School of Medicine


Showing 11-20 of 31 Results

  • Sushma Reddy

    Sushma Reddy

    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Cardiology)

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy laboratory's expertise in cardiovascular phenotyping has led to the development of mouse models of congenital heart disease that recapitulate abnormal loading conditions on the heart. We have used these models to advance our understanding of the mechanisms of right heart failure in children and adults with congenital heart disease with the long term goal of identifying noninvasive diagnostic tools to better assess right ventricular health and to develop right ventricle specific therapeutics.

  • Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Risheen Reejhsinghani

    Clinical Associate Professor, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine

    BioRisheen Reejhsinghani obtained her medical degree in Mumbai, India, followed by an internal medicine residency at St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston, MA and cardiology fellowship at Baystate Medical Center/Tufts University School of Medicine, where she served as one of the chief fellows. She subsequently completed an advanced echocardiography fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco, and is board certified in echocardiography, general cardiology, and nuclear cardiology.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani practices as a general cardiologist in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, where she also serves as the associate director for the hospital-based consultative cardiology service. As a clinical cardiologist, she believes strongly in the tenets of evidence-based practice, diagnostic cognizance, and patient education. She also has a specific interest in the burgeoning field of Cardio-Rheumatology, focused on cardiac diseases among patients with rheumatologic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, and ankylosing spondylitis, among others. Her clinical research in this area has focused on the evaluation of structural cardiac disease and diastolic dysfunction in ankylosing spondylitis patients, primarily using echocardiography.

    Dr. Reejhsinghani has an academic focus in medical education, and believes that instilling a love for bedside medicine and the physical exam is the soundest way to empower future generations of learners. To this end, she received additional training in clinical teaching and simulation at the University of California, San Francisco, and has worked extensively on curriculum and course design. She currently serves as the associate program director of the cardiovascular medicine fellowship at Stanford, and is an associate course director for the Year 1 Practice of Medicine Course at the Stanford University medical school. Dr. Reejhsinghani also enjoys writing, particularly about medical education and has written articles for international newspapers, among other publications.

  • Olaf Reinhartz

    Olaf Reinhartz

    Associate Professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery

    Current Research and Scholarly Interests1. Mechanical circulatory support in failing Fontan circulation
    2. Pathophysiologic response to fetal cardiac surgery.
    3. Various clinical projects in pediatric cardiothoracic surgery

  • Jinnie J. Rhee

    Jinnie J. Rhee

    Member, Cardiovascular Institute

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsPharmacoepidemiology of type 2 diabetes and diabetes complications
    Diabetes management in patients with chronic kidney disease
    Health equity and disparities
    Nutritional epidemiology of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
    Implementation science and clinical decision analysis
    Qualitative research and mixed methods research

  • Juan Rivas-Davila

    Juan Rivas-Davila

    Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Senior Fellow at the Precourt Institute for Energy

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsModern applications demand power capabilities beyond what is presently achievable. High performance systems need high power density and bandwidth that are difficult to achieve.
    Power density can be improved with better semiconductors and passive componets, and by reducing the energy storage requirements of the system. By dramatically increasing switching frequency it is possible to reduce size of power converters. I'm interested in high performance/frequency circuits switching >10 MHz.

  • Thomas Robinson

    Thomas Robinson

    The Irving Schulman, M.D. Professor of Child Health, Professor of Medicine (Stanford Prevention Research Center) and, by courtesy, of Epidemiology and Population Health

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsDr. Robinson originated the solution-oriented research paradigm and directs the Stanford Solutions Science Lab. He is known for his pioneering obesity prevention and treatment research, including the concept of stealth interventions. His research applies social cognitive models of behavior change to behavioral, social, environmental and policy interventions for children and families in real world settings, making the results relevant for informing clinical and public health practice and policy.

  • Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Stanley G. Rockson, MD

    Allan and Tina Neill Professor of Lymphatic Research and Medicine

    Current Research and Scholarly InterestsMy clinical research includes studies on risk factor modification in atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease; clinical trials involving medical therapies for peripheral arterial insufficiency; coronary angiogenesis; therapy of lymphedema; atherand photodynamic therapy in atherosclerosis.

  • Fatima Rodriguez

    Fatima Rodriguez

    Associate Professor of Medicine (Cardiovascular Medicine)

    BioFatima Rodriguez, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor in Cardiovascular Medicine and (by courtesy) the Stanford Prevention Research Center. Dr. Rodriguez earned her medical degree from Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She then completed internal medicine residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fellowship in cardiovascular medicine at Stanford University. She currently serves as the Section Chief of Preventive Cardiology. Dr. Rodriguez specializes in cardiovascular disease prevention, inherited lipid disorders, and cardiovascular risk assessment in high-risk populations.

    Dr. Rodriguez’s research includes a range of topics around racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in cardiovascular disease prevention, developing novel interventions to address disparities, and opportunistic screening of coronary artery disease.