School of Medicine


Showing 1-10 of 42 Results

  • Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Norman J. Lacayo, MD

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology and Oncology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPediatric Hematology/Oncology, Phase I drug studies for refractory and relapsed leukemia; genomic studies, biologic risk-stratification and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia; prediction or induction response and risk of relapse using phosphoproteomics in childhood AML; novel MRD techniques in childhood ALL.

  • Uri Ladabaum

    Uri Ladabaum

    Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsGastrointestinal cancer prevention and risk management. Risk stratification. Cost-effectiveness analysis. Health services research.

  • Sheila Lahijani, MD, FACLP

    Sheila Lahijani, MD, FACLP

    Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences - Medical Psychiatry

    BioAfter graduating from Brown Medical School, Dr. Lahijani completed the Combined Internal Medicine/Psychiatry Residency Program at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. She then served as a physician in the areas of primary care and triple diagnosis (addiction, HIV, mental health). Thereafter, Dr. Lahijani completed the Psychosomatic Medicine Fellowship at the Feinberg School of Medicine of Northwestern University where she worked at the Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center. During her fellowship, she also served as a psychiatric oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

    Dr. Lahijani joined the faculty of Stanford University School of Medicine in 2015 as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Since her initial appointment, Dr. Lahijani has served as the lead psychiatric oncologist at the Stanford Cancer Center where she provides psychiatric consultation services to patients with cancer and collaborates closely with her hematology and oncology colleagues to deliver comprehensive cancer care.

    In 2019, she was appointed as the Medical Director of the Stanford Cancer Center Psychosocial Oncology Program where she works in Stanford Cancer Center leadership and oversees the development and operationalization of psychiatric consultation for patients with cancer. Dr. Lahijani also attends on the medical/surgical units, ICUs and in the emergency department at Stanford Hospital and Clinics to provide care for patients with complex medical and psychiatric diagnoses and to teach psychiatry, internal medicine, and neurology trainees. Dr. Lahijani is trained in and administers several psychotherapeutic modalities, including Meaning Centered Psychotherapy and Dignity Therapy, in addition to practicing psychopharmacology.

    As Faculty of the Advancing Communication Excellence at Stanford, Dr. Lahijani leads foundational workshops for faculty and staff to advance communication skills with patients, families, and their colleagues. She is committed to developing and contributing to efforts that focus on relationship centered skills and provider wellness.

    Her clinical and scholarly interests include the interface of medicine and psychiatry, pharmacology, psycho-oncology, collaborative care models, psychotherapy for the medically ill, interdisciplinary medical education, teaching, and writing.

  • Marvin Langston

    Marvin Langston

    Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr. Marvin Langston is an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology and Population Health. He is a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute and Urologic Cancer Epidemiology Lab. He is an epidemiologist by training who focuses on the fields of benign prostate and pelvic conditions and urological cancers including prostate and kidney cancers.

    Prior to Stanford, he served as a Research Scientist in the Division of Research at Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Dr. Langston received his PhD in Epidemiology from the University of Arizona’s College of Public Health followed by postdoctoral training in Cancer Prevention and Control at Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine.

    His program of research intends to characterize and measure infectious agents, environmental toxicants, and lifestyle factors; to evaluate the role of these factors in urological cancer etiology and outcomes; and to identify populations at high risk of exposure to these factors. So far he has focused this research to address the following questions: 1) What role do sexually transmitted infections and other systemic infections have in prostate damage and ensuing prostate cancer risk? 2) How can we appropriately model and define early life risk factors for urological cancers? 3) Can we harmonize molecular and clinical aspects of urological condition diagnoses to produce well characterized outcomes for biomarker discovery and etiological investigation? He has primarily addressed these questions using a variety of molecular and clinical epidemiology approaches while developing expertise in the cross-cutting theme of cancer health disparities with particular interests in the cancer care experiences of sexual and gender minorities and racial/ethnic minorities.

    Dr. Langston has been studying the impact of exogenous factors on prostate specific antigen (PSA) concentration in young men as a marker of prostate damage and inflammation for over a decade. As early life PSA has been found predictive of future prostate cancer mortality, he has now setout to optimize risk-stratified screening for prostate cancer. This promising approach uses men’s baseline PSA values to inform their risk of future aggressive and/or fatal prostate cancer and determine their frequency of further screening. Under this approach, men with high baseline age-specific total PSA levels receive more frequent screening and men with lower levels receive less frequent screening. Dr. Langston was awarded an R01 from NCI to evaluate this approach using historically collected biospecimen. His funded research trajectory to this point also includes four training awards (2-NCI and 2-NIDDK) and several internal grants. Dr. Langston was selected in the inaugural class of the White House Cancer Moonshot Scholars for his work.

  • Philip W. Lavori

    Philip W. Lavori

    Professor of Biomedical Data Science, Emeritus

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsBiostatistics, clinical trials, longitudinal studies, casual inference from observational studies, genetic tissue banking, informed consent. Trial designs for dynamic (adaptive) treatment regimes, psychiatric research, cancer.

  • Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Quynh-Thu Le, MD

    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery (OHNS)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory research interest focuses on the identification of biomarkers for prognosis in patients with head & neck or lung cancers. I am also conducting a number of clinical trials specifically in patients with head & neck cancers.

  • Byrne Lee, MD FACS

    Byrne Lee, MD FACS

    Clinical Professor, Surgery - General Surgery

    BioDr. Lee is a native of New York City. He attended the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education at the City College of New York and received his medical degree from New York Medical College. He completed general surgery residency training at Lenox Hill Hospital and fellowship training in surgical oncology at the City of Hope National Cancer Center. Dr. Lee led the Peritoneal Surface Malignancy Program at City of Hope prior to joining Stanford in 2019.

    Dr. Lee is a surgical oncologist who specializes in the treatment of gastrointestinal malignancies. He has dedicated his clinical practice to the surgical management of metastatic disease, particularly to the liver and peritoneum. He has expertise in delivering regional cancer therapies such as heated intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Additionally, he performs surgery for cancers of the stomach, liver, pancreas, small intestine, colon, and soft tissue sarcoma. He utilizes minimally invasive and robotic surgical techniques when appropriate.

    Dr. Lee leads the Regional Cancer Therapies program at Stanford. The program implements and develops novel treatment strategies for patients affected with peritoneal malignancies and oligometastatic disease to the liver. His research focus is on clinical outcomes of multidisciplinary management for gastric, hepatobiliary, and peritoneal surface malignancies. He is a member of a national consensus group performing collaborative research and developing clinical trials for HIPEC surgeries.

  • Carolyn Lee MD PhD

    Carolyn Lee MD PhD

    Assistant Professor of Dermatology

    BioA native of Queens, New York, Dr. Carolyn Lee joined the Stanford Dermatology faculty in February of 2016 as a specialist in the management of patients at a high risk for developing skin cancer. This year, she has been a featured presenter at both the Society for Investigative Dermatology Annual Meeting and the Gordon Research Conference on Epithelial Differentiation and Keratinization. Dr. Lee graduated with honors from Yale University in 1998 with a BS in Biology and received her MD and PhD from Georgetown University with a specialty in tumor biology in 2006. She completed her Dermatology residency at Stanford in 2010 and a Postdoctoral Fellowship in epithelial biology in the lab of Dr. Paul Khavari in December of 2015. Dr. Lee possesses a strong interest in understanding the mechanisms of high-risk non-melanoma skin cancer and is currently a member of Stanford’s High-Risk Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Working Group.

  • Jennifer Lee

    Jennifer Lee

    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsI am a clinical scientist (PhD epidemiology), endocrinologist, and CMO at VAPA Cooperative Studies Program Coordinating Center. My group does pattern and prediction mapping along the life-course of interventions/outcomes and how healthcare system can positively impact health longitudinally. We use novel molecular epi, 'big' data like EHRs using multiple designs/methods/technologies. These interests cut across multiple complex chronic diseases and lifespan.
    https://med.stanford.edu/jleelab.html