School of Medicine


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  • Michele Kastelein

    Michele Kastelein

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Vaden Health Center

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsAt Stanford University School of Medicine, one of our major goals is to translate research insights into practical advances that enhance and prolong life. We foster a two-way transfer of knowledge between research laboratories and patient-care settings. Our faculty, staff, postdoctoral scholars and students engage in interdisciplinary efforts to turn this knowledge into therapies that treat or prevent disease.

  • Tamiko Katsumoto

    Tamiko Katsumoto

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Immunology & Rheumatology

    BioTamiko Katsumoto, MD, is a Clinical Associate Professor in the Division of Immunology and Rheumatology at Stanford University. She earned her MD from the University of California, San Francisco. She completed her internal medicine residency and rheumatology fellowship at UCSF, including a postdoc in the immunology lab of Dr. Arthur Weiss. Deeply committed to human and planetary health, she is passionate about educating her patients and colleagues on the merits of sustainable plant-rich diets as a strategy to both improve individual health and mitigate climate change and environmental degradation. She is fascinated by the impact of diet on inflammation and autoimmunity. She serves as the director of the Stanford Immune Related Toxicity Working Group, a multidisciplinary group which aims to improve the quality of care of cancer patients on immune checkpoint inhibitors. She has been investigating the impact of diet on immune-related adverse events. She is also intrigued by the relationship between cancer and autoimmune diseases, including diseases such as scleroderma and dermatomyositis, and the paraneoplastic manifestations of various cancers. She is involved in several clinical trials at Stanford and has spent time at Genentech, where she led several global clinical trials in immunology.

  • Daniel Katz

    Daniel Katz

    Instructor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioDaniel Katz is an Instructor of Medicine and an Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiologist. He completed internal medicine residency at Massachusetts General Hospital, general cardiology training at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and then joined Stanford in 2021 for his advanced heart failure training. Since medical school, his research has focused on identifying the various pathophysiologic patterns and mechanisms that lead to the heterogeneous syndrome of heart failure. His efforts leverage high dimensional data in many forms including clinical phenotypes, plasma proteomics, metabolomics, and genetics. He is presently engaged in analysis of multi-omic data from the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC) and the NHLBI Trans-Omics for Precision Medicine (TOPMed) Program. His clinical interests include advanced heart failure, transplant cardiology, and mechanical circulatory support.

  • Masataka Kawana

    Masataka Kawana

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioDr. Kawana joined the Advanced Heart Failure and Transplant Cardiology group in 2018. He completed his internal medicine, cardiovascular medicine, and heart failure training at Stanford. He also completed a postdoctoral research fellowship under Dr. James Spudich in the Department of Biochemistry. He sees advanced heart failure patients in the clinic and attends CCU/heart failure service, and post-heart transplant and MCS service. His research interests are in the fundamental mechanism of inherited cardiomyopathies, and he studies the effect of gene mutation on the cardiac sarcomere function using cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical approaches, which would lead to the development of novel pharmacotherapy that directly modulates cardiac muscle protein. He is involved in multiple clinical trials for pharmacotherapy in inherited cardiomyopathy and also conducting a device study in heart failure.

  • Vanessa Kennedy

    Vanessa Kennedy

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy)

    BioDr. Kennedy is a board-certified hematologist and medical oncologist who specializes in the treatment of myeloid malignancies, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and myelofibrosis (MF). She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine, Division of Blood and Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy, at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    Dr. Kennedy's research focuses on the use of clinical informatics and bioinformatics in understanding cancer biology and improving patient outcomes. She is also actively involved in interventional clinical trials. Her work has been supported by grant funding from the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society of Hematology, and the Chan-Zuckerberg Foundation.

  • Kian Keyashian

    Kian Keyashian

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Gastroenterology & Hepatology

    BioThe management of inflammatory bowel disease continues to evolve, with the introduction of biologic and small molecule therapies and new goals of treatment, with an emphasis on healing the bowel. My career goal since my graduation from IBD fellowship in 2012 has been to improve the outcomes and quality of life of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In line with these goals, my research has focused investigating new noninvasive diagnostic test, finding factors early in the disease course that might predict a more aggressive disease course and need for different therapies, and investigating new promising effective medications with less side effects.

  • Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Ali Raza Khaki, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine - Oncology

    BioDr. Khaki is a medical oncologist and clinical assistant professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

    In his clinical practice, he treats patients with all forms of genitourinary cancer, including kidney, bladder, prostate, and testicular. He also regularly attends on the inpatient oncology service at Stanford Hospital.
    With each patient, he is devoted to providing exceptional, humanistic care and has been recognized throughout his career for his humanism. As a medical student, he was named to the national Gold Humanism Honor Society and he received the Reza Gandjei Humanism Award as a medical resident at UCSF.

    His research interests include novel therapies for genitourinary cancers, with a focus on urothelial cancer outcomes. He also has studied health care utilization and costs for end-of-life care of cancer patients.

    Dr. Khaki has earned honors and recognition from the American Association for Cancer Research, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network, Conquer Cancer Foundation, and other organizations.

    He has authored numerous articles on topics such as immunotherapy for urothelial cancer, management of cancer patients with COVID-19, and utilization of end-of-life care by cancer patients. In addition, he is an editor for HemOnc.org and theMednet, a physician-only online community where members share clinical questions and answers.