School of Medicine


Showing 21-30 of 53 Results

  • Joel Killen

    Joel Killen

    Professor (Research) of Medicine (General Internal Medicine), Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research is focused on the development and evaluation of cigarette smoking prevention and cessation therapies and obesity prevention treatments for children, adolescents and adults.

  • Dan Seung Kim, MD, PhD, MPH

    Dan Seung Kim, MD, PhD, MPH

    Fellow in Graduate Medical Education

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy research projects within the laboratory of Euan Ashley center around the broad topic of exercise, physiology, and cardiovascular disease:
    1. Digital health interventions - I previously have published on the topic of digital health interventions delivered via an iPhone app (Kim and Javed et al, European Heart Journal - Digital Health 2023). We found that personalizing interventions based on individual's baseline activity was more effective in increasing short-term physical activity than other "one-size fits all" approaches. In our next phase, we will extend this to under-represented populations in digital health and implement cutting-edge artificial intelligence models to improve our interventions.
    2. Molecular mechanisms of exercise physiologic adaptations - using time-series multi-omic data, we aim to map out the molecular responses to endurance exercise training in rats, using data from the Molecular Transducers of Physical Activity Consortium (MoTrPAC). See our recent review in Nature Reviews Genetics - Kim et al, 2021.
    3. Effect of physical activity on coronary artery disease symptoms and outcomes - in collaboration with Dr David Maron and the ISCHEMIA study, I am investigating the effects of physical activity and sedentary behavior on symptoms related to known coronary heart disease and separately, the outcome of all-cause mortality.
    4. Exercise [hysiology - in collaboration with Dr Francois Haddad and Dr Jonathan Myers, I am working on projects to better standardize reporting of maximal oxygen uptake. In brief, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) is an extremely valuable prognostic, but estimation of this physiologic value is poor in certain populations. We are working to improve estimation of this variable and demonstrating its efficacy in predicting hard outcomes in patients with heart failure.
    5. Outcomes in inherited cardiomyopathies - under the mentorship of Dr Euan Ashley, I am building my clinical expertise in treating patients with inherited cardiomyopathies. The Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease (SCICD) is home to clinical care of patients with inherited cardiomyopathies, channelopathies, inherited lipid disorders, neuromuscular disorders (e.g., muscular dystrophy), and vascular disorders (e.g., Marfan's and other aorthopathies). Our clinic is nested within the Heart Failure program and manages those patients who are progressing toward advanced heart failure therapies, such as transplant or left ventricular assist devices. Within this clinic, I am leading projects to describe our experience with mavacamten, a first of its class treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with obstruction.

  • Gloria S. Kim

    Gloria S. Kim

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMedical education
    Health services delivery
    Management of chronic disease
    Patient and physician satisfaction

  • Juyong Brian Kim

    Juyong Brian Kim

    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsThe lifetime risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is determined by the genetic makeup and exposure to modifiable risk factors. The Cardiovascular Link to Environmental ActioN (CLEAN) Lab is interested in understanding how various environmental pollutants (eg. tobacco, e-cigarettes, air pollution and wildfire) interact with genes to affect the transcriptome, epigenome, and eventually disease phenotype of CVD. The current focus is to investigate how different toxic exposures can adversely remodel the vascular wall leading to increased cardiac events. We intersect human genomic discoveries with animal models of disease, in-vitro and in-vivo systems of exposure, single-cell sequencing technologies to solve these questions. Additionally, we collaborate with various members of the Stanford community to develop biomarkers that will aid with detection and prognosis of CVD. We are passionate about the need to reduce the environmental effects on health through strong advocacy and outreach.
    (http://kimlab.stanford.edu)

  • Seung K. Kim  M.D., Ph.D.

    Seung K. Kim M.D., Ph.D.

    KM Mulberry Professor, Professor of Developmental Biology, of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics (Endocrinology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsWe study the development of pancreatic islet cells using molecular, embryologic and genetic methods in several model systems, including mice, pigs, human pancreas, embryonic stem cells, and Drosophila. Our work suggests that critical factors required for islet development are also needed to maintain essential functions of the mature islet. These approaches have informed efforts to generate replacement islets from renewable sources for diabetes.

  • Abby C. King

    Abby C. King

    David and Susan Heckerman Professor and Professor of Epidemiology & Population Health and of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy interests include applications of behavioral theory and social ecological approaches to achieve large scale changes impacting chronic disease prevention and control; expanding the reach and translation of evidence-based interventions through state-of-the-art technologies; exploring social and physical environmental influences on health; applying community participatory research perspectives to address health disparities; and policy-level approaches to health promotion/disease prevention.

  • Derek M. Klarin, MD

    Derek M. Klarin, MD

    Assistant Professor of Surgery (Vascular Surgery)
    On Leave from 06/01/2024 To 05/31/2025

    BioDr. Klarin is a fellowship-trained vascular surgeon.

    For each patient, he develops a comprehensive, compassionate care plan customized to individual needs. His goal is to help each patient achieve the best possible health and quality of life.

    Dr. Klarin performs the full spectrum of diagnostic and treatment procedures for cardiovascular conditions. He treats carotid disease, peripheral artery disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, venous thromboembolism, and other vascular diseases.

    To help advance his field, Dr. Klarin has conducted research. The American Heart Association, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, and other organizations have provided grants to support his studies. He also has co-patented advances in predicting and scoring risk factors for cardiovascular disease and other conditions.

    He has published extensively and co-authored more than 50 articles on new techniques and technology for diagnosing and treating cardiovascular disorders. His work has appeared in the Journal of Vascular Surgery, Circulation, JAMA, Nature Medicine, and other peer-reviewed journals.

    He also has made many invited presentations to his peers. He has spoken at the Vascular Research Initiatives Conference presented by the Society for Vascular Surgery, the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions, and the annual meeting of the American Society for Human Genetics. Topics include risk factors for peripheral artery disease, the benefits of ultrasound screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm, and the impact of genetic variations on cardiovascular disease.

    He is a member of the Global Lipids Genetics Consortium. He is a founding member of the Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Genetics Consortium and the Peripheral Artery Disease Genetics Consortium. He is also a candidate member of the Society for Vascular Surgery.