achieving the 99th percentile of patient satisfaction and likelihood to recommend scores.

    Dr. Johansen was selected by the Stanford Department of Medicine and the Stanford Health Care Administration to be the founding Medical Director of Stanford Health Care’s Clinical Advice Services to build a clinical triage program from the ground up for the entire Stanford Health Care enterprise, serving over 100 specialties, 2000 faculty physicians and over 1 million patients.

    Dr. Johansen is an experienced primary care physician focused on providing personalized, high quality care to her patients. Her expertise is in disease diagnosis and management, prevention of disease, health promotion, and advanced practices to promote long term wellness. Dr. Johansen has a private concierge medicine practice in Palo Alto, California. She is credentialed at Stanford Hospital and is a member of the Adjunct Clinical Teaching Faculty at Stanford Medical School.