School of Medicine


Showing 1-20 of 363 Results

  • Chelsea Ma, MD

    Chelsea Ma, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Dermatology

    BioChelsea Ma, M.D. is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology. Dr. Ma received a Bachelor of Arts degree in human biology from Stanford University. She attended medical school at the University of California Davis, and internship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School. She completed her dermatology residency at University of California Davis, serving as Chief Resident her final year. She completed a clinical research fellowship, focusing on neutrophilic dermatoses, blistering diseases, melanoma, eczema and psoriasis. Her clinical interests include general dermatology and complex medical dermatology.

  • Michael Ma

    Michael Ma

    Assistant Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery (Pediatric Cardiac Surgery)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsOur lab aims to understand the biomechanics that govern a wide spectrum of congenital heart defects, and how those biomechanics change with contemporary operative repair strategies. We simulate operations virtually via CFD, and in ex vivo and in vivo animal models, and analyze how the changes we make alter fluid flow, pressure, and stresses throughout the system. We hope that these experiments can impact and optimize existing techniques that translate quickly to the operating room.

  • Stephen Ma

    Stephen Ma

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Medicine

    BioStephen Ma is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Division of Hospital Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is fellowship-trained in clinical informatics with the following areas of focus: 1) the implementation and evaluation of emerging technologies such as ambient AI scribes, 2) clinician-centered analytics and reporting, 3) the development of machine learning algorithms and workflows for standardization of care, and 4) care team communication and on-call scheduling.

    His undergraduate degree was in Electrical Engineering at Princeton University, after which he pursued his MD/PhD at Columbia University. He did his doctoral work in the laboratory of Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic where he developed human cardiac models of disease incorporating patient-derived stem cells, optogenetics, tissue engineering, optoelectronics, and video processing. He then moved to Stanford University for his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Clinical Informatics prior to joining the faculty.

  • David Maahs

    David Maahs

    Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    BioDr David M. Maahs is the Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics, Division Chief of Pediatric Endocrinology, and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs in Pediatrics at Stanford University and the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. He earned his MD followed by Pediatric Residency at the University of New Mexico. After 3 years on New Mexico’s faculty, Dr. Maahs completed a Pediatric Endocrinology fellowship and a concurrent PhD in Epidemiology at the University of Colorado. He remained on Colorado’s faculty for 10 years, advancing to Professor of Pediatrics before moving to Stanford. Prior to his medical career, Dr. Maahs received a BA and MA in English from the University of Kansas and was inspired to pursue a medical career after serving in the Peace Corps with assignments in Tunisia and the Central African Republic.

    Dr. Maahs’ leadership experiences include being a past co-Chair (2013-16) for Protocols and Publications with the Type 1 Diabetes Exchange for which he continues as Director of International Collaborations. This complements his role as President-elect for the International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes (ISPAD, 2021-25) and Editor-in-Chief for the 2018 ISPAD Clinical Practice Consensus Guidelines. He served on the Professional Practice Committee for the American Diabetes Association (ADA, 2016-18), which writes the annual ADA Standards of Care. Previously, he served on the ADA Scientific Sessions committee representing the Council on Youth. He has also served on national committees for the American Heart Association, the Pediatric Endocrine Society, and multiple journal editorial boards and review committees.

    His scholarly interest is improving care and preventing complications in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Along with Dr Peter Chase, he is author of the 12th and 13th editions of Understanding Diabetes, or ‘Pink Panther,’ which are the most widely used educational books for children newly diagnosed with T1D, distributed internationally by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund (JDRF). More specifically, he has conducted epidemiologic studies that help generate hypotheses for clinical studies, including trials to develop artificial pancreas systems to improve glucose control, lower disease burden, prevent the complications of diabetes, and reduce disparities in diabetes care. He is author or co-author of over 350 research publications. His multi-disciplinary research has been funded by the JDRF, the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), the Helmsley Charitable Trust, and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

    Dr Maahs is Associate Director for the recently formed and NIDDK P30 funded Stanford University Diabetes Research Center (https://sdrc.stanford.edu). His collaborations extend to his role as Principal Investigator (PI) or steering committee member for NIH funded multi-center clinical trials including the FLEX, PERL, and ACTION studies as well as multiple Artificial Pancreas clinical trials. Education, mentorship, and training leadership includes being Program Director with Dr. Georgeanna Klingensmith on the Barbara Davis Center T32 and K12 training grants in Pediatric Endocrinology while at the University of Colorado. He is the PI on the Stanford NIH funded K12 "Training Research Leaders in Type 1 Diabetes.' Dr Maahs is also the Associate Chair for Academic Affairs for the Department of Pediatrics.

    While in the Peace Corps, David met his wife, Christine Walravens, who is also a Pediatrician at Stanford. They enjoy outdoor activities and traveling with their adult children.

  • Alex Macario MD MBA

    Alex Macario MD MBA

    Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Macario studies health care economics & outcomes, with a special focus on surgery and anesthesia. He is well known for helping develop the field of operating room management, and is keenly interested in the cost-effectiveness analyses of drugs and devices. For the past decade Dr. Macario has added medical education as a research priority to better understand methods to best teach students and residents.

  • Crystal Mackall

    Crystal Mackall

    Ernest and Amelia Gallo Family Professor and Professor of Pediatrics and of Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsRecent clinical studies, by us and others, have demonstrated that genetically engineered T cells can eradicate cancers resistant to all other therapies. We are identifying new targets for these therapeutics, exploring pathways of resistance to current cell therapies and creating next generation platforms to overcome therapeutic resistance. We have discovered novel insights into the biology of human T cell exhaustion and developed approaches to prevent and reverse this phenomenon.

  • Kristen Klepac MacKenzie, MD

    Kristen Klepac MacKenzie, MD

    Clinical Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine

    BioDr. Kristen MacKenzie is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine. Dr. MacKenzie graduated AOA from medical school at UCSF and then completed her anesthesia residency and pain medicine fellowships at Stanford. She works at the Stanford Pain Management Center with specialty interests in chronic pelvic and abdominal pain, as well as peripartum pain. She is part of the Stanford Pelvic Health Center for interdisciplinary, multimodal care.

    She also teaches in the Stanford Medical School as the pain team lead for clinical rotations and serves a Clinical Continuity Clerkship Instructor. Additionally, Dr. MacKenzie completed the Clinical Teaching Seminar Series (CTSS) Honors Scholars Program focusing on education of non-anesthesia trained pain medicine fellows on inpatient pain management curriculum, which was a project supported by the Anesthesia Teaching Awards Scholar Program.

    Clinical focus:

    Pelvic pain, due to multiple causes including:
    Dyspareunia
    Painful Bladder Syndrome/ Interstitial cystitis/ Dysuria
    Endometriosis
    Fibroids
    Pelvis Congestion Syndrome
    Pelvic Floor Dysfunction
    Pudendal Nerve Pain
    Rectal/Anal Pain
    Vulvar Pain/ Vulvodynia/ Vaginismus

    Nerve entrapment syndromes, including hernia nerve entrapment

    Post-partum and Peri-partum pain
    Abdominal pain
    Musculoskeletal pain

    She focuses treatment plans around ultrasound and fluoroscopy procedures, non-opioid pain medications, non-drug treatments such as pain psychology, acupuncture, massage, movement therapy and physical therapy.

    For new patients: (650)723-6238 (telephone) and (650)320-9443 (fax)
    For existing patients: (650)723-6238 (telephone)

  • Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D.

    Redlich Professor, Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine and, by courtesy, of Neurology

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMultiple NIH funded projects to characterize CNS mechanisms of human pain. Comparative effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy and chronic pain self-management within the context of opioid reduction (PCORI funded). Single session pain catastrophizing treatment: comparative efficacy & mechanisms (NIH R01). Development and implementation of an open-source learning healthcare system, CHOIR (http://choir/stanford.edu), to optimize pain care and innovative research in real-world patients.